(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The pedigree and history of the Washington family: derived from Odin, the founder of Scandinavia, B. C. 70, involving a period of eighteen centuries, and including fifty-five generations, down to General George Washington, fir president of the United States"

TWi. I ..Alt if 
BRIGHAM YOUN^ UNIVERSITX) 
PROVO, LTAH 



Do Not 
Circulate 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 
in 2010 witii funding from 
Brigiiam Young University 



littp://www.arcliive.org/details/pedigreeliistoryoOObyuwell 



uu^ 



/.4y\^ 



THE 

PEDIGREE AND HISTORY 

OF THK 

WASHINGTON FAMILY: 

DERIVED FROM 

ODIN, THE FOUNDER OF SCANDINAVIA, B. C. 70, 

INVOLVING A PERIOD OF 

EIGHTEEN CENTURIES, AND INCLUDING 
FIFTY-FIVE GENERATIONS, 

DOWN TO 

GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON, 

FIRST PRESIDENT OF THK UNITED STATES. 



BY 

ALBERT WELLES, 

President of the American College for Genealogical Registry and llcmldiy. 



NEW-YORK : 
SOCIETY LIBRARY. 

1879. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1879, by 

ALBERT WELLES, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



PREFACE. 



MY position as President of the "American College 
for Genealogical Registry and Heraldry " enables 
me to obtain correct pedigrees and history of For- 
eign Families, and as the English history of the Washing- 
ton Family, by several authors, has been confessedly suppos- 
ititious, it is deemed important that a correct and authentic 
volume should be written that would become the standard 
for reference on the subject. 

My correspondent in London, from whom I have ob- 
tained the material for the Washington Pedigree in E^ig- 
land, is a lineal descendant of the progenitor in England, 
and has been engaged over thirty years in gathering evi- 
dence. He thus writes : " If I had not taken upon myself 
the great labor of examining those inestimable Records, 
the ' Common Pleas Rolls,' the truth of that great man's 
lineage would not have been revealed. They are of im- 
mense value, and I hope you will make them known to 
your countrymen by the publication of the Washington 
History. The pedigree I now send I can establish by legal 
evidence. 

The uncertainty hitherto existing in regard to the English 
progenitors of the Washington Family, which has led to 
the numberless and fruitless controversies among the 
Genealogists, will be entirely removed and cleared up by 
this volume. Beginning with Odin, the Founder of Scan- 
dinavia, B. c. 70, the history is followed down thrcjugh the 

[iii] 



IV PREFACE. 

Royal line of Denmark in the thirty-two generations to 
" Thorfin the Dane," nat. circa a. d. iooo, whose ances- 
tors were of Schleswig, Denmark. He settled in York- 
shire, England, prior to the Norman Conquest. The 
descent is traced in Denmark and England, from father to 
son, down through the centuries, including branches in 
different shires, to John Washington, the great-grand- 
father of General George Washington, in twenty genera- 
tions from Thorfin ; with interesting personal matter 
regarding nearly 500 members of the Family and their 
alliances in England and America. 

The Family of Washington derives its name from the 
Village of Wassington, juxta Raven sworth (now called 
Wharleton), in the Parish of Kirkby-Ravensworth, in the 
North Riding of Yorkshire. Originally Evervicscire — the 
Eboricure of the Romans, or Evereux, — afterwards Ebor, 
at the time of the Conquest, and lastly Yorkshire. 

The people of this part of the country were all of Scan- 
dinavian descent, and spoke the same language with the 
Normans themselves, which was the language of the 
Ancient Angles. The Saxons never settled here, and were 
of a different race. The City of York having been long 
before that time especially a Danish City, and the Chief 
City in all England. 

With respect to the ^«^/^-Saxons, there were no Saxons 
in these parts, which was settled by the Angles, who spoke 
the same language as is spoken this day in these parts of 
Yorkshire ; and all those Saxon inscriptions, about which 
so many wonders are made, is simply plain Yorkshire. The 
Angles were a branch of the Danes, who lived in Schleswig 
(a seaport town of Denmark), and came over to England, 
men, women, children, beasts, &c., and left that country 
desolate for 300 years, as is confirmed by the Saxon chron- 
icles. 

The 174 manors given to Earl Alan by the Conqueror. 
Avere only so many shadows. There were only about six 



PREFACE. V 

manors really attached to the Earldom of Richmondshire ; 
of all the others he was merely nominally the Chief Lord ; 
and each was held by an owner whose ancestors held for 
many generations before the Conquest. 

There was never in Richmondshire above six families 
descended from Norman Ancestors ; and they acquired 
their lands by marrying heiresses. 

The growing importance and value of such a work as 
this, is illustrated by the increasing interest in everything 
pertaining to General Washington, and it is, in fact, the 
only genealogy and Family History of national importance 
in tJiis country. 

The Bible, is a History of the earliest races ui Mankind ; 
and a Record of the Jewish Lineage — Religion, the Science 
of Immortality — Genealogy cognate with both, inasmuch 
as it is a study embracing the present life, combined with 
departed generations, giving results of vast import in the 
future, and may therefore be considered next only in im- 
portance to Religion and Bible History. 

The Songs with which the Northern Bards regaled the 
Heroes at their " Feasts of Shells " were but versified 
chronicles of each Ancestral line, symphonied by their 
stirring deeds. 

Through the oak fire's uncertain flame, the Chieftain saw 
descend the shadowy forms of his Fathers ; they came from 
the Halls of Odin, as the harper swept the strings, and 
deployed before their descendant, rejoicing in the sound of 
their praise. No parchment told his Lineage to the Warrior 
of those days, but the Heroic Names were branded each 
night upon his swelling heart by the burning numbers of 
the Bards. 

Thus did the Northman chronicle his Ancestry in those 
unlettered times. Afterward, when the oak fire was extin- 
guished, the shell thrown by, and the night came no more 
with songs ; when we reach the age of Records we find this 
love of Lineage availing its^jlf of the new meth d (T « om- 



vi PREFACE. 

memoration. This strong Ancestral spirit of the Northman 
may traced, partly to the profound sentiment of perpetuity 
which formed the principal and noblest element of his 
character, and partly to the nature of the property to which 
he was linked by immemorial customs of the race. 

The Family History, or Record, of the Sovereigns of the 
World before Christ, furnish almost the only Histories of 
the Countries over which they reigned, as Egypt, Chaldea, 
Babylonia, Greece, &c. The Chinese annals, the most 
ancient known, were written with the most perfect exact- 
ness, and preserved with the greatest care ; composed 
originally by order of the Emperors — each of whom on his 
accession to the throne, commanded \\\& acts of his predeces- 
sors to be written by some learned philosopher — so that the 
whole form one uniform continued series of the History of 
the Ancient Chinese Empire, from the beginning of the mon- 
archy (Fo Hi B. c. 2538), for some thousands of years. 
And thus was the history oi China obtained ai,n(l preserved more 
correctly, and for a longer period than that of any other nation 
in the world. Had not the Hebrew race cherished this love 
of Kindred and Lineage we should not have any Bible 
to-day, and to this feeling we owe our knowledge of the 
History of the most ancient Kingdoms of the World and 
most of our Modern History. The English Registers have, 
for upwards of a thoiisatid years, been the protection and 
authority of many families ; and the means oi preserving large 
property interests. A. W 

We are indebted to Mr. Henry J. Johnson for the use of 
several of the beautiful steel-plate illustrations from his 
publication, entitled " The Life and Times of Washington." 
Also to Messrs. G. P. Putnam's Sons for similar favors ; 
and to John C. Buttre, Esq., Steel-plate engraver. Also 
to James Phillippe, Esq., of London, for the English 
Pedigree. 



DERIVATION 

OF 

"THORFIN, THE DANE," 

EARL OF THE ORKNEY ISLES, 

FOUNDER OF THE WASHINGTON FAMILY IN ENGLAND, 

CIRCA A. D. 1030-35, 
FROM 

ODIN, 

FIRST KING OF SCANDINAVIA, B. C. 7O. 



Page V. Odin, the son of Fridulf, supreme ruler of the 
Scythians, in Asaland, or Asaheim, Turkestan, between 
the Euxine and Caspian Seas, in Asia. He reigned at 
Asgard, whence he removed in the year b. c. 70, and 
became the first King of Scandinavia. He died in the 
year b. c. 50, and w^as succeeded by his sons, who 
reigned in different parts of Scandinavia. His son 

Page vii. Skiold became King of Zealand and Jutland, 
B. c. 50, and died b. c. 40. His son was : 

Page viii. Fridleif, who became the first King of Den- 
mark, B. c. 40. He died b. c. 23. His son was : 

Page viii. Frode Fredigod, who became King of Den- 
mark, B. c. 23. He died a. d. 35. His son was : 

Page viii. Frode H., who became King of Denmark, a. d. 
59. He died a. d. 87. His son was : 

Page viii. Vermund, the Sage, who became King of 
Denmark, a. d. 87, and died a. d. 140. His son was : 

Page viii. Olaf, the Mild, who became King of Den- 
mark, A. D. 140. Obit A. d. 190. His 

Page viii. Daughter, became Queen of Denmark, — and 
" " Dan Mvkillati, her husband, became King of 

7 



DERIVATION OF THORFIN. 

Denmark, a. d. 190. He died a. d. 270. His son 

was : 
Page ix. Erode HI., who became King of Denmark, a. d. 

270. He died a. d. 310. His son was : 
Page ix. Halfdan, who became King of Denmark, a. d. 

310. Obit a. d. 324. His son was : 
Page ix. Fridleif III., who became King of Denmark, 

A. o. 324. He died a. d. 348 His son was : 
Page ix. Frode IV., who became King of Denmark, a. d. 

348. He died a. d. 407. His son was : 
Page ix. Halfdan II., who became King of Denmark, 

A. D. 456. Obit A. D. 457. His son was : 
Page ix. Roe, who became King of Denmark, a. d. 460. 

He died a. d. 494. His son was : 
Page X. Frode VI., who became King of Denmark, a. d. 

494. He died a. d. 510. His son was : 
Page X. Frode VII., who became King of Denmark, a. d. 

522. He died a. d. 548. His son was : . 
Page X. Halfdan III., who became King of Denmark, 

a. d. 548. He died a. d. 580. His son was : 
Page xi. IvAR Vidfadme, who became King of Denmark, 

a. d. 588. Obit A. D. 647. His daughter. 
Page xi. AuDA Diuphraudza, Queen of Holmgard, mar- 
ried Rerick, King of Holmgard. Fler son was ; 
Page xi. Harald Hildetand, who became King of Den- 
mark, A. D. 647. Obit A. D. 735. His son was : 
Page XV. Throud, King of Frondheim, who married a. d. 

750, a daughter of Sigurd Hring. His son was : 
Page XV. EiSTEN, King of Frondheim, born about a. d. 

755. Married a. d. 780. His son was : 
Page XV. Halfdan, King of Frondheim, born about a. d. 

785. Married a. d. 810. His son was : 
Page XV. EiSTEN Glumru, King of Thrandia, born about 

a. d. 815, became King of Thrandia, a. d. 840. His 
Page XV. Daughter married, a. d. 850, Ivar, Earl of 

Upland. Their son was : 

8 



DERIVATION OF THORFIN. 

Page XV. EiSTEN Glumru. He was living a. d. 870. His 

son was : 
Page XV. RoGVALD, who was Earl of Moere, a. b. 885. 

His son was : 
Page XX. EiNAR, Earl of the Orkney Isles. His son was : 
Page XX. ToRFiDUR, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles, 

A. D. 942. His son was : 
Page XX. LoDVER, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles. 

His son was : 

Page XX. Sigurd, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles. 

His son was : 
Page xxii. " Thorfin, the Dane," Earl of the Orkney 

Isles, also called Torkill, of Richmondshire, England, 
Baron, and Lord of Tanfield, Founder of the Wash- 
ington Family of England. 

9 



DERIVATION 



OF 



GEORGE WASHINGTON, 

FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, 

FROM 

"THORFIN, THE DANE." 



Page I. " Thorfin, the Dane," Earl of the Orkney Isles, 

also called Torkill, of Richmondshire, England, Baron 

and Lord of Tanfield, Founder of the Washington 

Family in England, was born about a. d. igio, and 

settled in Yorkshire, England, about 1030-35. Obit 

about A. D. 1080. His son was : 
Page 4. Bardolf fil Thorfin, born about a. d. 1035. 

Obit about a. d. 1120. His son was : 
Page 5. Akaris fil Bardolf, born about a. d. 1080. 

Obit a. d. 1 161. His son was : 
Page II. BoNDO fil Akaris, born about a. d. 1122. Obit 

about A. D. 1200. His son was : 
Page 14. Walter fil Bondo de Washington, born about 

A. D. 1160. Obit about a. d. 1245. His son was : 
Page 17. Robert de Washington, born about a. d. 1195. 

Obit about a. d. 1260. His son was : 
Page 25. Robert de Washington, born about a. d. 1230. 

Obit about a. d. 1300. His son was : 
Page 31. Robert Washington, born about a. d. 1265. 

Obit about a. d. 1325. His son was : 
Page 36. John Washington, born about a. d. 1305. He 

died before a. d. 1386. His son was : 

1 1 



DERIVATION OF WASHINGTON. 

Page 38. John Washington, born about a. d. 1330. He 

died about a. d. 1405. His son was : 
Page 41. John Washington, born about a. d. 1365. He 

died about a. d. 1425. His son was : 
Page 43. Robert Washington, born about a. d. 1400. 

He died about a. d. 1479. His son was : 
Page 44. John Washington, born about a. d. 1430. He 

died 4 May, a. d. 1501. His son was : 
Page 47. Robert Washington, born a. d. 1467. He died 

20 September, a. d. 1517. His son was : 
Page 51. Thomas Washington, born a. d. 1493. He died 

about a. d. 1560. His son was : 
Page 65. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 15 15. 

He was living a. d. 1543. His son was : 
Page 77. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 1540. 

He was living a. d. 1588. His son was : 
Page 86. Laurence Washington, born a. d. 1569. He 

was living a. d. 1629. His son was : 
Page 96. Leonard Washington, born about a. d. 1595. 

He died a. d. 1657. His son was : 
Page 105. Colonel John Washington, born a. d. 1627. 

He died in January, a. d. 1677. His son was : 
Page III. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 1661. 

He died a. d. 1697. His son was : 
Page 114. Augustine Washington, born a. d. 1694. He 

died 12 April, a. d. 1743. His son was : 
Page 126. GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON, first 

President of the United States, born February 22, a. d, 

1732, and died 14 December, a. d. 1799. 

12 



INTRODUCTION. 



^ » »» 



All the Ancient Records of England are w ritten in abbreviated Latin, 
and in writing varying in character from Hebrew, or Arabic to Greek, so 
that very few can read or understand tliem properly. 

An attempt was made some years ago to publish some of these Record- , 
but the parties employed to trai. scribe them could not read the originals cor- 
rectly and left out much of the most important information. 

With respect to the "Domesday Book," it is simply a schedule of the 
lands belonging to the King's Geld, and does not include any of the inde- 
pendent freeholders of the period, and is therefore not of that importance, 
ignorantly attributed to it. William the Conqueror, although he confis- 
cated some of the great fiefs of the Anglo-Saxon nobles, yet he did not 
touch the lands belonging to any of the tenants holding feudally under 
them. It embraces the whole of Yorkshire, with which is included part of 
Lancashire and Westmoreland. 

YORKSHIRE. 

The County of \'ork gave William the Conqueror more trouble than 
any other of the shires. The eminent General Ilerreward le Wake, who re- 
sisted the Norman invasion more successfully tlian even Harold, was a na- 
tive of what was then the North Riding. The Eboricans, after the country 
was subdued, allied themselves with the Angles, and were in constant re- 
volt. The original Anglo-Saxon families disgusted with Norman severities, 
retired into Scotland, and it is from the " Ragged Roll" that the investiga- 
tor can find trace of these families, after their removal. In view of this, 
there is good ground for the statement made by several writers, that there 
was actually no Survey made in the County of York at the period of the 



11. INTRODUCTION. 

Conquest. The '• Ragged Roll," copied by Nesbit, was returned to Scotland 
by Edward III. 

The Saxons settled in the middle and southern portions of England, 
and were of a different race, the city of York having been long before that 
time especially a Danish city, and the chief city in all England. 

The uncertainty hitherto existing in regard to the early progenitors of 
the Washington Family in England, which has led to the numberless and 
endless controversies among the English and American genealogists, will be 
entirely removed and cleaved up by this History, which is based upon and 
compiled mainly from the " Common Pleas Rolls " of England. 

These Rolls run over 2,000 skins of parchment for every year, and are 
closely written on both sides in abbreviated Latin. They contain every- 
thing relating to law, both civil and criminal, in all parts of England, with 
the Coronors' Rolls, &c. They form an extensive and valuable historical 
depository, and have been the means of clearing up and correcting a vast 
amount of the early history of the country at the time of, and subsequent to 
the Norman Conquest. 

This Washington Family History therefore being mithentic, must be- 
come important and valuable in England and America. The above Rolls 
having been inaccessible because inscrutable, liave never been used by other 
Genealogists who have attempted to compile a " Washington Pedigree," 
and their disputes and controversies have been bitter and fruitless. General 
Washington's ancestors for many generations before they emigrated to 
America were agriculturists, and the reason that the names of the two 
brothers, Laurence and John, who came in 1659, do not appear in the pn!>- 
lisheii \\f,is, was because they were not '^subsidy men" but farmers of good 
estate, and this accounts also for the fact that the Genealogists were unable 
to trace the pedigree of the Washington Family in England, as it could not 
be found in any of the Public Records, except the "Common Pleas Rolls," 
all of which may be plainly seen in this History of the Family. 

Washington Irving states that tlie progenitor of the Washington Family 
in England, from whom was derived George Washington, first President of 
the United States, was William de Hertburn, of Durham, 1183 who ex- 
changed his village of Hertburn for the manor and village of Wessyngon, 
in Durham, and changed his name with the estate to de Wessyngton, and 
cites the " Bolden Book" to prove him the ancestor of the Washington Fam- 



INTRODUCTION. 111. 

ly, which the said book fails to do, but only recites that de Hertburn made 
:he exchange. As Irving does not give account of the descendants of above 
William, he fails to prove him the ancestor of the American Washingtons. 

He mentions next a William de Wessyngton who was at the battle of 
Lewes in 1264, inferentially son or grandson of said William de Hertburn, 
which he was not, as he was son of Walter fil Bondo de VVessington of Rav- 
ensworth, Yorkshire. He next mentions Sir Stephen de Wessyngton, of Dur- 
ham, 1334, but does not state rvho he was. And next in 1350a *William de 
Wessyngton, manifestly also descended from above William de Hertburn — 
as being lord of the manor of Wessyngton in Durham, and died 1367, whose 
son William succeeded to the estate, and as he left no male heir, the name 
and line died out, being merged into the Tempest (not Temple) family by 
marriage of his daughter with Sir William Tempest, of btudley in York- 
shire, who gave up the manor, and it passed »o the family of Blackstone. 
Thus it is seen by Irving's own showing that William de Hertburn could 
not have been the ancestor of the American Washingtons, 

He next refers to a John de Wessyngton, Prior of the Benedictine Con- 
vent in Durham, 141 5. He does not state who he 7vas, but that he died in 
1446. Having abandoned the de Hertburn founders, he next takes up for an- 
cestor the Hon Laurence Washington, Mayor of Northampton, and states 
that he was son of John Washington, of Warton, Co. Lancaster. The 
above Laurence was son of John Washington, of Tuwhitfield, Co. Lancaster, 
who was derived from Robert de Washington, of Milleburn, Westmoreland, 
but General Washington was not derived from said Laurence. He ne.\t 
states that "John and Andrew Washington were great grandsons of above 
Laurence, and emigrated to Virginia in 1657." The two brothers Laurence 
and John, who emigrated in 1659, were sons of Leonard Washington, of 
Warton, Co. Lancaster, who died at Warton in 1657. His father and grand- 
father were named Laurence, born and died at ^^'arton, Co. Lancaster. 

Irving winds up the English pedigree thus : " We have entered with 
some minuteness into this genealogical detail, tracing the family step by 
step through the pages of historical documents, for upwards of six centuries." 



• Above William, who died in 1367 was descended from William de Washington, 
son of Walter fil Bondo, of Wessington, ju.\ta Ravensworth, Yorkshire. As there were 
several villages in different parts of England named Wessyngton, either might have served 
for ancestors. 



IV. INTROD CTION. 

Those who will read the first chapter of his book may see the length of the 
steps, and the genealogical detail. 

I have taken Irving as a type of the class. Many others have made- 
similiar derivations. If any of these gentlemen had traced the lineage of the 
Washington Family /"ww William de Hertburn, down through the genera- 
tions from father to son, they might have named him as the progenitor in, 
England, but as they have all failed in this, it is sinnply absurd to have 
adopted him. Furthermore the family was founded in England nearly two' 
centuries prior to the time of said William de Hertburn. 

WASHINGTON. 

Of all the noble families of England, that of Washington i-; the most 
ancient and one of the most illustrious. Tracing back through the Royal 
line of Denmark to that great hero King Odin, the Founder of Scandinavia. 
B. C. 70, whose life and character were so great and glorious that his people 
deified himself and family, and thus established a Scandinavian mythology 
of equal magnitude and grandeur with that of ancient Greece and Egypt, 
and of such minuteness in detail as to have confused some historians whO' 
were unable to separate the real from the mythological history. 

The remarkable resemblance of character between Odin and his de- 
scendant Washington, separated by a period of eighteen centuries, is so 
great as to excite the profound and devout astonishment of the genealogical 
student — one the Founder of the most eminent race of Kings and Conquerors, 
and the other of the Grand Republic of America. 

SCANDINAVIA. 

There is a nation, even now extant, possessing a history as brave as that 
of the Romans, as poetic as that of tlie Greeks — a nation that has con- 
trolled the world's history in many things and at many times, and whose 
achievements in war and in letters, are worthy the most heroic age of 
Rome and the most finished period of Greece ; a nation whose philosophy 
outran their age and anticipated results that have been slowly occurring 
ever since. This reference can be true of but one people, the Norsemen, 
the dwellers in Scandinavia, who lived as heroes, lords and conquerors ; 
who, sailing out of the ice and desolation in which they were born and nur- 
tured, conquered England, Scotland and Ireland, ravaged Brittany and 



INTRODUCTION. V, 

Normandy, discovered and colonized Iceland and Greenland, and crossed 
the Atlantic in their crazy barks and discovered this very continent long 
before Columbus; anchored in Vineland Sound, and left a monument behind 
them ; and wheresoever they went they were lords and rulers. 

And then their religion — what a wild, massive, manly mythology ! 
With nothing of the soft sentimentalities of more southern people, but con- 
tment of much that revelation has assured us to be true in doctrine — present- 
ing ever the necessity of right and doing right — of manliness, honesty and 
responsibility ; rewards and punishments. 

All the ancient traditions of the North agree in describing the first in- 
habitants of Scandinavia as men of colossal stature and includible strength. 
These giants (or trolls as they were called by the Eddas) were alleged to 
have been a remnant of the Canaanitish Anakim (descendants of Anek, de- 
rived from Canaan, the son of Ham, the son of Noah), whom Caleb and 
Joshua, by Divine command, drove out of Palestine, and who ultimately 
settled in Scandia after fighting many battles with the Scythian emigrants, 
from Asia. 

1. ODTN. 

The most important epoch in the historical antiquities of the North, and 
the most memorable from the extraordinary revolutions it accomplished, is 
the arrival of Odin, the Mars as well as the Mohammed of Scandinavia, the 
founder of those religious and political institutions which universally pre- 
vailed there until the introduction of Christianity.* 

The account of the historical Odin, as narrated by Snorre in the Yng- 
lina Saga, states that he came from Asaland or Asaheim, a district east- 
ward of the river Tanais, the capital of which was called Asgard, and the 
people Asen or Aesir. 

By his superior military talents Odin had endeared himself to his 
Asiatic subjects. He was successful in every combat, whence his warriors 
believed that victory hung on his arm. When he sent foith his soldiers to 
any expedition he laid his hands upon them and blessed them ; they then 

* It was in the reign of Emund Biorn, King of Sweden — 820 to 859 — that the 
light of the gospel first dawned in the north, although it did not become the established 
religion until the accession of Olaf Skotkanung, a.d. iooi, who, with his whole family, was 
baptized in looi. The surname of Skotkanung or Tribute King, was given to Olaf on ac- 
count of a yearly tax he paid to the Pope to carry on the war against the Infidels. Olaf" 
was baptized by Sigefroy, an English monk whom King Ethelred of England had sent to> 
Sweden. 



VI. INTRODUCTION. 

believed themselves invincible. The invasion of the Romans at length 
compelled him to flee towards the North, " where he knew that a place of 
refuge was reserved for him and his people." 

Leaving his two brothers to rule at Asgard, he proceeded with his 
pontiffs and a vast concourse of followers (evidently the Sviar or Suiones of 
Tacitus) through Gardarike, or Russia, to Saxland, subduing all the nations 
as he passed, and bestowing their dominions as kingdoms upon his sons. 
Having disposed of these countries he next crossed the Baltic, and cliose 
the agreeable island of Fionia for his residence, where he is said to have 
built the city of Odense. The whole of Denmark submitted with little re- 
sistance. Passing into Sweden, where a prince named Gylfe then reigned, 
he fixed his abode near the Lake Logur (the Maelar Sea), in the modern 
province of Stockholm, and erected a splendid temple at Sigtuna for cele- 
brating the rites of the new faith. The surrounding territory, which formed 
the cradle of his empire, was called the Lesser Svithiod, or Sweden, in con- 
trast to the Larger Svithoid or Scythia, from whence they had emigrated, 
and Mannheim, the " Home of Man," to distinguish it from Asgard or God- 
heim, the abode of the Asen or celestial deities. In Upsula and the neigh- 
boring districts places were assigned for the residence of the pontiffs. 

" The migration of this renowned adventurer with a band of followers 
from the banks of the Tanais is generally placed about the middle of the 
first century before Christ. Among tlie fugitive princes of Scythia who 
were expelled from their country in the Mithridatic war by the superior 
genius and resources of Pompey, tradition has placed the name of Odin, the 
ruler of a potent tribe in Turkestan, between the Euxine and Caspian seas." 

" His true name, according to tradition, was Sigge, son of Fridulph, 
but he assumed that of Odin, the Supreme Deity of the Scythians, of whose 
religion he was chief priest. After achievtng so many glorious conquests 
Odin retired to Sweden, where he ended his days B.C. about 50." 

After the death of Odin his authority, both regal and pontifical, was 
transmitted co his sons and chiefs, whom he had placed on the neighboring 
thrones. Heimdall was made ruler of Scania. Skiold established himself 
with a colony of Goths at Ledra in Zealand, which he erected into a mon- 
archy ; and from him descended the Skioldungs, a race of Kings which long 
swayed the sceptre of Denmark. Yngve, another son, reigned in Sweden ; 
and from him sprang the Ynglings, a name by which the ancient Sovereigns 



INTRODUCTION. Vll. 

of that country are distinguished in history. Balder was appointed viceroy 
over the Angles, in the southern part of the Cimbric Chersonese, or ancient 
Holstein, and hence the Anglo-Saxon princes all traced their origin to that 
venerable progenitor. Horsa und Hengist, the two Saxon chiefs that con- 
quered England in the fifth century, reckoned Odin (or Woden in their 
dialect) as their ancestor ; and even in Lower Germany the greater part of 
the reigning families calculated their descent from the same stock.* 

The following are the five sons of Odin, who, after his death, about 
B. C. 30, divided Scandinavia into equal parts, viz : — 
2 Heimdal, reigned in Skania. 

2 NiORD or Yngve, reigned in Sweden. Died B. c. 20. 
2 Seming or SUABONE, reigned in Norway. 

Tradition placed Seming, a son of Odin, on the throne of Norway, 
and from him descended a race of Pontiff Kings, of whom nothing but their 
names are recorded. 
2 Balder, Viceroy of the Angles at Schloswig Holstein, in the southern 

part of the Cimbria Chersonese. 

2 SKIOLS, reigned at Ledra, in Zealand, and at Jutland. He became 

the head of an illustrious race of Kings called Skioldunger, who 

reigned at Leire (Ledra), in Zealand, twenty miles from Copenhagen. 

He died K. c. 40. The island of Zealand was ceded by Gylfe to 

Gefyon, who had married Skiold, one of the sons of Odin. 

The small States forming the Kingdom of Denmark continued three or 

four centuries under the sway of various petty princes, the chief of whom 

were the .Skioldungs, that branch of the family of Odin which established 

the seat of their authority at Ledra in Zealand. Skiold, the founder of this 

dynasty, reigned about forty years before the Christian era. Tradition has 

ascribed to Skiold the usual qualities of the heroic age, great bodily 

strength and the most indomitable courage. Among iiis other military 



* In the district of Loftahammars, close to the Swedish town of V'estervik. a most 
interesting collection of ancient Russian coins, to the number of 610, in good condi 
tion, have been discovered at a little distance below the surface of the earth. The large 
number of these rare coins shows the extent of the commercial relations which existed 
some thousand years ago between Sweden and the interior of the present empire of Russia, 
where Swedish colonies were established all along the great rivers, down to the Black Sea. 
't is now also an established fact that when Scandinavia became Christian most of the 
pilgrims to the Holy Land proceeded thence through Russia, where the original commer 
cial Swedish colonies for several centuries retained their native tongue. — New York Paper, 
Nov. 30, 1876. 



viii. INTRODUCTION. 

exploits he is said to have conquered the Saxons and subjected them to the 
payment of an annual tribute. The son and successor of Skiold was : 

3 FRIDLEIF THE FIRST, who was called the First King of Denmark of 

the Skioldungers, or descendants of Skiold, the son of Odin. He suc- 
ceeded to Skiold B. c. 40, and died B. C. 23. His sons were : 

4 Frode Fredigod. 

4 Fridlief. 

4 Havar. 

4 "FRODE FREDI&OD (Pacific) was King of Denmark at the time of 

Christ." He succeeded King Fridleif in year B. c. 23 and died A. D. 35. 

Frode I. enjoyed the reputation of unrivalled prowess as a warrior, 
having carried his victorious arms into Sweden, Germany, Hungary, Eng- 
land and Ireland. So strict was the administration of justice in his own 
dominions, that, if we may credit the Northern legends, bags of gold might 
have been safely exposed on the highways. It is alleged that he compiled 
a civil and military code, which Saxo Graniniaiicus states to have been 
extant in his time. He was succeeded by his Ijrother Fridleif. His son was : 

5 Frode, born at Ledra about A. D. i. 

4 Fridleif the Second became King of Denmark in a. d. 35, and died 

A. D. 47. He was succeeded by his brother 
4r Havar, who became King of Denmark a. d. 47, and died A. D. 59. 
He was succeeded by his nephew 

5 FRODE THE SECOND, son of Frode Fredigod above, who became King 

of Denmark A. D. 59, and died A. D. 87. His successor was his son 

6 VERMUND THE SAGE, who became King of Denmark A. D. 87, and 

died A. D. 140. His successor was his son 

7 OLAF THE MILD, who became King of Denmark and Zealand A. D 140, 

and died A. D. 190. His daughter married Dan Mykillati, who was 
his successor. 

8 DAN MYKILLATI (the Splendid), became King of Denmark in A. D. 190. 

He died A. D. 270, after having reigned eighty years, with the greatest 

justice and reputation. Almost all historians agree that he was the 

founder of the kingdom of Denmark. 

The first that united the Danish provinces (except Jutland, which 
formed a separate monarchy) under one government was Dan Mykillati (the 
Magnanimous), King of Scania, a descendant of Heimdal, and married to a 



INTRODUCTION. IX. 

daughter of Olaf the Mild, Sovereign of Zealand and Denmark, and sixth in 
descent from Skiold. He reduced the whole country, with the smaller 
islands, to subjection, and is alleged to have given his name to the new 
kingdom of which he was the founder. The union of his sister with Dyggve 
of Sweden, is reckoned the earliest matrimonial alliance that was formed 
between the two Crowns. The son and successor of Dan Mykillati was : 

9 FRODS THE THIRD, who became King of Denmark a. i>. 270, and died 

A. u. 310. The son and successor of Frode the Third was: 

10 HALFDAN THE FIRST, who became King of Denmark a. d. 310, and 

died A. D. 324. He subdued Sweden, defeated Aun in many battles 
and having driven him from the throne, he fixed his residence in Up- 
sala, where he died A. D. 324. The son and successor of Halfdan was: 

11 FRIDLEIF THE THIRD, who became King of Denmark A. D. 324, and 

died A. D. 34S. His son and successor was : 

12 FRODE THE FOURTH, who became King of Denmark A. D. 348, and 

died A. D. 407. The three sons of Frode the Fourth were : 

13 IngILD, who succeeded to his father as King of Denmark A. D. 407, 
and died A. D. 436. Another 

13 HALFDAN THE SECOND, who succeeded to his brotherTngild as King 
of Denmark A. D. 456, and died A. D. 457 ; and 

13 Frode the Fifth, who succeeded to his brother Halfdan A. D. 457, 

and died A. D. 460. He was succeeded by Roe and Helge. 
The dominions of Halfdan II. (above) were inherited by his sons, 

14 ROE and ) who reigned from 460 to 494. They agreed to divide the 
14r Helge, ' sovereignty between them. The former is said to have built 

the city of Roskilde, but he exchanged liis patrimony in the North 
for the Danish possessions in Northumberland, Eng., where he fixed 
his residence and conquered several provinces from the Anglo Saxons. 
His brother Helge invaded the Swedish territory, defeated King Adils 
plundered the palace at Upsala and carried off the Queen, a Saxon 
princess named Yrsa. The lady from being his prisoner became his 
wife, and the mother of the celebrated hero (15) Rolf Krake, one of 
the brightest ornaments of the throne. His stature was gigantic and 
his strength extraordinary. Having perished ignobly by the treachery 
of a nobleman on whom he had bestowed his daughter in marriage, the 
crown became the prize of contending factions until the kingdom was 



^ INTROD CTION. 

again united under the sceptre of Ivar Vidfadme, who transmitted it to 

his grandson, Harald Hildetand. 

In the middle of the seventh century the brothers Rerik and Helge 
reigned jointly m Leire (Lethra) Zealand, and Ivar Vidfadme, King of 
Denmark, made himself ruler over a great part of the North, To obtain 
Sjelland (Zealand) he gave his daughter Audur in marriage to Rerik, al- 
though she preferred Helge. Afterward he kindled variance between the 
brothers so that Rerik in a fit of jealousy killed his brother Helge. Where- 
after Ivar succeeded in conquering Rerik and acquired Zealand. He lost 
liis life on an expedition to Russia (Garderige) A. D. 647. About this time 
Hamlet (son of Horvendill, Iiereditary prince of Jutland) was killed in a 
battle as lie was endeavoring by force^KX succeed to the Crown of Denmark, 
to which he was entitled, as havinj,- marriect-tiej-utha, daughter of Rerik. 

Harald Hildetand, a son of Rerik (and Au(JhJ). at the death of Ivar 
brought under subjection all the countries his granc^'her Ivar had ruled, 
and became a mighty and sovereign King, but in 735, aftST^^ peaceful reign, 
his nephew Sigurd Hring, Viceroy in Sweden, raised an ins«'''''^ction against 
him. The battle was fought at Bravallahede, Sweden, ai^ Harald was 
killed. 

15 PRODE THE SIXTH, son of Roe above, succeeded to Roe aa^'^ Helge, 

and became King of Denmark A. D. 494. He died A. u. 5^°- "^^ 
successor was his cousin, Rolf Krake, son of Helge above. 1 

16 Rolf Kbake became King of Denmark a. d. 510. He was a'' ""- 

mense size ; his enormous stature and strength were so extraordhil?^^''/ 
that he was surnamed Krake. He kept 12 giants at his court. He 
was killed by his own sister, Skulda (married to Hjartvar, Rolf's Vice- 
roy in Skane), in A. D. 522. He died childless. 
The successor of Rolf Krake was Frode VII., son of his cousin Frode 

16 FRODE THE SEVENTH, or Olaf the Sharp Eyed, became King of 

Denmark a. d. 522, and died A. D. 548. His two sons were : 

17 Halfdan III., or .Snaile, King of Denmark. 

17 Rorik Slyngeband, also King of Denmark. 

17 Ingiald lUrada, King of Sweden. 
The successor of Frode VII. was his son 

17 HALFDAN THE THIRD, or Snaile I., became King of Denmark 
a. d. 548, and died a. d. 580. He was succeeded by his brother 



INTRODUCTION. XI. 

17 RORIK Sltngeband, who became King of Denmark A. D. 580, and 
died A. D. 588. He was succeeded by his nephew 

18 IVAR VIDFADME, son of Halfdan III., who became King of Denmark 

A. D. 588, and of Sweden A. U. 630, and died A. D. 647. 

Historians rank him among the most distinguished warriors of anti- 
quity. He raised Denmark to an unprecedented height of power. He con- 
quered all Sweden (allt Sviaveldi) and united it with all Denmark (allt 
Danaveldi) and a great part of Saxland, the whole of Estland and a fifth 
part of England. P'roiu him henceforth descend the supreme Kings of the 
Danes and the Swedes. The throne and extensive dominions of Ivar were 
inherited by his grandson, Harald Hildetand ; from him they descended to 
Sigurd Ring and Ragn^r Lodbrok, all of whom swayed the Danish sceptre 
in the eighth century. Ivar married dothilda, by whom he had a daughter 

19 AUDA DIUPHAUDZA, who became the wife of 

19 Rh'RtK, or RoBEUT, King of Holmgard, whose son was : 

20 HARALD HILDETAND, or Hilldi-IXU (Golden Tooth), who succeeded 

to Ivar Vidfadme as King of Denmark a. d. 647, and died A. 1). 735, 
when he was succeeded liy his nephew, Sigurd Ring. 

Harald Hildetand, grandson of Ivar Vidfadme, raised Denmark to aa 
illu-trious height of grandeur. Not content with chastising the neighbor- 
ing States, he made frequent incursions into Geimany, took the \'an(lals 
under his protection, reduced several nations on the Rhine, invaded tlie 
coasts of France and overran part of Britain, which, according to .'^a.xo, had 
withdrawn its allegiance from the Danish Kings since the death of Erode 
III., A. D.310. His fleets are described as covering the Sound, and like 
those of Xerxes bridging over the Northern Hellespont from shore to sliore- 
but his life and reign terminated at the fatal battle of Bravala. fought on 
the coast of Bcania in 735, against his nephew, Sigurd Ring, in consequence 
of his attempt to expel him from the throne. The son of Harald Hildetand 
was (21) Tliroud. 

21 Sigurd Hring, (son of the King Randver, who married Ilildetand's 
sister Asa), became King of Sweden and Denmark a. d. 735. 
The Danish throne fell to the possession of Sigurd in 735, who, like 
other Danish Kings of his time, embarked in sea-roving expeditions to keep 
all', e the military entliusiasm of his people. He recovered the Englreh 
province of Northumberland, conquered by Ivar Vidfadme, which had as- 



XU. INTRODUCTION. 

serted its independence, and at his death, A. D. 750, he left the crown to 
his son, the famous Kagnar Lodbiok. He married Queen Alfliilda. His 
children were : 

22 Ragnar Lodbrok, or Lodbrok the Elder (Hairy Breeches), and a 
22 Daughter, who was married A. D. 750, to Fronde or Throud, or 
Hoerk, King of Frondheim, son of Harald Hildetand above. 
22 Ragnar Lodbrok, son of Sigurd Hring, became King of Denmark 
A. V. 750. 

This monarch while ruling his dominions in peace, his jealousy was 
■excited by rumors of ihe daring achievements of his sons in various regions 
of Europe, and in A. D. 794 he determined to undertake an expedition that 
should rival their fame. Two vessels were built of immense size, such as 
had never before been seen in the North. " The arrow," the signal of war, 
Avas sent through all his kingdom to summon his champions to arms. With 
this apparently inadequate force he set sail, contrary to the advice of his 
Queen, Aslanga, who presented him with a magical garment to ward off 
danger. After suffering from storms and shipwreck he landed on the coast 
of Nortliumberland, Eng. Ella, the Saxon King of that country, collected 
his forces to repel the invader. A battle ensued, wherein the valiant Dane, 
•clothed in his enchanted robe and wielding the huge spear with which he 
had slain the guardian serpent of the Princess Thora, four times pierced the 
•enemy's ranks, dealing death on every side, whilst his own person was in- 
-vulnerable. But the contest was unequal, liis warriors fell one by one around 
him until he was at last taken prisoner, stripped of his miraculous vest and 
thrown alive, by order of Ella, into a dungeon full of serpents, in the midst 
■of which he expired with a laugh of defiance, chanting the famous death- 
song called the Lodbrokar-quida, or Biarka-mal, which he is alleged to 
have composed in that horrible prison. " The surname of Lodbrok or 
Hairy Breeches he acquired from the rough garment, daubed with sand 
and pitch, that he wore when he slew the serpent and gained the hand ot 
Thora, his first Queen." — Torfacus Hist. Nor. torn, I. lib. X. c, 29. 

" Ragnar Lodbrok was remarkable for his exploits and enterprises of 
hazard. Perpetually roving in defiance and war, partly on the southern and 
eastern coasts of the Baltic, partly in Flanders, Scotland, Ireland and Eng- 
land, and being lord and ruler wherever he went, lie was at last captured 
by King Ella, of Northumberland, who tlncu him bound into a dungeon 



INTRODUCTION. xiii. 

of vipers. His four sons, avenging his death, divided the widespread 
realms which Ivar Vidfadme, Harald Hildetand and Sigurd Ring had 
gathered together. " 

The first wife of Ragnar Lodbrok was Thora, who bore no children. 
His second was Asloga, daughter of Sigurd and Byrnhilda. She was the 
mother of: 

23 Biorn Jarnaside, who became King of Sweden a. d. 794 

23 Gudrod, or Godefred Hvidsaerk, who became King of Jutland 

and Wendon, and died A. D. 810. 
23 Ivar Beentoris, who became King of Northumberland. 

23 Siguard Snogoje, who became King of Denmark. 
After the death of Ragnar Lodbrok, A. D. 794, his son 

'23 SiGUUD Snogoje (Snake Eye) inherited the Danish Crown, but was 
slain in battle with the Franks A. D. 803, after extending his sway over 
all Jutland, Scania, Holland and part of Norway. His son was : 

24 Horda Knut or Harde-Canute, born about A. D. 790. 

The historian Meursius speaks in high terms of Sigurd Snake Eye : 
■" God enabled him to complete a reign as pregnant with real felicity as any 
which the annals of Denmark can show." 

At the death of Sigurd Snogoje, A. D. 803, he was succeeded by his son : 
24: HoRDA Knut, or Harde Canute, who being young at the time of his 
father's death, was left to the guardianship of his uncle Gudrod, Re- 
gent of the Kingdom. 

During the Prince's minority Jutland threw off its allegiance and the 
sovereignty was fiercely contested between the sons of Gudrod and Harald 
Klak, a petty King of Schloswig, and fatherof Rurik, who had taken violent 
possession of Frisia. He was repeatedly driven from his dominions and 
his flight became remarkable as the means of shedding the first rays of 
Christianity over the Pagan darkness of the North. The achievement of 
this desirable object was reserved for Louis le Debonnaire, son of Charle- 
magne, whose Court at Ingleheim on the Rhine, was visited (a. d. 826) by 
the exiled Prince of Jutland, accompanied with his Queen, his sons and 
numerous retinue, in a fleet of a hundred galleys. Here the solicitations of 
the Emperor and his prelates induced Harald to renounce the errors of 
Paganism. His wife and children and many of his followers were bap- 
iized. Harde-Canute died A. D. 850. His son was: 



XIV. INTRODUCTION. 

25 Gorni, surnamed "The Old." 
Ragnar Lodbrok bestowed the Swedish Crown as a distinct possession 
on one of his sons, Biorn Jarnasida (Ironside), in whose grandson's reign 
(Biorn II.) it is generally admitted that the light of the gospel first dawned 
in the North, although it did not become the established religion until the- 
accession of Olaf Skotkanung, who was baptized with his whole family in 
the year lOOl, and exerted himself with great enthusiasm to propagate the 
true faith. His father Erik is said to have carried his zeal for Christianitj^ 
so far as to cause the magntficent heathen temple at Upsala, with its idols 
and images, to be destroyed, and the ancient sacrifices to be interdicted 
under the severest corporeal inflictions, but this imprudent mandate cost 
him his life, as he was murdered in a tumult of the people enraged at the 
demolition of their Pagan worship. 

Olaf. — He made a temporary conquest of Norway, and having an- 
nexed Gothland inalienably to his own dominions, he assumed the title of 
King of Sweden, his predecessors being merely styled Sovereigns of Up- 
sala. His son Edmund Jacob contributed so much to the progress of Divine 
truth among his subjects as to obtain the designation of " Most Christian 
Majesty." A severe law which procured him the name of Kolbrenner (the 
coal-burner) enacted that if any man injured his neighbor, his effects to the 
same value, should be consumed with fire. His successor became involved 
in a dispute with the Danes about adjusting the frontiers of the two king- 
doms, and fell at the head of an army which he had levied for recovering; 
the ceded province of k?cania. Indignant at the surrender of that valuable 
district, the Swedes raised Steukill to the throne, who founded a new 
dynasty to the exclusion of the race of Lodbrok. The Goths, who likewise- 
claimed the right of election, chose Hakon the Red as their King ; but the 
rival monarchs came to an amicable arrangement by stipulating that the 
latter should enjoy the regal dignity for life, on condition that, at his 
demise, Gothland should revert inseparably to Sweden. 
25 GORM, the son of Horda Knut, surnamed the Old from the length of 

his reign, fifty-eight years. He became King of Denmark a. D. 883, 

and died a. D. 941. 

Profiting by the absence of many of the jarls and chiefs in distant 
predatory expeditions, he subdued Jutland. Other conquests followed 
until he succeeded in uniting into one State the territories which now con- 



INTRODUCTION. . XV. 

stitute the Danish monarchy, including the Swedish provinces of Scania 
and Holland. He had espoused the beautiful Thyra Dannebod (ornament 
of Denmark), daughter of Harakl Klak, who had been baptized when a 
child in France, and through her influence he was induced to tolerate the 
preaching of the missionaries, although he still continued to worship the 
idols of his ancestors. His sons were : Canute and Harald. 
The son of Harald Hildetand (No. 20) above was : 

21 THROUD or FRONDE, King of Frondheim, who married a daughter of 

Sigurd Ring, A. D. 750, and was father of 

22 EISTEN, King of Frondheim, who married A. D. 780, and was fatlier of 

23 HALFDAN. King of Frondheim, married A. D. 810, and was father of 

24 EISTEN GLUMRU, King of Frondheim or Thrandia, A. D. 840. His 

25 DAUG-HTER, was married to 

25 IVAK, Jarl or Earl of Upland, A. D. 850. He was son of Halfdan the 
Aged, born about A. D. 800, whose father was Sveide the Viking, who 
was living from A. D. 760 to 780. The son of Ivar was : 

20 EISTEN GLUMRU or VORS. He was living A. D. 870. He was father of 
27 Huldrich, ancestor of Raoul de Teeny. 

27 Sigurd, the first Jarl or Earl of the Orkney Isles, and of 

27 EOGVALD,* Jarl or Earl of Moere, A. D, 885. By his first wife, Rogvald 
had four sons, viz.: 28 Hallidur. 28 Ivar. 28 Hrollagur, or Drugo 
Turstain. 28 Einar, Jarl or Earl of the Orkneys. 

By his second wife, Hilder, daughter of Rolf Nefio, he had : 

28 Thorer, Jarl or Earl of Moere, and 

28 Rollo, First Duke of Normandy, A. d. 912. 
Rogvald was killed by Harald Harefoot's sons, and Harald granted 
Rogvald's brother, Huldrich, the fief of Normandy, and Rollo conquered 
it from the original Dukes of Neustria. 

28 Hrollagur or Drogo, a. d. 896 third son of Rogvald, Jarl or Earl of 

Moere. In the division of Normandy in fiefs, among his followers 
in 912, Rollo, the conqueror and first ruler in Normandy, allotted the 
northern disliict of La Manche to his half brother Drogo, who took the 

* The line of Rogvald Irom Sulitn Jliftoire Ciifiqi/e du Danemarc ; and Snorro, 
Histoiia Regnum Sejitentnonahiim. Tirsiain. from M, le Compte de Toustain-Riche 
hour^. Hist. Genial de la MaUon de TouKlain- Front eboxq. BERTRANofrom Ordericus 
Vitalis ; the Cartulary of the Abbey of St. Trinite at Caen ; and Leguin Histoire Militaire 
des Bocains. 



Xyi. INTRODUCTION. 

surname of Turstain. The Bertrand family were derived from Drogo. 
Drogo married Ermina. His son was : 

29 Hrolp, or Robert Turstain. He was living in 920. 

This Robert Turstain was the potent baron " Vir nobilis et praepotens 
Torstingus " that in A. D. 960 gave certain lands to the Abbey of St. Wand- 
rille (or Fontanelle), which Duke Richard I. san ctioned and confirmed 
By Gerlotte, his wife, daughter of Theobald, Count of Blois and Chartrcs, 
Robert Turstain was the father of three distinguished sons : 
30 Anslech, Baron of Briquebec, 

30 Onfroi, or Aunsfred, surnamed the Dane in memory of his northern 
origin, the sire of Turstain-Goz, and ancestor of Hugh Lupus, 
Earl of Chester, and 
30 William, ancestor of the Lords of Bee Crespin, all of whose sig- 
natures appear on a charter A. D. 990, to the Abbey of Mount 
St. Michel. 

30 Anslech Turstain, the first son of Robert Turstain, was Baron of 

Briquebec in 943, and his grandson William, Baron of Briquebec, was 
the first to take the name of Bertrand, from whom descended the Rus- 
sell family of England, Dukes of Bedford. 

In the i-ebellion of Rioulf of St. Savour against Duke William Long- 
sword, in a. D. 933, Anslech, Baron of Briquebec, is mentioned by Wace 
as one of the three barons who alone remained faithful to the Duke, by 
rendering him military service at the siege of Rouen ; and on the assassina- 
tion of that Prince he was appointed by the barons of Normandy and Bre- 
tagne one of tlie three guardians to his son. the young Duke Robert, at a 
crisis which required a rare union of courage, firmness and discretion, and 
fulfilled his trust during that long and troublous minority with infinite 
reputation to himself and advantage to his country. It was in the time of 
Anslech that the Castle of Briquebec was first erected, now one of the most 
beautiful and picturesque ruins in La Manche. 

Anslech lived to witness the accession of Duke Richard II. At his 
death lie left two sons : 

31 Turstain, Baron of Briquebec and Lord of Bastenbourg. 
31 Richard, or Turstain Haralduc or Halduc ; and a daughter 
31 Ertemburga, who was married in A. D. 950, to Torf de Harcourt, 
son of Bernard the Dane, and who became the ancestress of the 
Harcourt family in England. 



INTRODUCTION. xvii. 

31 TURSTAIN DE Bastenbourg, Baron of Biiquebec, first son of Anslech 

Turstain, (No. 30 above), was born in La Manche, Normandy. He 
left at his death two sons and a daughter, viz. : 

32 William Bertrand, Baron of Briquebec. 

32 Hugh Cum Barba, (so denominated from wearing his beard un- 
shorn, which was not the regular habit of the Normans), and 

32 Gisela. During the Government of Duke Richard II. she en- 
gaged ths affections of Geroye, Lord of Montreuil and Echauffour, 
and became the mother of seven sons and four daughters, whence 
issued, says Ordenius, a race of hardy knights who were the 
terror of the barbarians in Apulia, Syria and Thrace. 

32 William Bertrand, Baron of Briquebec, first son of Turstain de 
Bastenbourg, and first to take the name of Bertrand, was born at Bri- 
quebec, in La Manche, Normandy. 

His name occurs on a charter in 1023, of Duke Richard II., confirm- 
ing to the Abbey of Mount St. Michel, all the deeds and privileges granted 
by his predecessors, and especially those of the Duchess Gunnora, his 
mother, wife of Duke Richard I. In this document he is styled "William 
the son of Turstain, and his name is followed by that of " Hugii, his 
brother," and their kinsman "Richard" (the Viscount d'Avranches), as 
witnesses. William Bertrand had issue three sons : 

33 Robert, surnamed Le Tort, who succeeded to the barony of 

Briquebec. Wife Susanna. 
33 Hugh de Rozel, born about 1020, was invested with the Cast e of 
Rozel about 1045. Had possessions in the isles of Guernsey and 
Jersey. 
33 William, the third son, and a daughter 
33 Emma, who married Rabel Count de Montchenseye. 
32 Hugh Turstain, the Bearded, brother of William Bertrand, about 
1030 obtained, by marriage of Lady Barbe de Montfort, the town and 
territory of Montfort, in Upper Normandy. 

30 Onfroi or AuNSFRED, Viscount d'Exmes, second son of Robert Tur- 

stain, (No. 2g above) was born at Briquebec, in La Manche, Normandy. 

In 1016 Richard II., Duke of Normandy, gave the county of Exmes to 

Aunsfred, the Dane, brother of Anslech, Baron of Briquebec. His son was : 

31 Turstain Goz, Viscount d'Exmes and Argentan, who was born at 

Exmes, in Normandy. He married Judith de Monteroliers. 



XVIU. INTRODUCTION. 

Turstain Goz, succeeded to Exmes, in which he was confirmed by the 
Barons during William's minority, who also made him Viscount of Argentan 
and Governor of the Castle of Falaise. His son was : 

32 Richard Goz, Viscount d'Avrancbes. He married Emmcline de 
Montagne. He witnessed Duke Richard II. charter to Mount 
St. Michel, A- D. 1,001 His son was : 
33 HughI/UPUS. He was Earl of Chester, and with Hugh de Montgomerie, 

Earl of Shrewsbury, united his forces in resisting the inroads of the 

Welsh into England. 

The daughter of Anslech Turstain (No. 30 above) was : 
31 Ertemburg.\, who was married A. D. 950, to 
31 ToRP or ToRFiN, Seigneur de Torraille, surnamed Le Riche, who 

was born at Schlosvvig, in Denmark, about a.d. 920. He wandered to 

the country of Greenland. 

" In 1,007 ^ '''ch Greenlander, Torfin, determined to emigrate to Vin- 
land^ (now New England.) His followers numbered 60, and he was ac- 
companied by his wife Gudrida, the widow of a previous explorer. Five 
other women were on board, and the ships were freighted with all 
kinds of domestic animals, tools and provisions for a permanent col- 
ony. Gudrida had been the first female to see the new woikl, having 
accompanied her former husband during the previous year. The ex- 
pedition of Thorfin prospered. The natives came in great numbers and 
trafficked in furs and produce. Gudrida bore a son, Snorro, the first birth 
of European parentage in America, who is said to have been an ancestor of 
the sculptor Thorwaldsen. The family remained three years in the colony, 
but ultimately returned, and Thorfin settled and died in Iceland. The 
widow made a pilgrimage to Rome in her bereavement, and died in a 
cloister founded by her son in Iceland. Other chiefs went to Vinland, but 
their history thi^ows no further light upon the colony. They, however; dis- 
covered land extending far away to the south-west and inhabited by natives 
of different caste, of darker color and more vigorous frame. The colony 
perished at last, destroyed probably like that of Greenland. Traces of it 
were found by Jesuit missionaries among the Indians Gaspe at the mouth of 
the St. Lawrence, a tribe which revered the symbol of the cross before the 
arrival of the missionaries. Physical constitution and peculiarities of man- 
ners and customs are also cited in confirmation of European descent. Father 
Charlevoix adds that ' many marks distinguishing them from other Ameri- 



INTRODUCTION. XIX. 

can Indians go far to make me believe that they are a colony of Europeans 
degenerated into savages through destitution.' " 

His father was : 
SO Bernard the D.\NE, Prince in Denmark, Governor and Regent in 

Normandy under Rollo, with whom he received baptism at Rouen 

A. D. 912. The son of Torf (No. 31 above) was : 

32 TouilODE, Sire de Pont Audemer, whose wife, Weva Duceline de 

Cr^pon, was sister of the Duchess Gonnor,* wife of Richard I. (Sans 

Feur), Duke of Normandy, and thus was the great grandmother of 

William the Conqueror. 

Weva Duceline was niece of Tourode. She was sister of Osberne de 
Cr^pon, High Steward of Normandy, who married Avelina, and was the fa- 
ther of Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham, Eng. , and daughter of Herfault, 
the brother of Tourode, and they were grandsons of " Bernard the Dane." 
Osberne was assassinated at Vandreuil when sleeping in the chamber of Duke 
William, who was then a child. Crcpon was an estate near Bayeux, Nor 
mandy. 

Of the six children of Tourode the eldest was : 

33 Onproy or HUMPHROI DE Veldtis, Count of Pont Audemer. Estates 

of Pont Andemer went to the Bardulf family of St. Mary's of Hoo, 
Kent, Eng. He married Aubiice Dame de la Hare Aubertie about 
1027. His son was : 

34 Roger de Beaumont, who died Nov. 29, 1094. By his wife Adeline, 

Countess of Millent, he was father of : 

35 Robert, Earl of Millent, in the Vexin, afterward, in 1103, Earl of 

Leicester ; and of 

35 Henry, Earl of Warwick, in 1068, who married Margueritte, 
daughter of Rotrou, Count of Perche. 
The youngest child of Tourode was : 

33 Josseline, who married Hugh de Montgomerie, Count of Montgomerie 
and Earl of Shrewsbury. Their children were : Roger, Robert, Wil- 
liam, and Gilbert Montgomerie. 
Another son of Torf (No. 31 above) was ; 



* Gunnora was the mother Richard II, Duke of Normandy, who by his wife Judith 
was father of Robert, Duke of Norm.-indy, who by his wife Arlotta was the father of 
William the Conqueror. 



XX. INTRODUCTION. 

32 TuRCHETiL, Sire de Turchetil, from whom were descended the family 
of Harcourt in England. 

28 EINAR, Eael of the Orkneys, 4th son of Rogvald, (No. 27 above). 

Earl of Moere, had three sons, viz. : 

29 Tcrfidur. 

2g Erlind, and 

29 Arnkell. These last two sons were both slain A. X>. 942. 

29 TORFIDUR, first son of Einar. (No: 28 above), became Earl of the Ork- 

neys A. D. 942, married Grelota, daughter of Dungad, Earl of Caith- 
ness, whose wife Groa was daughter of Turstain Rauda. The sons of 
Torfidar were : 

30 Arnfidur. 
30 Havard. 

30 Lodver, Earl of the Orkney Isles. 
30 Liotur. 
30 Skulo. 

30 LODVER, third son of Torfidur, (No. 29 above). He succeeded to his. 
father as Earl of the Orkney Isles, and was succeeded by his son 

31 SIGURD, as Earl of the Orkney Isles. He married Thora, daughter 

of Malcolm, King of Scotland. His sons were : 
32 l^umarlis. 

32 Bruso, whose son was Jarl Rogvald. 
^2 Einar, and 
32 Thorfin, who was the father of Bardolf and Bodin of England. 

28 TnoRER, Jarl or Earl of Moere, was fifth son of Rogvald, Earl of 

Moere, (No. 27 above). 

He married Alofa Arbot, daughter of Harald, first King of Norway^ 
A. D. 885, (son of Halfdan the Swart), whose wife Alfhilda was daughter of 
Hringo, son of Dagus, King of Upper Hringa. 

The daughter of Thorer was : 

29 Bergliotta, who became the wife of 

29 Sigurd, Earl of of Hlatha, whose son 

30 Earl Haquin became King of Norway, A. D. 921, and reigned un- 

til A. D. 996. By his first wife he was father of 

31 King Eric, who married Guda of Denmark, and was father of 

32 King Haquin, whose wife was Thyra. 



INTRODUCTION. XXI. 

By his second wife Thora, daughter of Skage Skofteson, Earl Haquia 
above had children : 

31 Swein, wliose wife was Holmfrida of Sweden. 

21 Hemingur. 

31 Erling. 

31 Bergliota, who married Einar Thamba-Scelfur, and had son, Earl 
Eindred, and 

31 Ragnhilda, who married Skopte Shakeson. 
28 RoLLO, sixth son of Rogvald, (No. 27 above). 

Rollo devastated Holland and appeared upon the Seine while Gottfried 
ravaged the valleys of the Meuse and Scheldt. They burned and sacked 
Cologne, Bonn, Treves, Metz and other cities, stabling their horses at Aix- 
la-Chapelle, in the Cathedral Church of Charlemagne . A fu7cre Noimaun 
arum libera nos Domine, came to be part of the Catholic litany. Hastings,, 
at the head of a band of Northmen, sacked Bordeaux, Lisbon and Seville ; 
defeated the Moorish conquerors of Spain at Cordova ; crossed the Straits, 
into Morocco ; repassed them ; overran Tuscany ; returned to France, where 
other chieftains liad had various success against Charles the Bald, and em- 
braced Christianity. (See Hastings.) His name, the most dreaded of all 
the Vikings, was adopted by many successors. With safe winter quarters, 
in Spain, they extended their ravages to Naples, Sicily and the coasts of the 
Greek Empire. Anarchy, meanwhile, prevailing in France, in the autumn 
of 885 they laid siege to Paris. After a year the siege was converted into a. 
blockade, but at last King Charles the Fat, bought off the Northmen with 
700 pounds of silver and a free passage to the Upper .Seine and Burgundy. 
The most redoubtable of the Northmen afterward Avas Hrolf, better known 
as Rollo, chieftain, of Norwegian parentage, first Duke of Normandy, and 
direct ancestor, in the sixth generation, of WiLLiAM THE Conqueror. In 
the words of Snorro Sturleson : " He was so mighty of stature that there was 
no horse of strength and size to bear him. He was therefore always on foot, 
and was called the Marcher." He ravaged P'riesland and the coimtries. 
watered by the Schieldt, and took Rouen, St. Le Bayeux and Evreux.. 
From Charles the Simple he accepted the hand of a daughter, together with 
a tract of Neustrian territory north of the Seine, from Andalye to the sea 
(modern Normandy), in exchange for Christian baptism and an oath of fealty 
(912). Thus was arrested the Scandinavian flood whicli had devastated 
France for more than a century. Rollo distributed among his followers the 



xai. INTRODUCTION. 

lands of Neustria, to be held of him as Duke of Normandy. Thus were 
laid the foundations of the feudal system which William (7th Duke) trans- 
planted into England (1066-87). Few external traces of the Scandinavians 
are to be found in modern Normandy. Yet for a time the Scandinavian 
gods divided with the Saviour the religious reverence of the people of that 
country. Monasteries and cathedrals were built, however, with what extent 
and magnificence their splendid remains attest. The Normans adopted the 
language of the vanquished province, but greatly modified it. It was the 
langiie (Toni (the languc d'oc being south of the Loire), which became under 
Norman inspiration the peculiar medium of romantic poetry. 
32 THORFIN, The Dane, or Torkill of Richmondshire Baron, Lord of 
Tanfield, founder of the WASHINGTON FAMILY in England, fourth son 
of Sigurd, (No. 31 above). Earl of the Orkney Isles, was born about 
A. D. 1000. He was Jarl or Earl of the Island of Orkney, that vias 
held as a feif, under the Kings of Denmark. 

These Earls were Sigurd, son of Eisten Glumru; Einar, son of Rogvald, 
Jarl or Earl of Moere ; Torfidur, son of above Einar ; Lodver, son of Torfi- 
dur ; Sigurd, son of Lodver ; and Einar and Thorfin, sons of Sigurd. 

They were called LOKDS OF the Isles. The present Duke of Argyle 
is descended from them. They were the ancient Marmours, one of the Mar- 
mours was represented in the Maring Charters with Thorfin. 

ARMS: Normandy, g'w/e* two leopards or lions passant gardant. or, a bend com- 
ponyor andrtsure. Blois a2?M'«, a bend rt?\g'ew< coticed potence contrepotence, o?\ Har- 
COURT, lozengy o/' and gules. Bertrand, or, a lion rampant j;ert, langued and raguled, 
gules, and crowned, argent. Montfort, bendy or and azure. Montchenskye, or. 3 
escutcheons, 2 and I, barry of vaire and gules. Du Rozel, argent, a lion rampant aules. 
achief o'aWe. WAR-CRY o^ Normandy, " Diex aie!" Of Turstain, " Tons telnet 
desang!" Of Montchenseye, " Montchenseye." 



TAe line of descent may be traced through the full face Caps. 



AMERICA DISCOVERED 

BY RELATIVES OF 

THORFIN, 

THE 

PROGENITOR OF THE WASHINGTON FAMILY 

IN ENGLAND. 



That Columbus did not discover America, everybody who believes 
in the traditions of the Indians, that go to show an Asiatic descent of the 
gentle savage, is compelled to own. But who discovered these descend- 
ants of the East, after their wanderings, is a question that promises to 
prove far more agitating than the vital one of what constitutes the 
"American drama." Assuming that the original inhabitants of the 
American continent forced their way from the East through the icy regions 
of the North, and by way of Behring's Straits (as all scientific men assume, 
they being agreed that man sprung up in the East and found his way to 
the West), the question now is, who discovered their progeny on this 
continent? Until a very few years ago the people of the temperate and 
torrid zones were quite agreed that one Christopher Columbus, a Genoese 
voyager, was that person. These people took no heed of the Phoenician, 
Greek, Welsh, and Irish claims, and as they knew little and cared less for 
the Scandinavian literature, did not apprehend the cropping up of an- 
other and more formidable claimant than had yet appeared, from the icy 
North. It will be seen, therefore, that from such a diversity of demands, 
nearly all of which seem genuine, it will be rather difficult to select the 



XXIV. INTRODUCTION. 

justest, and settle the matler in an agreeable manner to all concerned. 
In the first place, it is maintained that the Greek philosopher Pythias tra- 
versed the Atlantic Ocean 340 B. C, and discovered the different length 
of days in different climates. It is also well known that the Phoenicians 
colonized the Canary Isles, and, it is said, these bold sailors pushed their 
way to the West and found this continent ages ago. The Welsh declare 
that one of their ancestors, named Madoc, settled here in 1322, one hun- 
dred and seventy years before Columbus landed. Ninety-one 3^ears before 
this, a Norseman was driven on the coast, and found people who appeared 
to him to speak Irish, although he did not understand that language. 
The Norsemen themselves, whose claims we are about to examine, insist 
that America was accidentally discovered in the year 986 by Bjarne Her- 
julfson, who did not land, although he came near the land three times, 
first, where the present Nantucket stands, second, at Nova Scotia, and 
the third time at Newfoundland. When Bjarne went home to Norway 
two or three years later, and recounted his strange adventures, he was 
censured by his chief for not Landing .and exploring the strange land. 
Still, what he had done was sufficient to arouse Leif Erikson, son of the 
Jarl, and he determined to find what kind of regions these were that were 
so much talked about. He bought Bjarne's ship, selected a crew, and 
found the land just as had been described. They landed at Newfound- 
land and Nova Scotia, then sailed South, and entered the bay now known 
as Mount Hope Bay. Here they resolved to spend the winter, and built 
a large house. There was a captive German in the party named Tr>-ker, 
who had become a great favorite with Leif Erikson. One day he was 
missing, and great was Leif s sorrow, for he feared some disaster had be- 
fallen his friend ; but the German was descried toward evening coming 
home in a most excited state, singing and shouting, and bearing in his 
hands bunches of grapes. On his arrival, he continued shouting and 
singing in German, which greatly increased the wonder of his auditors, 
who did not understand that language. At length he explained to them 
that he found grapes growing even as they grew in Germany, upon which 
information Leif p'romptly Christened the place Vinland. This was that 
part of the country now known as Massachusetts, the year was 1000, and 
the Sagas insist that Leif Erikson was the first pale-faced man who plant- 
ed his feet on this continent. These Sagas of the Norsemen, the contents 



INTRODUCTION. *Xy- 

of which are now becoming gradually known to reading men, promise to 
revolutionize many of the old theories the world has held to. In the 
spring Leif returned to Greenland, and there found his brother Thorwald, 
who declared, after listening to his story, that the land had not been half 
explored. So he started out in 1002 and remained in Vinland three years. 
At the end of that time he was killed by a Skraelling (Indian), and buried 
there. He was the first Christian and first white man that died and was 
buried in America, and it is now declared that the skeleton in armor 
found in Fall River, Mass., in 1831, and made famous in Longfellow's 
poem, was no other than the bold explorer, Thorwald Erikson, who was 
killed by Indians A. D. 1005. When the Norsemen had buried their 
chief the}^ at once returned to Greenland. The same j'ear, the Sagas tell 
us, Thorstein, youngest brother to Leif and Thorwald, fitted out a vessel, 
manned it with twentj'-five men, selected for their strength and stature, 
and accompanied b)' his wife Gudrid, a most remarkable woman, set out 
for the new land ; but they met with tempestuous weather, and during all 
the summer were tossed about on the deep, and driven the}' knew not 
where. At length they made Lysefjord, on the coast of Greenland. Here 
Thorstein and several of his men died, and Gudrid returned home. 
The next year Gudrid married Thorfinn Karlsefnc, a wealthy and influen- 
tial person, who, through her persuasions, was induced to fit out an ex- 
pedition for Vinland. This party consisted of one hundred and fifty-one 
men and seven women, and, unlike prior excursions, started fiUIy 
equipped, and resolved on colonization. It was provided with cattle and 
sheep, and arrived safely. Here the party remained for three years, until 
hostilities with the Skrjellings compelled them to give up the colony. 
The Sagas give full accounts of Thorfinn's enterprises in Vinland, about 
the traffic with the Skraellings ; and about the development of the colony. 
They also record the interesting fact, that a son was born to Thorfinn 
and Gudrid, a year after the colony was settled, who was named Snorre 
Thorfinnson. He was born in the present State of Massachusetts, in the 
year 1008, and was the first man of European blood of whose birth in 
America we have any record. From him the famous sculptor Albert 
Thorwaldsen is lineally descended, beside a long train of learned and 
distinguished men, who have flourished during the last eight centuries 
in Iceland and Denmark. The author of "America not discovered by 



y 



XXVI. INTRODUCTION. 

Columbus " calls attention to the Dighton Writing Rock Inscription in 
the Taunton River (which has been translated, "Thorfinn, with one hun- 
dred and fifty-one Norse sea-faring men took possession of this land "), 
and saj's, that this inscription removes all doubt of the presence of Thor- 
finn and the Norsemen in the Taunton River in the beginning of the 
eleventh century. The Sagas give elaborate accounts of other expeditions 
that took place in loii and in 1121, when Bishop Erik Upsi went as a mis- 
sionary' to Vinland. There were other expeditions that went as far south 
as Florida. The last expedition made by them was in the year 1347, the 
year the Black Plague started in Europe. This Plague spread over 
Europe, and at length reached Vinland, and cut off communication be- 
tween the two countries. It reduced the population of Norway from 
2,000,000 to 300,000. and left no surplus for expeditions. Thus the New 
World remained until Columbus visited it in 1492. It is believed that 
Columbus knew of these voyages of the Norsemen. Fifteen years before 
he sailed for America, he was in Iceland, and undoubtedl)' was made 
familiar with the Norsemen's expedition, and the reason wh)- he should 
know of them, was the visit of Gudrid to Rome,* after the death of her 
husband. Rome at that time took great interest in geographical discov- 
eries, and took pains to collect all charts and reports that were brought 
in. The Romans might have heard of Vinland before, but Gudrid 
brought them personal evidence. That Vinland was known to the Vati- 
can, is proved by the fact that Pope Pasch?.! II., in the year 1112, sent 
Erik Upsi, as Bishop, to Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. Recent de- 
velopments also prove that Columbus had the opportunity' to see the map 
of Vinland in the Vatican, and it would appear, indeed, strange that with 
his nautical knowledge, he would not, in the age of discover)' and literary 
activity in which he lived, have heard as much as he did. Beside all this, 
there is another fact which goes to shew that Columbus knew of this con- 
tinent. Adam, of Bremen, a canon and historian of high authority, visited 
and described the North of Europe, and Iceland and Greenland. Having 
given an account of these countries, he say'S, "beside these there is an- 
other region which has been visited by many, Ij'ing in that ocean (the 
Atlantic), which is called Vinland, where vines grow spontaneously, and 
where corn springs up without being sown. This we know, not by fabu- 
lous conjecture, but from positive statements of the Danes." This book 

* See page xviii. 



INTRODUCTION. XXVU. 

was printed in 1073, and, as it was read by all educated men, must have been 
read in time by Columbus. He says himself that he based his conviction 
that there was land in the West on the authority of learned writers. 
Another evidence that he was certain of finding land, after he had " sailed 
seven hundred leagues," was his promise given to his mutinous crew 
when they insisted upon turning back, that if land did not appear in three 
days he would do as they desired. The land appeared, and here is a 
subject quite as interesting as the question, "Who wrote Shakespeare?" 
It can be decided by anybody who will read up in Scandinavian litera- 
ture. , 

It is certain that the Iceland rovers who settled in Greenland explored 
the coast of New England down to Rhode Island. In their intercourse 
with the SkrjEllinger (Esquimaux) these Danes learned that "farther 
southward, beyond Chesapeake Bay, there dwelt white men, who clothed 
themselves in long white garments, carried before them poles to which 
cloths were attached, and called with a loud voice." In the Sagas, the 
history of Tiiorhnn Karlsefne, and the famous chronicle, the Landnama- 
bok, this country is styled the " Land of the White Men " (Hvitramanna- 
land). The Landnama Book says : "To the south of inhabited Greenland 
are wild and desert tracts and ice-covered mountains ; then comes the 
land of the Sknellings (Esquimaux), beyond this Markland (Nova Scotia), 
and then Vinland the Good (Massachusetts and southwards). Next to 
this, and somewhat behind it, lies Albania, that is to say, Ilvitramanna- 
land, ivhitlier vessels formerly sailed from Ireland. It was there that several 
Irishmen and Icelanders recognized Ari, the son of Mar and Katla of 
Reykjanes, whom thej' had not for a long time had any tidings of, and 
whom the natives of the country had made their chief." The Landnama- 
bok also states that Ari Marsson was driven by a tempest to Hvitraman- 
naland, and detained and baptized there. The Northmen are reputed to 
have received tlieir account of Hvitramannaland, which was also called 
Irland it Mikla (Ireland the great) from Limerick traders, vessels from 
that port having sailed thither before the Icelandic discovery of Vinland. 
(Compare Rafu, Antiqtiit. Amer., 203, 206, 211, 446, 451 ; and Wilhelmi, 
Ueber Island, &c., &c., s. 75, 81.) This Ari Marsson, referred to above, 
was of t'lie race of Ulf the Squint-eyed, a heathen family of great influence 
in Iceland. It is the opinion of some, indeed, that the earliest settle- 



XXVUl. INTRODUCTION. 

ments of Iceland were made from Irland it Mikla, the first chronicles and 
Sagas speaking of "west men who had come across the sea." 

In Sir Richard Grenville's voyage to Roanoke he found natives, who, 
as he claimed, saluted him in the purest Erse or Gaelic, calling out to 
him liao, /mi, iach. Owen Chapelain, who in 1669 was captured by the 
Tuscaroras, saved himself when they were about to scalp him by address- 
ing them in Gaelic. They did not understand his words, but were 
familiar with the sounds of his language. Gallatin says that the language 
of these Tuscaroras is a branch of the Iroquois dialect. But this singular 
tribe of Indians, all of whom are white, and many of them blue-eyed, 
■could scarcely be akin to the dark Iroquois. Catlin is strongly inclined 
to think them a mixed race, and believes them to be the descendants of 
the Welsh prince Madoc, son of Owen Gwinncth, who voyaged westward 
in 1170. Humboldt is quite inclined to lliink with Catlin. lie say:: in a 
note to Cosmos: "Although no conncctiim of l;in,'viin;:c lia-^, 3'ct bcc-n 
proved, I by no means wish to deny tliat the Basques and the people of 
■Celtic origin inhabiting Ireland and Wales, who were early engaged in 
fisheries on the most remote coasts, may have been the constant rivals of 
the Scandinavians in the northern parts of the Atlantic, and even that the 
Irish preceded the Scandinavians in the Faroe Islands and in Iceland. 
It is much to be desired that in our da^^s, when a sound and severe spirit 
of criticism, devoid of a character of contempt, prevails, the old investi- 
gations of Powell and Richard Hacklu}'! {Voyages and Navigations, 
vol. iii., p. 4) might be resumed in England and Ireland." 

This Thorfinn Karlsefne was Torf or Torfinn, Seigneur de Torraille, 
surnamed " Le Riche," (see page xviii.,) born about A. D. 920, whose 
father was " Bernard the Dane," Governor and Regent in Normandy, (see 
page xix.) under Rollo, 'ivith whom he received baptism at Rouen, A. D. 
•912. The iirst wife of Thorfinn Karlsefne was Ertemburga, (married A. 
D. 950,) daughter of Anslich Turstin, Baron of Briquebec, son of Hrolf or 
Robert Turstin, Baron, whose father was Hrollagur, or Drogo, the son 
of Rogvald, Jarl or Earl Moere, A. D. 885, and he was the father of 
another son, Einar, Jarl or Earl of the Orknej^s, whose son, Torfidui, 
Earl of the Orkneys, A. D. 942, was father of Lodvar, Earl of the Ork- 
neys, whose son, Sigurd, also Earl of the Orkneys, was the father of 
Thorfin, ancestor of the Washington Family in England. 



o r; 

£oro- 

cr > 



.'COS 

> O 

G 



t3d 

2. W 

S g 



^H 



t« 


r: 


H 


» 


M 


(rt 


5^ 


H 


K 


> 


n 




G 


X 


?a 


M 


4) 


W 



o 

w 
> 



>=;'^ 

CJ O 3 
O- Cl G 
,2 "> !» 

■3 'T3 0' 
r?§S 
:a^ II 

oc :? 

-, n ^ 
ft fo c 

o 3 
3 re 



H-l W 

•-I C H 

p -> 5 

c £;. o 
p a " 



H 
W 
g 

R 

> 



is 

■ o o 

. 3 CO 

P 2! 



> 

C 
3 
(n 

ft 2 

z S-o 
o Uo 

N p '-' 

3 

re 



c 

55 



o o g o 
c ^ ^ ?= 
-1 H o "^ 



O 
ft 

en 

5' 



o 



01 



? ft l-rt 

3 M lC 
ft ^ SC 



2 Hcr" „ O 



O 3- 

cur,™ 

n o ^ 
en 



c 
S 

>- 



<— 1 




■-3 


OP 




»=- 


•i. t^ H 




CO 


!<'^^ 




t-< 


?2 o 

O ^ ?3 


O 


en 


2 MM 


■ P 


oo 


re p ?3 


3 
Co i-« 


ea 


»-( - 


1^ 




•-t f 


^■^ 




£,§ 


isS 




«?4 




?3-^ 


«-3 


ROL 

First D 
Norma 
A. D. 


3> Q. 




vo p 3 r 


f? 

II 


po 


!^ v; re 

O 





p o 

a o i_j Q. -. 



p ~> r 
re o P 



(fl 



crq 
2 '^ 

O M 



tn 



3 3- C 
o re ?o 

re 3 O 



E, M 5 S 



3 

[/> 
z 

o. 

p S z 5s 



3- ;5: 
o C 

Hi 
p < 

=;-o 



> 

o~ 

o 

f 



Cd 
o 

2* 
5 



CO 

G_ 



W 

2_ 
> 

p a 

.r o 

o z 



'^- 

O 
G 

a: 
> 

<- 
> 

O 



W P3 

> > 

o § 



G » 

OS O 

(« t-" 

^- 

p o > 

O p) O 

3 ?3 2 

• -^ re 



o 

so 



W 

Jo 

s 

2 

> 

■II 

'^^ 
G D 



— » 
O t« 

P z 



a: 
> 

t- 

r. 

I— I 

o 

G 



< 
>■ 



o 
r . 

> 

o 

G 



^'^ O 

■ "n 

CO o > 
CO -n 1-1 

• ?P 

re 
1-1 
o 



Q. 

C^~->p 
o ?s « c 

n 3" 



p 



■a=! 



5 ° 3 



i:^re 
o 



>. 

G 
pa 



?? 

c- 

r 

o 



o 

G 
?3 



W 

r - 

5 
o 

> 

Z 

M 
f 

r 



a- p 
c 3- 



W 



re 



.CO 5_| 



3 p - 
re >-i 
Vi — 



O 1-^ 

5 3 









t=3 






SO 



DERIVATION 

OF THE 



AMERICAN WASHINGTONS, 

FROM 

THORFIN THE DANE, 

EARL OF THE ORKNEY ISLES. 



It has been annunciated by authors and others that the great-grand- 
father of George Washington was John Washington of Bridge's Creek, West- 
moreland Co., Va., who emigrated to America about 1657, and that the 
great-grandfather of said John was Lawrence Washington, sometime Mayor 
of Northampton, and the first lay proprietor of the Manor of Sulgrave, in 
Northamptonshire, which was granted to him in 1538. 

Also that Lawrence, brother of John above, had studied at Oxford, and 
John had resided on an estate at South Cave, in Yorkshire, a circumstance 
that gave rise to the erroneous tradition that the family sprang from that 
region. 

The above, partly suppositious, has been copied over and over again by 
writers, and being without dates, seems to defy contradiction. The lack of 
dates has occasioned all the inferences, which are errors. The following is 
the correct pedigree or line of descent from father to son, from 

32.— 1 " THORFIN THE DANE," thirty-second generation from Odin, 
who had two sons : 

2 BoDiN, born at Ravenswath, York, about A. D. 1040. 
2 Bardolf, born at Ravenswath, York, about a. d. 1045. 
" In Molsonby and Diddaston bailiwick of the Geld, 11 carucates and 
10 ploughs. There ToRFiN had one manor ; now BoDiN has there i carucate 
and 15 villans, and 3 borders, with 7 ploughs. There is a church there. 



XXXll. INTRODUCTION. 

The whole was i league in length, and i in breadth, temp. Edward the Con- 
fessor." — (1041-1066 .) 

The above is from the Domesday Book, and is a translation of that por- 
tion respecting the North Riding in Yorkshire, including the district of 
Wharleton, alias Washington. — 1070-1080. 

2 BARDOLF, a Monk, and Lord of Ravenswath, second son of ToRFiN, 

was born in the parish of Kirkby Ravenswath, about A. D. 1045. 

" Bardolf possessed Ravenswath, with divers other fair Lordships in 
Richmondshire, in the time of William theConqueror, but desiring in his 
age to end his days in the devout service of God, forsook the world, and 
with his brother Bodin, took upon him the habit of a monk of the Abbey of 
St. Marie's, at York ; whereunto, at the special instance of Bodin, he gave 
the churches of Patrick-Brompton and Ravenswath in pure alms. To this 
Bardolf succeeded his son and heir Akaris." 

" The Manor of Egginton, Derbyshire, was held at Domesday Survey 
by Azelin, under Geffrey de Alselyn. 

" Bardolf married 'he heiress of Hanselyn (or Alselyn) of this Baron- 
ial Family, and she carried this manor to BarDOLF." 

His sons were : 

3 Akaris, born at Ravenswath, Yorkshire, about A. D. 1080. 
5 Henry, born at Ravenswath, Yorkshire, about A. D. 1090. 

3 AKARIS, or Akary pil Bardolf, Lord of Ravenswath, first son of Bar- 

dolf, was born at Ravenswath about A. d. ioSo. 

" Akaris was the pious founder of Jourvaulx, a famous Abbey of the 
Cisterian order in this northern track." " In 5 Stephen (1,139), Akaris 
founded also an Abbey at Tors, in Wensley-dale in Com. Ebor, then called 
the ' Abbey of Charity.' He departed this life 7 Henry 11 (i,i6i). He 
gave three carucates of land in Warton, and one carucate and a half at Tors 
to the Abbey, where he was buried, leaving nine sons." Of whom were: 

4 Hervey Fitz Akaris, born at Kirkby, Rav. , about a. d. 1120. 
4 BoNDO FiL Akaris, " " " " 1122. 
4 Robert FiL Akery DE AsHTON, " " " 1125. 
4 Herasculfus FiL Akery, " " " 1130. 

4 BONDO FIL AKARIS, Lord of Wessyngton, juxta Ravenswath, Rich- 

mondshire Co., York, a younger son of Akaris, was born at Ravens- 
wath about 1 122. The manor came to him from his father temp. 
Henry IL {1154). 



INTRODUCTION. XXXlll. 

He was called indifferently BoNDO DE WA8SYNGTON or Washington, 
and BoNDO DE Ravenswath. These two places join each other (as per 
map in main body of this work). His sons were : 

5 William Fil Bondo, born at Wassyngton about a. d. 1150. 

5 CoNAN DE Washington, " " " ii55- 

5 Walter Fil Bondo, " " " 1160. 

5 Ralph Fil Bondo DE Ravenswath, " " 1165. 

5 RoRERT DE Washington, " " 11 70. 

5 WALTER FIL BONDO DE WASHINGTON, of Wassyngton, Co. York, 

son of Bondo Fil Akaris, was born there about a. d. h6o. 

He was Lord of Milleburne in Westmoreland in right of his wife 
Agnes temp. King John (1199-1215). He acquired large estates in the 
counties of Northumberland and Westmoreland in right of his wife Agnes, 
Lady Milleburne, daughter and heiress of Ivo de Welleburne, or Mille- 
burne, and resided at Milleburne. He had issue by wife Agnes ; 

, 6 Robert de Washington, born at Milleburne about a. d. 1x95. 

6 William de Washington, " " " 1200. 
His second wife Juliana, who survived him, claimed dower in the 

estates, and was living 30, Henry III. (1245). She claimed dower in the 
lands of her husband in Northumberland and 'Westmoreland, and amongst 
others against her Step-son Robert de Washington, the third part of the 
Manor of Milleburne (or Welleburn), Co. Westmoreland, 30 Henry III. 
(1245). 

6 ROBERT DE WASHINGTON, of Milleburne, Westmoreland Co., first 

son of Walter Fil Bondo de Washington, was born there about 

A. d. 1195. 

" RoBKRTDE Washington, Lord of Milleburne, Co. Westmoreland, in 
right of his mother, 3 Henry III. (1218), against whom Juliana, second wife 
of his father Walter de Washington, claimed the third part of the Mapor 
of Milleburne as her dower, 30 Henry III." (1245). He was seized of divers 
lands in Strickland Ketell, Co. Westmoreland, by the gift of Walter de Strick- 
land, chevalier, and Elizabeth his wife, in free marriage with Johanna their 
daughter. His wife's mother Elizabeth was daughter and heiress of Sir 
Ralph Deincourt, Knt. He had issue, son : 

7 Robert de Washington, born at Milleburne about a. d. 1230. 

7 ROBERT DE WASHINGTON, of Milleburne, Co. Westmoreland, first 

son of Robert de Washington, was born there about a. d. 1230. 



XXXIV. INTRODUCTION. 

" He was Bon and heir, was seized of a capital messuage and divers 
lands in Kerneford, Co. Lancaster, in right of his wife, where he resided 29 
Edward I. (1302). He married Amercia, daughter and heiress of Hugh de 
Kerneford and Lady Kerneford, Co. Lancaster." Plad two sons : 

8 John de Washington, born at Millebume about a. d. 1260. 

8 Robert Washington, " " " 1265. 

8 ROBERT WASHINGTON, Lord of Welleburne, Co. Westmoreland, or 
Milleburne, Co. Westmoreland, second son of ROBERT DE WASHING- 
TON, was born there about A. D. 1265, and removed to Kerneford, 
Co. Lancaster, where he settled. 

He was second son of Robert de Washington, upon whom his father 
and mother settled in fee tail the lands of Kerneford, Co. Lancaster. He 
took part with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and was pardoned by King Ed- 
ward IL in the 12th year of his reign (1319). 

He married Agnes, daughter and heiress of Adam Derling. 

Had four sons : ■ • 

9 Rorert Washington, born at Kerneford, about a. d. 1300. 
9 John Washington, " " *' 1305. 
9 Thomas Washington, " " " 1310. 

9 William Washington, " •' " 1315. 

9 JOHN WASHING-TON, of Kerneford, Co. Lancaster, second son of 

Robert Washing ion, was born there about a. d. 1305. He settled 
at Warton, Co. Lancaster. 

He married 26 Edward II. (I333), Alianora, daughter and heiress of 
John de Warton, of Warton, in Lonesdale, Co. Lancaster, and died before 

10 Richard IL (1386) when his widow was living at Warton. She was 
executrix of the will of William de Lancaster. He had two sons : 

10 John Washington, born at Warton, a. d. 1334. 
* 10 Edmund Washington, " " 1340. 

10 JOHN WASHINGTON, of Lonesdale, Co. Lancaster, first son of John 
Washington of Kerneford, was born there A. D. 1334. He was living 
at Lonesdale 26 Edward III. (1352), and 10 Richard II. (1386), and 
4 Henry IV. (1402). By wife Johanna he had son : 

11 John Washington, born at Warton, about A. d. 1365. 

11 JOHN WASHINGTON, of Warton, Lancaster, first son of John Wash. 

INGION, of Lonesdale, was born there about A. D. 1365, He was ol 



INTRODUCTION. XXXV. 

"Warton and was living there 4 Henry IV. (1402). He was commonly 
called "John Fil John Washington." His sons were : 
12 Robert Washington, born at Warton, about 1400. 

12 William Washington, " " 1405. 

12 EOEEET WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster, first son of JoHN 

Washington, of Warton, was born there about A. D. 1400. He was 
living there temp. Henry V. and Henry VI., and died i6 Edward IV. 
(1479). His sons were : 

13 John Washington, born at Warton, about A. d. 1430, 
13 Richard Washington, " <• k j^^g 

13 Robert Washington, " " " 1440. 

13 JOHN WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co Lancaster, first son of Robert 

Washington, of Warton, was born there about A. d. 1430. He suc- 
ceeded to the Warton Estates, and died 4 May, 17 Henry VII. (1501). 
He was succeeded by his eldest son : 

14 RoRERT Washington, born at Warton, a. d 1467. 

14 ROBERT WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster, first son of JOHN 

Washington, of Warton, was born there a. d. 1467. He was 34 years 
of age at the death of his father, 17 Henry VII. (1504). He was Ser- 
geant-at-Arms to King Heniy VII.,and to King Henry VIII. (circa 1500 
to 1510). He died Sept. 20, 9 Henry VIII. (1517). He disinherited 
his eldest son and heir Thomas, son of his first wife. 

15 Thomas Washington, born at Warton, a. d. 1493. 

His second wife was Amy, sister to Sir Richard Whytell, Knt. Her 
■will dated 2 June, 1525. She died 20 June, 19 Henry VIII. (1527). Her 
husband at his death in 151 7, gave to her and her issue, all his inheritance. 
He married his second wife about 1505. Issue : 
15 Richard Washington, bom at Warton, a. d 1506. 
15 Henry Washington, " " " 1508. 

15 Robert Washington, " " " 1510. 

15 Launcelot Washington, " " " 15 12. 

15 Mary Washington, ''(died)" " 1515. 

15 Mary Washington, " " " 1517. 

15 Anne Washington, " *' " 1520. 

16 THOMAS WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster, first son of Rob- 
ert Washington, of Warton, was born there A. d. 1493. He was son 
and heir, and was aged 24 at his father's death, 9 Henry VIII. (1517). 



XXXVl. INTRODUCTION. 

He was disinherited by his father, and filed his bill in Chancery for the 
recovery of the Estates, but did not recover them . His sons were : 
i6 Laurence Washington, bom at Warton, about a. d. 1515. 

16 Leonard Washinglon, " " " " 1520. 

16 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster, first son of 

Thomas Washington, of Warton, was born there about 1515, He 
was living there 35 Henry VIII. (1543). His sons were : 

17 Lauhence Washington, born at Warton about a. d 1540 . 
17 Leonard Washington, " " " 1545. 

17 Robert Washington, " " " 1550. 

17 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, of Warton, first son oi Laurence; 
Washington, of Warton, was born there about A. D. 1540. He was^ 
living there 30 Elizabeth (1588). Had only son: 

18 Laurence, born at Warton, a. d. 1569. 

18 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster, first son of 

Laurence Washington, of Warton, was born there a. d. 1569. He 
was of Warton i James I. (1603), ist and 4th Charles I. (1625-28). His. 
children were ; 

19 Leonard Washington, born at Warton, about a. d. 1595. 
19 Laurence Washington, " " 1597. 

19 Thomas Washington, " '• 1600 

19 LEONARD WASHINGTON, first son of Laurence Washington, of 

Warton, was born there about A. D. 1595. He was recusant A. D. 1640, 
obit A. D, 1657. His wife was named Anne, and she was also recusant. 
A. D. 1640. His children were : 

20 RoRERT Washington, born and bapt. at Warton, A. d. 1616. 
20 Jane Washington, •' " " " 1619. 
20 Francis Washington, " " " " 1622. 
20 Laurence Washington, " " " " 1625. 
20 John Washington, " " " " 1627. 

These two youngest sons emigrated to Virginia, A. D. 1659. 

20 COL. JOHN WASHINGTON, of Warton, Co. Lancaster and Bridges" 

Creek, Va., the fifth child of LEONARD WASHINGTON of Warton, Eng„ 
was born at Warton, A. D. 1627, and emigrated to America with his 
brother LAURENCE, A. D. 1659, two years after their father's death. He 
died early in Jan. 1677, will proved Jan. 10, 1677. 



INTRODUCTION. XXXVll. 

He was married near Pope's Creek, Va„ in Westmoreland County, 
about A. D: 1660, to Anne Pope, who was his second wife. Their chil- 
dren were : 
23 Laurence Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, about a. d. 

1 661. 
21 John Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, about a. d. 1664. 
21 Elizabeth Washington, " " " 1665. 

21 Anne Washington, " " " 1667. 

From Col. John Washington, the great-grandfather of Gen'l Geouge 
Washington I have carried this lineage back to the progenitor in Eng- 
land, to demonstrate that William de Hertburn (I183) tvas not the Ancestor 
of the American Washingto^s, and also to show the errors of all the usu- 
ally received pedigrees. 



-•^..♦.^ ^- 



The line of descent viay be traced through the full face Caps. 



COAT ARMORIAL OF THE WASHINGTON FAMILY. 



The following, from " Burke's Armory," will show the 
Coat Armorial as granted to branches of the Washington 
Family in several shires of England : 

YORKSHIRE. 

Arj7is — Vert, (green), a lion rampant, argent, (silver), within 
a bordure gobonated or (gold) and azure, (blue). 

Crest — Out of a Ducal coronet, or, (gold), an eagle, wings 
addorsed, sable, (black). 

Motto — Eritus acta probat. 

LANCASHIRE, LEICESTERSHIRE, NORTHAMPTON- 
SHIRE, BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, WAR- 
WICKSHIRE, AND KENT. 

Arms — Argent, (silver), two bars gules, (red), in chief three 
mullets (stars) of the second, gules, (red). 

Crest — A raven with wings addorsed, sable, (black), issuing 
out of a Ducal coronet, or. (gold). 

LANCASHIRE. 
Arms — Barry of four, argent (silver) and gules, (red). On 

a chief of the second, gules, (red), three mullets (stars) 

of the first, (argent). 
Crest — On a Ducal coronet or, (gold), a martlet sable. 



Arms — Argent, (silver), on a fesse gules, (red), three mul- 
lets (stars) of the first, (silver). 

Arms — Gules, (red), on a fesse argent, (silver), three mullets 
(stars) pierced of the field, (gules). 

Arms — Gules, (red), two bars argent, (silver), in chief three 
miillets of the second, (silver). 

The second variety above described was the Coat 
Armour used by General Washington, but the Yorkshire 
Escutcheon was the original Arms of the Family. 




^^iftlB 



\ fT- V^--"J^— ^ 



^<t5^ 







#lf IliOftlAL OF THE WASRiNGTOH FAIil?. 



MoiU- 
LANC 

wicv 

Arms — Arcfent, (^i!vt-r), tv. 



i»TON 



..-e 



\.rcil-'A. v.. 








out * 


.. ■--■■■, ■-■ . 


.s'" •- 


'■ 




1 fi. ■*.* r-^ j\ »- 


t ¥ r-i ,- 




■/ » .'. 


■ ■■ fi-.nr, a!_. 




m'H 'Tule?. (red), (.'n 




ond. puU 




• mullets (stars) 



ma It let sabh . 



od), tin 



). thres 



sectu 



was LUL 



it 

HIKE 




^(?^ 



■^wi-^lflii- .,:^ 






r 



WASHINGTON. 



THE Family of Washington was founded in England 
by 

I THORFIN THE DANE, 

whose ancestors came from Schleswig, in Denmark, and 
settled in ancient Ebor or Yorkshire, prior to the Norman 
conquest. 

The name of " Washington " was derived from a village 
juxta Ravenswarth, called originally, " Wessyngton." 

The name is of Saxon origin, and it existed in England 
prior to the Norman conquest. The village " Wassyng- 
ton " is mentioned in a Saxon charter, as granted by King 
Edgar in 973, to Thornby Abbey. — Collectanea Typograph- 
ica, vol. 4, p. 55. This village is now called " Wharlton," 
and is in the parish of Kirkby Ravensworth, in the North 
Riding of Yorkshire. 

This ToRFiN was a great man, of Danish-Scandinavian 
descent, as were all of the great men of these parts. 

FROM THE DOMESDAY SURVEY, IO70-I080. 

" In Benningham, Torfin had a hall and 2 carucates of 
land of the Geld, and 2 ploughs, held by Enisan of the 



2 WASHINGTON. 

Earl. The whole 2 leagues in length, and i in breadth ; 
and underwood, i league in length, and a half in breadth." 

" In Laton, Torfin had 3 carucates of the Geld, with sack 
and soke, and there were 3 ploughs, held by Bodin his son, 
of the Earl. In the time of King Edward the Confessor, it 
was I league in length, and i in breadth." 

" In Stannigges, Torfin had 3 carucates of land, with 
sack and soke, and 5 ploughs, now Enisan holds of the 
Earl in demesne, i carucate and 3 villains, with 2 ploughs. 
In the time of King Edward, the whole was half a league 
in length, and a half in breadth." 

" In Ravenswarth of the Geld are 12 carucates of land 
and 8 ploughs. There Torfin had one manor. Now Bodin 
holds there, half a carucate, and 16 villains, and 4 borders, 
with 8 ploughs. There is a church there, and a priest, and 
4 acres of meadow. The whole was i league in length, and 
a half broad, temp. Edward the Confessor." 

The above is from " Domesday Book," and is a transla- 
tion of that portion respecting the North Riding in York- 
shire, including the district of Wharleton alias Washington, 
about 1070 to 1080. 

Two sons of Torfin were : 

2 Bodin, born in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, about 1040. 

2 BARDOLF, " " " " 1045. 

" In Malsonby and Diddaston bailiwick of the Geld, 11 
carucates and 10 ploughs. There Torfin had one manor. 
Now Bodin has there i carucate, and 15 villains, and 3 bor- 
ders, with 7 ploughs. There is a church there. The whole 
was I league in length and i in breadth, in time of Edward 
the Confessor." — 1040-1066. 

The manor of Wharton or Washington, or any of the 
adjoining manors are not mentioned, because there was no 
land there belonging to the King's Geld. 






Mi.il ir 









'ill 



:M' iJi 



"l-'lil'li'V'll!! 



,,,,,, .iKlf'^' 

iiiii 



Hi 







PI 

■ Ml i: 'ill! I ' 

..41, I* 



H 

<; 
(J 

en 



1 :i: 

', (■ 



WASHINGTON. 



Manor of 








Manor of 


Ravenswarth. 


Manor of 

Wessington, or 

Washington, 

now called 

Wharleton, OR 

Wharton. 


Hartfell. 


Manor of Kirkby 

Ravenswarth. 

■ 


Manor of 
Gilling. 


Manor of Mar 


shes. 




Manor of Aske. 



Bodin and Bardolf have been mentioned as the sons of 
Eudo de Bayeux*Earl of Britanny, and therefore derived 
from tlie ancestor of the Earls of Richmond, England. This 
error arose from the supposition, that William the Con- 
queror confiscated all of the lands of the Englishmen, and 
gave them to his followers. This is not true, as he confis- 
cated only the lands of a few rebels, which he divided into 
Baronies, and gave them to his leaders. Being too vast for 
occupation by single persons, they were sub-let to Knights 
and Vassals, and oftentimes to the previous tenants. 

The Saxon Earl, Edwin of Mercia, after he had revolted 
" over and over again," when he died without issue, the 
Conqueror was much grieved at the loss of so great a lord, 
and it was only because the Earl Edwin died without issue, 
that William the Conqueror gave his lands to Alan, first 
Earl of Richmond, who was second cousin to William I. 

The 174 manors ^/<7^;2 to Earl Alan by the Conqueror — 
one of which was the manor of Ravensworth, held by Tor- 
fin and his son Bodin, — were only so many shadows in the 
hands of the Earl. There were only about 6 manors really 
attached to the Earldom of Richmond. Of all the others, 
he was merely nominally chief lord, and each was held by 



4 WASHINGTON. 

an owner whose ancestors held for many generations before the 
Conquest. There was never in Richmondshire, above six 
families descended from Norman ancestors, and these ac- 
quired iheir lands by marrying heiresses. 

2 BoDiN, "the Monk of Richmondshire," was born at Ra- 
vensworth, Yorkshire, Eng., about 1040. He was son of 
"ToRFiN THE Dane." Bodin had issue, a son : 

3 Alet fil Bodin, born in Richmondshire about year 
1070. 
Bodin, Lord of Ravensworth, at the time of the compi- 
lation of the survey of the lands belonging to the King's 
Geld, called "Domesday Book," held Ravensworth, York- 
shire, of Alan Rufus, first Earl of Richmond, who held of 
the king. This Bodin gave all his estate to his brother 
Bardolf, and retired to the monastery o€ York, where he 
assumed the reliarious habit. 



'fa' 



2 BARDOLF, " Lord and Monk of Ravensworth," was born 
about 1045. He was second son of Torfin the Dane. 
Bardolf possessed Ravensworth with divers other fair 
lordships in Richmondshire, in the time of King William 
the Conqueror, but, desiring in his age, to end his days 
in the devout service of God, forsook the world, and, 
with his brother Bodin, took upon him the habit of a 
monk of the Abbey of St. Marie's at York. Whereunto, 
at the especial instance of Bodin, he gave the churches 
of Patrick-Brompton and Ravensworth, in pure Almes. 
To this Bardolf succeeded his son and heir : 

3 AKARIS, Lord of Ravensworth, born at Ravens- 
worth, about year 1080. He had another son : 
3 Henry, Lord of Ravensworth, born at Ravensworth, 
about year 1090. 
" The manor of Eggington, Derbyshire, was held at 
Doomsday Survey, by Azelm, under Geffrey de Alselyn, 
or Aseline. Bardolf married the heiress of Hanselyn, of 



\ 



WASHINGTON. 5 

this baronial family, and she carried the rtianor to the Bar- 
dolfs." — Valor Ecclesciasticus. 

3 Alet fil BoDiN, son of Bodin, son of Torfin the Dane, 
was born in Richmondshire, England, about 1070. 
Alet, son of Bodin, held 3 carucates of land at Bradwell 
in Essex. — Testa de Neville, p. 268. He had issue : 

4 Walter Bardolf, born in Richmondshire, about 
T130, and William de Bradwell, 2,bout 1135. 
Walter Bardolf, son of Alet, dropped out of the Pedi- 
gree by Dugdalc, was born about 1130. He is referred to 
in the Abbre Plact, 88th page. At the assize Hugo, his son, 
claimed Manton Priory, that had been given to the priors. 
He is styled as of the county of York. 

3 Henry fil Bardolf, second son of Bardolf, second son 
of " Torfin the Dane," was born at Ravensworth, county 
York, about 1090. 

3 AKARIS or Akar, oy Akary, called also Akary fil Bar- 
dolf, or Fitz Bardolph, Lord of Ravensworth, born about 
1080, first son of Bardolf, Lord and Monk of Ravensworth, 
in Richmondshire, second son of " Torfin the Dane." 
" And Bardolf, whose son Akar was the pious founder of 
'Jourvaulx,' a famous Abbey of the Cisterian order in 
the Northern Tract." 

" To this Bardolf succeeded Akaris, his son and heir, who 
in 5 Stephen, 1 139, founded an Abbey at Fors, in Wens- 
lay-dale in Com. Ebor, then called the ' Abbey of Charity.' 
He departed this life in Ann. 1161, 7 Henry H." Dugdale's 
Baronage^ vol. i, p. 403. He gave 3 carucates of land in 
Wharton, and i carucate and a half in Fors, to the abbey, 
where he was buried, leaving nine sons, of whom only five 
are mentioned : 

4 Hervey Fitz Akaris, born at Kirkby Ravensworth, 

about 1 1 20. 
4 Walter fil Akaris, born at Kirkby Ravensworth, 
about 1 122. 



6 WASHINGTON. 

4 Robert fil «^kery de Ashton, born at Kirkby Ra- 

vensworth, about 1125. 
4 Heresculfus fil Akery, born at Kirkby Ravens- 
worth, about 1 127. 
4 BoNDO FiTz Akaris, born at Kirkby Ravensworth, 

about 1 130. 
" Akaris was one of the great Vassals of Stephen, Earl of 
Richmond, and, as such, appears upon the great Pipe Rolls 
in ist Henry 2 (1154). He was the father of Hervey fil 
Akary, who was Lord of Ravensworth, and ancestor of the 
Lords Fitz Hugh of that place, and of Bondo, Lord of Oual- 
sington, juxta Ravensworth, which was given to him by 
his father, temp. King Stephen." 

history of jorevaulx abbey. 

"In the time of King Stephen (1134 to 1154) Akaris son of Baidolph, 
and Nephew of Boden, (sa3-s Dugdale, in the Monasticon), was Lord of 
many possessions in Yorkshire. Having given to Peter de Ouinciano 
one Carucate and a half of Land in Waunlej^sdale at Fors, called Dela- 
grange, and three Carucatcs in Warton, where the said Peter and his 
Companions began to found an Abbey, and to erect simple edifices for 
their habitations, in A. i). 1145. This was afterward made subject to 
the Abbey of Byland, from which — A. D. 1150, an Abbot and twelve 
Monks were sent, who, A. d. 1166, on account of the poorness of the land 
and bad air were removed with consent of Hervius (or Hervey) son of 
Akaris, their original founder, to a pleasant valley upon the river Eure in 
East Witton, given to them by Conan, Duke of Brittany and Earl of Rich- 
mond, taking the bones of their founder, Akeris, and his wife, along with 
them. Their first Abbot John De Kingston, then began to build a church 
(dedicated to St. Mary) and called it Jourvaix." — Dugdale s Monasticon, 
vol. 5, p. 569. 

charter. 

charter ok land on river eure, at east witton, yorkshire. 

"Conan, Duke of Brittany and Count of Richmond, his Steward, his 
Constable, his Chamberlain and BailifTs, and all others, French and Eng- 
lish ; All take notice that I have given, and that this paper confirms the 
donation of land to Roger de Ask, which wa'^ made to certain Barons of 
mine, to the Church of St. Andrew's of Marring, and the fees of, two vil- 



WASHINGTON. 7 

iains, neai the termination of the Barony, and me and my heirs do grant 
and give and confirm in Wood, in field, in pasture, in moor or water, 
in crop or in seed, and all other places in and belonging to the Barony. 
I prohibit the Churchmen or Laymen, and all others from disturbing or 
molesting the grantees, nor any other man shall receive it for debt. And 
I command all the Barons of mine and all others in love and duty to see 
this maintained. If any do injury, I command all ministers to see that 
full redress be made. Witnessed b}^ Henry fil Acheris, Alan the Con- 
stable, Walter fil Acheris, NigcUo the Chamberlain, Henry son of Hcnrj', 
■Conan de Ask, Thomas his brother, Radulpho the Chamberlain, and 
man}^ others. Given at Richmond." Seal of white wax, (dependent by a 
silk string), a Knight on horseback. 

This was Conan the 4th, Duke of Richmond, called le Petit, grantor of 
Jourvaux Abbe3% whose founders were sons of Bardolf and Bodin. 

This is the territory granted to the Monks on River 
Eure at East Witton, where they removed in 1166 from 
Wandleysdale, the original site of Jourvaulx Abbey. St. 
Mary's and St. Andrew's were the same as Jourvavilx Ab- 
bey, with only change of locality. 

4 Hervey fil Akary, first son of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane, was born about 11 20 at 
Ravensworth. He was Lord of Raven sworth, in the 
time of Henry W. (i 154-1189). Ancestor of the fainily 
of the Lords Fitz Hugh of Ravensworth. Died 28 
Henry H. (1182). 

"Which Hervey, being a noble and good knight, and 
highly esteemed in his country, gave his assent that Conan, 
then Earl of Britanny and Richmond, should translate the 
'Abbey of Charity,' into the Fields of East Witton, and to 
place it upon the verge of the river J ore, whereupon thence- 
forth it took the name of Jorevaulx ; and caused the bones 
of Akaris, his Father, to be brought thither and there en- 
tombed ; himself and his heirs being reputed the Founders 
of that Monastery. After which, viz. in Ann. 1182 (28 
Henry H.), he departed this life, leaving issue three sons : 
Henry, Hugh and William." — Dugdalcs Baronage, vol. i, p. 
403- 



8 WASHINGTON. 

5 Henry de Ravensworth, born in Yorkshire, circa 

1160. 
5 Hugh de Ravensworth, born in Yorkshire, circa 

1165. 
5 William de Ravensworth, born in Yorkshire, circa 

1 170. Sons of Hervey fil Akery. 

literal copies from dugdale's monasticon. 

Charters of St. Andrew's Priory, in the Parish of Meer- 
ing, North Riding, County Ebor (York). Kirkby Ravens- 
worth (or Kirkly on the Hill) ; Patrick-Brompton, Aiskew 
Garritson, and Little Fleming, olwi Lemingford. 

These charters are properly ecclesiastical surveys, and 
the advent of the parties named, antedates the confirmation 
of them in the reign of Edward HI. 1327-77, The per- 
sons must be anterior to this date, who are referred to as 
the donors or grantors of the charities earlier. 

charter I. 

Hervi fili Acharil omibz see eccle saL Sciatis me dedisse t presenti 
carta confirmasse do t eccle See Marie t See Andre t monialibz in Marring 
do servientibus, nona garb d bladi Dominioz meoz quiscug ea eolat, hoz 
vidilicet et d Rauenswart d Brutii d Aicheseon t d Gurrestun t una 
crofter in Lemingford qd fuit Robti Snarri t sibi t hoibz suis in pfata ele- 
masina, manentibus comunia pascura peceribz suis in pura t perpetua 
elemasina liba t qeta ab omni serviti q sutudine t exaetione. Hie testif 
Haresculfus fil Acharie Cunano fil Elie, Robert fil Rob, d Sacles. Bondo 
d Wassigetu. 

translation. 

I, Hervey, son of Aker}' to all the sons of the church greeting. Know 
that I have given, and the present Charter of mine confirms the gift, to the 
church of St. Mar)''s and St. Andrews, the fees in Marring, and two vil- 
lains, and nine shocks of grain, and everything else, there gathered and 
other possessions, that is to say: in the Lordship of Ravensworth, in 
that of Lord Britto de Aicheseon, and in Lord Garretsuns, also one croft 
in Lemingford, that belonged to Robert Snarri, himself and heirs, in the 
said village remaining, with the common sheep-pasture, to have and to 
hold in pure and perpetual gift, free and in quiet, without any service or 
tax, lying and held by Loi'd Ravcnszuorth, Lord Brittti or Brittville of 
Aicheseon, and Lord Guerreston, and one croft in Lemingford (or Flem- 



WA SHING TON. 9 

ingford), that belonged to Robert Snarris, remaining in said village, com- 
mon, and pasture, to have and to hold b}^ said grantees, without service 
or exaction whatsoever. 

Witnessed by Herescui fil Acharie (Heresculfus de Clesby), Conan 
son of Helie, Robert son of Robert Lacelles, and Bondo Washington. — 
Collectanea Typographica et Genealogica, vol. 5, page 221. 

CHARTER II. 

Hervius fili Acarisii oibz eccle filiis sal. Sciatis me dedisse t con- 
cessisse t psenti Carta confirmasse quadraginta to Illlor acras, tre in 
Ravensward t sexdecem acras si mora d Kirkeby t comune pastura i 
eadem Mora do t scimonialibz do servientibus in Marring cu uxorc mea 
t ancessoz t successoriz meoriz. Et ut has tras habeant de me t heredibus 
meis in pura t ppetua elemosina liba t qeta ab oi servitio ab oi exactione 
et auxilio in ppetuo. 

Witnesses : Roberto Camerario Guarnerio, Henrico fil Hervei, Roger 
de Ask, t Conano de Ask, Bertra Haget, Bondo d Whasingetu. 

Note. — These grants were outside of the territory of Mccring Priorj% 
and these donations were made to the church, by the lords of the sur- 
rounding villages, who were the grandsons of the original founders, under 
the same name of Akeris and Hervie. 

TRANSLATION. 

" Hervius, son of Aker)^ To all the sons of the church sends greeting. 
Know that I have given and granted, and the present charter confirms 40 
acres and i quarter in Ravensworth, and 16 acres of meadow in Kirkb)', 
common pasturage in said meadow, given in fee tail with 2 servants in 
Marring, which my wife and daughter, and ancestors of mine held. And 
the same territor)% to be held of me and my heirs, in pure and perpetual 
gift, to hold free and unmolested, of all exaction perpetual])-. 

"Witnesses: Robert (Camorario, or) the Chamberlain, Warner, son of 
Wymer, Henry fil Herve)-, Roger de Ask, and Conan de Ask, Bertrand 
Haget, and Bondo de Whashington. — Collectanea Typographica et Gcnea- 
logica, vol. 5, 221. 

4 Walter fil Akaris, second son of Akaris, was born at 
Ravensworth, Yorkshire, about a. d. 1122. 

4 Robert fil Akery de Ashton, third son of Akaris, born 
at Kirkby, Ravensworth, York, about 1125, settled at 
Ashton, and took the name of Robert de Ashton, after 
of Shropshire. 



lo WASHINGTON. 

Aston vel Washington, the ancestor of the Aston fam- 
ily, was seated in Shropshire, and was called Aston Aer, 
known also by the name of Wheaton-Aston. The grant of 
the underwritten charter, took place, from the date of the 
York records, near Kirkby Ravensworth, 1164. This is 
quoted in the early deeds, relating to Shropshire. 

CHARTER OF ROBERT DE ASHTON. 

" Sciant as q sciunt t quit fut i t q d iu die dedicationes cimiterii de 
Estona ego Robt fil Acherii dedi deo & capelle de eade villa de Eston 
una vigata tre Sexaginta contiente and tola decima de Domino meo ei de 
nille." 

TRANSLATION. 

" Know ye who are and who were or may be, in this da}^ of the dedi- 
cation of the cemetery of Eston, that I, Robert, son of Achery, gave to 
God and the chaplain, i virgate of land containing 60 acres, and the 
whole of my tythings in the lordship of mine, in said village." 

Eston in York, near Dalton-Travers, is the locality 
whence the grantor eixianated. He is mentioned in con- 
nection with the grants to Achery, of 11 bovates of land in 
Eston to Robert Ulram, jiixta Bridlington. Witnessed by 
Roger fil Richard de Hedon, Willo de Eston, Huestachio 
Karlyle, Robert, Constable de Flemingburg, Henry fil 
Ranulf. 

Hedon refers to the town in Holderness. Bridlington 
is also in Holderness. 

4 Heresculfus fil Akery, son of Akeris, was born at Kirk- 
by Ravensworth, York, about 1130. His name appears 
as witness on a charter of Agnes, Prioress of Mari'ick 
Abbey, in 1165. He settled at Clesby, and was called 
Heresculfus de Clesby. 

In the reign of Stephen, 1134-1154, the territory of the 
County of York, Durham, Northumberland, and land ad- 
joining, was all annexed to the Earldom of Bourlogne, and 
to that of Brittany. The date of these charters belongs to 
that period. 



WASHINGTON. ii 



CHARTER OF AGNES, PRIORESS OF MARRICK. 

Endenture fait p entre Agnes, Prioress de Marrick, t Sa covent dune 
pt at Ricardus Akersmith, de Hertipole, dantre pt temoigne qu le dit 
Prioress t sa conent ont grantez t ferme lessez a dit Richard une gardeyn 
a Hertipool, jardis en le tenet. Walter Backster al fyne de XII. anns 
rendent annualment ii South. Don a Marryk le ventissime ior de May, 
Ian du Reign du Henry quint puys le Conquest premier. 

TRANSLATION. 

" Indenture made between Agnes, Prioress de Marrick, and her convent 
on one part, and Richard Ackersmith (Ackeryth), of Hertipool (Durham), 
of the other part. In testimony of which, the said Prioress and her 
convent have conveyed a quit claim to the said Richard, a garden at 
Hertipool, leased anciently by Walter Backster, to the extent of 12 ells, 
paying annually 11 shillings. Done at Marring, the 20th of May, the 
year of the Reign of Henry, one hundred years from the first conquest." 

Witnesses : Heresculfus fil Achery ; Conan, son of Helia, Robert, ' 
son of Robert de Lasscelles ; Bond de Wassigetu. [Seal gone.] 

This would bring the period to a precise agreement 
with the advent of Agnes, a few months after the death of 
Stephen, 1165. 

4 HONDO fil Akaris, a younger son of Akaris, was born 
at Ravensworth about 11 22. Lord of Wessyngton, juxta 
Ravensworth, Richmondshire Co., York, which manor 
was given to him by his father in the time of King Henry 
II. (1154 to 1 189). He is called sometimes Bondo de 
Washington, and sometimes Bondo de Ravensworth. 
These two places join each other. His sons were : 

5 William fil Bondo, born at Wassington about 1150. 

5 CoNAN DE Washington, born at Wassington about 

II55- 

5 Walter fil Bondo, born at Washington about 1160. 

5 Ralph fil Bondo de Ravensworth, born at Wash- 
ington about 1 165. 

5 Robert de Washington, born at Washington about 
1170. 



1 2 WA SHING TON. 

LATIN TEXT OF CHARTER OF BONDO. 

Omibz see eccle filiis Bondo de Wassingetun Sat. Sciatas me dedisse 
t psenti carta confirmasse do t scimonialib sci Andree d Marring q'cessu 
dui mei Hervio filii Acarissi t concessu heredu meoz dimidia carrucata 
tre i Wassbigetti t unn toftu cu qu tofta ad pdicta tra ptinent. Et hauc 
dinnida carrucata tre do t concede eis in pura t ppetua elemosina libam 
t q'eta ab oi Servitio t ab oi q'suetudine t exactione in basco i piano i 
prato i aqra t pascius in viss t Semitis t oib locis eid ville p tinentibz. 
His testib. Hervie fil Acarissi t Heneric fil ei, Robt et Lasscelles t Gerard 
fil ci, Rogeri d Ask, Will fil Bondo, t plures alii. Qui" sine sigillo, fui cu 
hauc donative face hauc eata Sigillo dui mei Hervei Sigillavi. 

TRANSLATION. 
CHARTA OF BONDO DE WYSSINGTON. 

WASHTON YORK. 

To all of the Sons of the Church, greeting. 

Know that I, Bondo de Wassington, have given, and the present 
charta confirms the gift, the fees of Marring, which the Lord Hervey son of 
Acery gave my heirs. One half a earrucate of land in Wyssington, and 
one toft belonging to the aforesaid territory. And this half a earrucate of 
land is given in pure and perpetual charity, free of all service and of an}' 
tax whatsoever, in plain, or meadow, or pasture, and in crop or in seed, 
or water, in an)' place belonging to said village. 

Witnesses : Hervey, son of Ackery, Henry, his son, Robert de Las- 
celles, Gerard, his son, Roger de Ask, William, son of Bond, and others. 

In a historical sense nothing could be more interesting. 
This is the first instance where the name of Wassington is 
mentioned in early annals. 

4 Walter Bardolf, younger son of Alet fil Bodin, son 
of Bodin, son of Torfin the Dane, was born in Richmond- 
shire about 1 130. He is referred to in the abbreviated 
Plact., page 88. He had issue : 

5 Hugo fil Walter, born in Richinondshire about 1160. 

5 Henry fil Hervey de Ravensworth, first son of Her- 
vey fil Akary, see page 7, first son of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Ravens- 
worth, Yorkshire, about 1160. 



WASHINGTON. 13 

"Which Henry took to wife Alice, the daughter of Ran- 
dolf Fitz-Walter (ancestor to the Barons of Greistoke), with 
whom he had the lordship of Mikelton, and service of Guy 
de Bovencourt, for certain lands there and in Northumber- 
land ; as also the services of Lonton and Thirngarth, with 
the forest of Loun and free chase, and departed this life 
in An. 1201 (3 John), leaving issue." He was the ancestor 
of the Fitz-Hugh family of England. 

CHARTA. 

Henry fil Hervius de Wyssington of Hinton, 1201, of Richmondshire, 
I caracute of land, in Scorton, that Walter fil Acherie, and Arkilgarde, 
gave, confirmed by Conan, Duke of Brittany, to Hervic, the aforesaid, 
and Henry and Lord Warine le Scargil, land that belonged to Nigel Caus- 
eriro, part of his estate at Middleton. — Nigelus de JVass. 

5 Hugh de Ravensworth, second child of Henry fil 
Akary, was born at Ravensworth about 1155. 

5 William de Ravensworth, third child of Henry fil 
Akary, born at Ravensworth about 11 70. 

5 William fil Bondo, first son of Bondo fil Akaris, first 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, 
was born at Wassington about 1150. He was " Lord of 
Wassington." 

" He divided his lands amongst his sons in the time of 
King John " (i 199-12 16). He was the ancestor of the fam- 
ily of Washington, of Wassington, juxta Ravensworth, 
North Riding of Yorkshire. His sons were : 

6 Henry fil William, born at Wassington about 11 75. 
6 Peter de Washington, born at Wassington about 

1178. 
6 Simon de Washington, born at Wassington about 

1 180. 
■6 EuDO fil William, born at Wassington about 1182. 



14 WASHINGTON. 

6 William de Washington, born at Wassington about 

1185. 
6 Gilbert de Washington, born at Wassington about 

1190. 

5 CoNAN DE Washington, second son of Bondo fil Akaris 
(see page 11), was born at Wassington about 1155. 
" Conan accused certain parties of robbery, but died be- 
fore their trial, 6 Richard I. (1194), wliereupon they were 
acquitted." No issue. 

5 WALTER fil BONDO DE WASHINGTON, third son of 
Bondo fil Akaris, was born at Wassington about 1160. 

"Walter vv'as Lord of Milburn in Westmoreland, in 
right of his wife Agnes, in the time of King John " (1199- 
1216). " Walter de Washington acquired large estates in 
the counties of Northumberland and Westmoreland, in 
right of his wife Agnes, Lady of Milburn, daughter and 
heiress of Ivo de Welleburne, county Westmoreland, and 
resided at Welleburne, in Westmoreland." 
He had issue by wife Agnes : 
6 Robert de Washington, born at Welleburne about 

1195- 
6 William de Washington, born at Welleburne about 

1200. 
" His second wife Julianna, who survived him, claimed 
dower in his estates, and was living, 30 Henry HI. (1245). 
She claimed dower in the lands of her husband, in North- 
umberland and Westmoreland, and amongst others, she 
claimed, against Robert de Washington, the third part of 
the manor of Milleburne (or Welleburne), county West- 
moreland, 20 Henry HI." (1245). 

5 Ralph fil Bondo de Ravenswarth, fourth son of Bondo 
fil Akaris, was born at Wassington about 1165. 
"In 13 Henry HI. (1228), Ralph de Ravenswarth was 

fined for default." He died without issue. 



WASHINGTON. 15 

5 Robert de Washington, fifth son of Bondo fil Akaris, 

was born at Wassington about 11 70. 

" From Robert de Washington descended a younger 
branch of the family of Washington juxta Ravensworth."" 

" He was defendant, with Brian fil Alan, at the suit of 
Eudo de Stanwigges, who claimed common of pasture at 
Stanwigges, against them, 3 Henry HI." (1218). Robert de 
Washington had issue : 

6 Alan de Washington, born at Wassington about 

1195- 
6 Galfridus de Washington, born at Wassington 

about 1200. 

6 Nicholas de Washington, born at Wassington 

about 1205. 

5 Hugo fil Walter, son of Walter Bardolf, son of Alet, 
son of Bodin, son of Torfin the Dane, was born in county 
Richmond about 1160. 

" At the assize he claimed Meanton Priory that had been 
given to the priors. He is styled as of the county of 
York." 

He is also described as of Suffolk temp. John, 1199— 
1215. He had issue : 

6 Thomas fil Hugo, born in Suffolk, about 1200. 

6 Thomas fil Hugo, son of Hugo fil Walter, son of Walter 
Bardolf, son of Alet, son of Bodin, son of Torfin the 
Dane, was born in Suffolk county, about 1200. 

He is mentioned as of Suffolk, 3 Edward I. (1276). 

6 Randolf de Ravensworth, first son of Hervey, first of 
Hervey, first of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane, was born at Ravensworth, Yorkshire, about 
1 190. He died 1262, 49 Henry HI., and was buried in 
the Abbey of Jourvaulx. Married Alice, daughter and 
heir of Adam de Staveley, Lord of Staveley, Dent and 
Sadbergh. He had issue : 



j6 WASHINGTON. 

7 Henry de Ravensworth, born at Ravensworth, 

about 1 2 20. 
7 Adam de Ravensworth, bora at Ravensworth, 

about 1225. 

6 Henry de Washington, first son of William de Washing- 
ton, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane, wras born at Wassington, 
about 1 175. 

" He was seized of one half the Manor of Washington 
juxta Ravensworth, except one carucate and two bovates 
of land, by the gift of his father, temp. King John " 
(i 199-12 16). 

" Having with Stephen, the chaplain's son, beheaded 
two thieves between Marwood and Langdale, county 
York, they were arrested at York to answer the king for 
that act," 15 Henry HI. (1230). He had issue : 

7 Ranulph. de Washington, born at Wassington, 

about 1 2 10. 
7 Henry de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1215. 
7 EuDO de Washington, born at Wassington, about 
1220. 

6 Peter de Washington, second son of William de Wash- 
ington, born at Wassington, about 11 78. 
*'■ He was seized of lands in Dalton Travers, Lanca- 
shire, 25 Henry HI." (1240). He had issue : 

7 John de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1215. 
7 Robert de Washington, born at Wassington, about 
1220. 

•6 Simon de Washington, third son of William de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, about 11 80. 
"He had lands in Washington by gift of his fatliei,. 10 

John " (1208). 



WASHINGTON. 17 

6 EuDO DE Washington, fourth son of William de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1182. 
" He had one half of the Manor of Washington by gift 
of his father. He died before 35 Henry HI." (1249). His 
wife was Alice, sister to Hugh fil Ranulph, Lord of Ra- 
vensworth. He had issue : 

7 Alicia de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1220. 
7 Henry de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1222. 
7 Michael de Washington, born at Wassington, 

York, about 1225. 
7 John de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1230. 
7 William de Washington, born at Wassington, 

York, about 1232. 
7 Robert de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 1235. 

6 William de Washington, fifth son of William de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, about 11 85. 
" He was defendant in a plea of trespass, 3, 4 Henry 
HI." (1249). He had issue : 

7 Thomas de Washington, born at Wassington, about 
1230. 

d Gilbert de Washington, sixth son of William de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, about 1190. 
" He was surety for his cousin John fil Eudo de Wash- 
ington, 30 Henry HI." (1245). 

6 ROBERT DE WASHINGTON, first son of Walter fil Bondo 
de Washington, fpurth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second ^f Torfin, was born at Wellebourne, 
in Westmoreland, Eng., about 1195. 
" Robert de Washington, Lord of Milleburne, county 



i8 WA SHING TON. 

Westmoreland, in right of his mother, 3 Henry III. (12 18), 
against whom Juliana (who was his step-mother), second 
wife of his father, Walter de Washington, claimed the 
third part of the Manor of Welleburne, as her dower, 30 
Henry HI." (1245). 

" He was seized of divers lands in Strickland Ketell, 
county Westmoreland, by gift of Walter de Strickland, 
Chevalier, and Elizabeth, his wife, in free marriage with 
Johanna, their daughter." 

His wife's mother, Elizabeth, was daughter and heiress 
of Sir Ralph Deincourt, Knt. He had issue : 

7 Robert de Washington, born at Milleburne, about 
1230. 

6 William de Washington, called William de Wessington, 
second son of Walter fil Bondo de Washington, was 
born at Welleburne, or Milburne, Westmoreland, about 
1200. 

" He is said to have held the Manor of Wessyngton, 
alias Washington, county Durham, of the Bishop of Dur- 
ham, II Henry HI." (1226). 

"In the 13th John (1212), he paid the king 40 marks to 
marry Alicia, the widow of John de Lexington, and was 
allowed 10 marks for 2 palfreys. He was at the battle of 
Lewes, in 1264." He had issue : 

7 William de Washington, born at Wessyngton, Dur- 
ham, about 1230. 
7 Thomas Washington, born at Wessyngton, Durham, 

about 1235. 
7 John Washington, born at Wessyngton, Durham, 

about 1240. 
7 Simon de Washington, born at Wessyngton, Dur- 
ham, about 1245. 
"About 1260 occurred the wars of the Barons, during 
which the throne of Henry III. was shaken by the De 
Montforts. The chivalry of the Palatinate rallied under 



WASHINGTON. 19 

the Royal standard. On the list of the loyal knights who 
fousfht for their sovereign in the disastrous battle of Lewes 
(1264), in which the king was taken prisoner, we find the 
name of William de Washington." — Hutchhisoris Hist. 
Durham, vol. i, p. 220. 

6 Alan de Washington, first son of Robert de Washing- 
ton, fifth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin, was born at Wassington, about 1195. 
"He was defendant in a plea of trespass, 5 Henry HI." 
(1220). He had issue : 

7 Alan de Washington, born at Wassington, county 

York, about 1230. 
7 Alicia de Washington, born at Wassington, county 

York, about 1235. 
7 Johanna de Washington, born at Wassington, 
county York, about 1240. 

6 Galfridus de Washington, second son of Robert de 
Washington, born at Wassington, about 1225. 
He was living, 35 Henry HI. (1250). 

6 Nicholas de Washington, third child of Robert de 
Washington, was born at Wassington, about 1230. 

He was living, 35 Henry HI. (1250). 

7 Henry de Ravensworth, first son of Randolf, first of 
Henry, first of Hervey fil Akary, first of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Ravens- 
worth, York, about 1220. 

" Which Henry had also issue two sons, Randolf, who 
died issueless, and Hugh, who succeeded his brother Ran- 
dolf, in the inheritance, died at Berewyk, upon Teise, upon 
the fourth ides of March, An. 1304 (32 Ed. I.), and was 
buried at Rurnaldkirk. But Albreda, his wife, departing 
this life at Harworth upon Teise, had sepulture at Jore- 



20 . WASHINGTON. 

vaulx, near to the grave of Henry Fitz-Randolf, her hus- 
band's father." 

8 Randolf de Ravensworth, born at Raven sworth, 

about 1245. Died s. p. 
8 Hugh de Ravensworth, born at Ravensworth, about 
1250. 

7 Adam de Ravensworth, second son of Henry, was born 
at Ravensworth, York, about 1225. 

7 Ranulph de Washington, first son of Henry de Wash- 
ington, first of William de Washington, first of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Wassington, about 1200. 
" He claimed half the Manor of Washington, against 
Robert fil Eudo de Washington, 35 Henry HI." (1250). 

" He claimed lands in Washington against Robert 
Warde and Alicia, his wife (daughter of Eudo de Wash- 
ington, and sister of above Robert), in 52 Henry HI." 
(1267). 

" He claimed 100 acres of wood, in Washington, of 
which William fil Bondo de Washington, his grandfather, 
died seized, against Hugh fil Henry de Washington of 
Ravensworth, in 9 Edward I." (1282). He had issue : 

8 Henry de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1235. 
8 Alan de Washington, born at Wassington, York> 

about 1240. 
8 Adam de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 1245. 

7 Henry de Washington, second son of Henry de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, about 1205. 
" He was defendant in a plea of ' Morte Anteceperis,' 
at the suit of Henry fil Ranulph de Washington (his 
nephew), in 35 Henry HI." (1250). He had issue : 



WASHINGTON. 21 

8 Alexander de Washington, born at Wassington, 

about 1240. 
8 John de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1245- 

7 EuDO DE Washington, third son of Henry de Washing- 
ton, was born at Wassington, about 12 10, 
" He was a juryman at the trial of a plea at York, be- 
tween Hugh fil Henry de Ravensworth, and John de la 
Ware, touching common of pasture in Ravensworth, in 
9 Edward HI." (1282). 

7 John de Washington, first son of Peter de Washington, 
second of William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Dal- 
ton Travers, Lancashire, about 1205. 

" Robert de Travers claimed against him common of 
pasture, in Dalton Travers, Lancashire, in 30 Henry HI." 
(1245). Had issue, only child : 

8 Matilda, born at Dalton Travers, Lancashire, about 
1230. 

8 Matilda Washington, daughter, heiress, and only child 
of John de Washington, first of Peter^ second of Wil- 
liam, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Dalton Travers, 
Lancashire, about 1230. 

She married in 1252, James, son of and successor to 
Sir Robert Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, Lancashire, whose 
father. Sir Robert, accompanied the lion-hearted Richard 
to Palestine, and distinguished himself at the siege of 
Acre, in 1191, was made Knight Banneret, and obtained 
for his arms "Argent, a cross raguly gules." James Law- 
rence acquired by his marriage the Manor of Washington 
(changed from Dalton), Sedgwick, &c., in that county. His 
son and successor was : 



zz . WASHINGTON. 

John Lawrence, who levied a fine of Washington and 
Sedgwick, in 1283. He married Margaret, daughter 
of Walter Chesford, and was father of 

John Lawrence, who presented to the church of 
Washington, in 1326, and died about 1360, leav- 
ing by Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of Holt of 
Stably, Lancashire, a son and heir : 

Sir Robert Lawrence, Knt., who married 
Margaret Holden of Lancashire, and had 
four sons, viz. : 

1 Sir Robert, his son and heir. 

2 Thomas, whose son Arthur was ances- 
tor of Sir John Lawrence, of Chelsea, 
who was created a Baronet in 1628. 
Now extinct. 

3 William, born 1395, served in France, 
and afterward joining Lionel, Lord 
Welles, fought under the Lancastrian 
banner at St. Albans, in 1455, where he 
was slain, and buried in the Abbey 
Church. 

4 Edward, born about 1400. 

7 Robert de Washington, second of Peter de Washing- 
ton, born at Dalton Travers, about 12 10. 
" He was defendant in a plea of trespass in 7 Edward 

I." (1280). 

7 Alicia de Washington, first child of Eudo de Wash- 
ington, fourth of William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at 
Wassington, York, about 1220. 
" Her father gave her lands in Washington juxta Ra- 

•vensworth." . 

She married Robert Ward, of Washington juxta Ra- 

vensworth. Children in his line : 



WASHINGTON. 23 

7 Henrv fil EuDO DE Washington, second child of Eudo 
de Washington, was born at Wassington, York, about 
1222. 

" He was defendant in a plea of land at the suit of his 
brother John, 28 Henry HI." (1243). His son was : 

8 Roger fil Henry de Washington, was born at Was- 
sington, York, about 1245. He was living, 50 Henry 
ni. (1265). His son was : 

9 Henry fil Roger de Washington, born at Was- 
sington, York, about 1270. He was living, 
30 Edward I. (1303), 2 Edward II. (1309), 4 Ed- 
ward HI. (1330). His son was : 

10 Roger fil Henry de Washington, born at 
Wassington, York, about 1300. He was de- 
fendant conjointly with Warren de Wash- 
ington in a plea touching lands in Neusam, 
7 Edward III. (1333), and in a plea of debt, 
30 Edward III. (1356). 

7 Michael fil Eubo de Washington, third child of Eudo 
de Washington, was born at Wassington, York, about 
1235. He was living, 50 Henry III. (1265). 

7 John fil Eudo de Washington, fourth child of Eudo de 
Washington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1230. 
He devised one bovat of land in Ravensworth, &c., 
against his brothers Henry and William, 28 Henry III. 
(1243). His son was : 

8 Warren fil John de Washington, born at Was- 
sington, York, about 1255. He was attorney and 
chief steward to Henry fil Henry, Lord of Ravens- 
worth, 21 Edward I. (1294), and died 10 Edward II. 

(1317)- 

"7 William fil Eudo de Washington, fifth child of Eudo 
de Washington, was born at Wassington, York about 



■«4 ' ' WASHINGTON. 

1232. He was defendant in a plea of land at the suit of 
his brother John, 28 Henry HI. (1243). His children 
were : 

8 John fil William de Washington, born at Was- 

sington, York, about 1255. He was seized of lands 

at Washington, 8 Edward H. (1315). His son was : 

9 William de Washington, born at Wassington^ 

York, about 1280. He claimed the arrears of aa 

annual rent of eight marks against Robert le 

Constable of Hamburgh, county York, Knt., 19 

Edward n. (1326). He died i Edward HI. (1327). 

He married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert le 

Constable of Hamburgh, county York, Knt. She 

was living at the time of her husband's death^ 

1327. 

8 Elena, second child, was born at Wassington, 

York, about 1260. She married 19 Edward I. (1292). 

William fil William fil Abraham de Aldborough. 

7 Robert de Washington, sixth child of Eudo de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1235. 
" He was under age in 35 Henry HI. (1250), and in the 
custody of his uncle Henry, his mother's brother, fil 
Ranulph de Ravensworth, when his cousin Ranulph fil 
Henry de Washington claimed against him and his mother 
Alicia, half the Manor of Washington juxta Ravensworth." 
" He married Isolda, daughter of Robert Werry, of 
Dalton Travers." She was a widow 20 Edward I. (1293). 
He had issue : 

8 Robert de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1255- 
8 Stephen de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1257- 
8 Isolda de Washington, born at Wassington, about 

1260. 



WASHINGTON. 25 

7 Thomas de Washington, first son of William de Wash- 
ington, fifth of William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris. 
second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Wassington, 
York, about 1230. 

" He was seized of lands in Washington juxta Ravens- 
worth, in 20 Edward I." (1293). He had issue : 

8 Walter de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1265. 
8 Thomas de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1270. 
8 John de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 

about 1275. 
8 William de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 1280. 

7 ROBERT DE WASHINGTON, Lord of Welleburne, county 
Westmoreland, first son of Robert de Washington, first 
of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Milburne, 
or Welleburne, county Westmoreland, circa 1230. 
" Son and heir, was seized of a capital messuage and 
divers lands in Kerneford, in county of Lancaster, in right 
of his wife, where he resided, 29 Edward I." (1302). 

" He married Amercia, daughter and heir of Hugh de 
Kerneford, Lady Kerneford, county Lancaster," by whom 
he had issue : 

8 John de Washington, born at Welleburne, about 

1260. 
8 Robert de Washington, born at Welleburne, about 
1265. 

7 William de Washington, first son of William de Wash- 
ington, second of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was 
born at Wassington, county Durham, about 1230. 
" William de Washington, or Wessyngton, of Wash- 



26 WASHINGTON. 

ington, county Durham, to whom his father gave half the 
Manor of Halton Fletham, county Westmoreland, 6 Ed- 
ward I." (1279), was living 29 Edward I. (1302). He was 
living 29 Edward I. (1302). He had issue : 

8 Robert de Washington, born at Wessington, Dur- 
ham, about 1260. 

7 Thomas Washington, of Usseworth, Durham, sec- 
ond son of William de Washington, born at Wessing- 
ton, county Durham, about 1235. 

" He was living at Usseworth, county Durham, 28 Ed- 
ward I." (1301). 

" He married Isabella, daughter and co-heir of James 
de Usseworth, county Durham." He had issue. 

7 John Washington, third son of William de Washington, 
was born at Wessington, county Durham, about 1240. 
" To whom his father gave half the Manor of Helton 
Fletham, county Westmoreland. He was living 29 Edward 
I." (1302). He had issue : 

8 Walter Washington, born at Wessington, Durham, 

about 1270. 
8 Johanna Washington, born at Wessington, Durham, 
about 1275, 

7 Simon de Washington, fourth son of William de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wessington, county Durham, about 

1245- 

" He was of Essewell, county Hertford, 19 Edward I." 

(1292). 

7 Alan de Washington, first child of Alan de Washington, 
first of Robert, fifth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin, was born at Wassington, 
county York, circa 1230. 
" Clericus, died s. p." 



WASHINGTON. 27 

7 Alicia de Washington, second child of Alan de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, county York, about 
1235. "She died before 17 Edward I." (1290). 
" She married Roger de Hertford of Washington. He 
was living 21 Edward I." (1294). Her daughter was : 

8 Alicia, born about 1260, niece and co-heir to Alan 
de Washington, 17 Edward I. (1290). She married, 
17 Edward I. (1290), Stephen de Hudderwell. Had 
issue, given in his line. 

7 Johanna de Washington, third child of Alan de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1240. 

She died before 17 Edward I. (1290). She married 
Roger de Scargill. Had issue : 

8 Roger fil Roger de Scargill. 

8 Randolf de Ravensworth, first child of Henry de 
Ravensworth, first of Randolf, first of Henry, first of 
Hervey, first of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane, was born at Ravensworth, York, about 1245. 
He was heir to the inheritance of the Ravensworth es- 
tates, and died without issue. He was succeeded by his 
brother Hugh. 

8 Hugh de Ravensworth, second child of Henry, born at 

Ravensworth, about 1250, d. 1304. 

He succeeded his brother Randolf in the inheritance, 
see above. He had issue : 

9 Henry de Ravensworth, born at Ravensworth, 
about 1275. 

8 Henry de Washington, first son of Ranulph de Wash- 
ington, first of Henry, first of William, first of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Wassington, York, about 1235. 
He claimed lands in Washington against Thomas 



28 WA SHIiVG TON. 

Godgram and others, 17 Edward I. (1290), and 3 Edward 
II. (1310). He had issue : 

9 Ranulph de Washington, born at Wassington, 

York, about 1270. 
9 Hugh de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 1275. 

8 Alan de Washington, second son of Ranulph de Wash- 
ington, born at Wassington, York, about 1240. 
He was killed by a fall from his horse at Wassington, 

juxta Ravensworth, 7 Edward I. (1280). 

8 Adam de Washington, third son of Ranulph de Wash- 
ington, born at Wassington, York, about 1245. 
He held lands in Lastington of John fil Henry de Ra- 
vensworth, 20 Edward I. (1293). He had issue : 

9 Joanna, daughter and heir, born at Lastington, about 
1280. She married about 1300, Hugh de Lastington. 
He was seized of lands in Lastington, in right of his 
wife. Had issue. 

8 Alexander de Ravensworth, first son of Henry de 
Washington, second of Henry, first of William, first of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane, born at Wassington, York, about 1240. 
He was surety for William de Hertford, 21 Edward I. 

(1294). 

8 John de Washington, second son of Henry de Washing- 
ton, born at Wassington, York, about 1245. 
He was living, 21 Edward I. (1294). 

8 Roger de Washington, son of Henry de Washington, 
second child of Eudo de Washingon, fourth of William, 
first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second 
of Torfin the Dane, was born at Wassington, York, about 



J FA SHI.YG TON. ?9 

1250. He was living, 50 Henry HI. (1265). Had issue : 
9 Henry de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
i^bout 1280. 

3 Warren de Washington, son of John de Washington, 
fourth child of Eudo, fourth of William, first of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Wassington, York, about 1260. 
He was attorney and chief steward to Henry fil Henry, 
Lord of Ravensworth, 21 Edward I. (1294), and died 10 
Edward II. (1317). He had issue. 

9 Alicia, born at Wassington, York, about 1290, eldest 
daughter and co-heir. Was living 18 Edward III. 
(1355). Married John de Laton, of West Laton, 
county York. He was living, 18 Edward III. (1355). 
Had issue. 
9 Agnes, born at Wassington, York, about 1295, second 
daughter and co-heir. Was living in 18 Edward III. 
(1355). She married Thomas Roter, of Wessington. 
He was living in iS Edward III. (1355). Had issue. 
9 Matilda, born at Wassington, York, about 1297, third 
dauarhter and co-heir. Was living in 18 Edward III. 

(1355)- 

9 Elizabeth, born at Wassington, York, about 1300, 
fourth daughter and co-heir. Was living in 18 
Edward III. (1355)- 

8 John de Washington, first child of William, fifth of 
Eudo, fourth of William, first of Bondo, first of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born 
at Wassington, York, about 1255. 

He was seized of lands in AVashington in 8 Edward II. 
(1315). He had issue : 

9 William de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 1280. 



30 WASHINGTON. 

8 Robert de Washington, first child of Robert, sixth of 
Eudo, fourth of William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was Jjorn at 
Wassington, York, about 1255. 
He was surety for William 'de Hertford, 26 Edward L 

(1298). 

8 Stephen de Washington, second child of Robert de 
Washington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1257. 
He was seized of i messuage and i bovate of land witb 
the appurtenances, in Washington, 20 Edward I. (1293). 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of John de Ulvington, of 
Washington juxta Ravensworth. He had issue : 

9 Adam de Washington, born at Wassington, York^ 
about 1285. 

8 IsoLDA DE Washington, third child of Robert de Wash- 
ington, born at Wassington, York, about 1260. She was 
living in 7 Edward I. (1280). 

She married William fil Alicia de Neusum, who was 
seized of lands in Dalton Travers, in right of his wife, by- 
gift of her father, in 7 Edward I. (1280). Had issue. 

8 Walter de Washington, first son of Thomas, first of 
William, fifth of William, first of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was 
born at Wassington, York, about 1265. 
He was living 30 Edward (1302). 

8 Thomas DE Washington, second son of Thomas de Wash- 
ington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1268. 
He was living 23 Edward I. (1296). 

8 John de Washington, third son of Thomas de Washing- 
ton, was born at Wassington, York, about 1270. 
He was living 23 Edward I. (1296). 



WASHINGTON. 31 

8 William de Washington, fourth son of Thomas de 
Washington, was born at Wassington, York, about 1272. 
He was living 23 Edward I. (1296). 

8 John de Washington, first son of Robert de Washing- 
ton Lord Milleburne, first of Robert, first of Walter,. 
• fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf^ 
second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Milburne or 
Welleburne, county Westmoreland, about 1260. 
He was the son and heir of Robert, Lord Milburne, and 
ancestor of the Washington family of Welleburne, Hull- 
hede, Barton and Shappe, county Westmoreland ; the lat- 
ter branch being the ancestors of the Washingtons of Ard- 
wich le Street, county York. He was of Milburne, 30 Ed- 
ward I. (1303), and 10 Edward H. (1317). He had issue: 
9 Peter de Washington, born at Milburne, West- 
moreland, about 1300. 
9 John de Washington, born at Milburne, Westmore- 
land, about 1305. 

8 ROBERT WASHINGTON, second son of F^bert de Wash- 
ington, was born at Welleburne, county Westmoreland,, 
about 1265, and removed to Kerneford, county Lan- 
caster. 

He was second son, upon whom his father and mother 
settled in fee tail the lands of Kerneford, county Lan- 
caster. He took part with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and 
was pardoned 12 Edward H. (1319). 

He married Agnes, daughter and heir of Adam Derling, 
bywhom he had issue : 

9 Robert Washington, born at Kerneford, county 

Lancaster, about 1300. 
9 John Washington, born at Kerneford, caunty Lan- 
caster, about 1305. 
9 Thomas Washington, born at Kerneford, county 
Lancaster, about 13 10. 



32 WASHINGTON. 

9 William Washington, born at Kerneford. county 
Lancaster, about 13 15. 

8 Robert de Washington, first son of William de Wash- 
ington, first of William, second of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane, was born at Wessyngton, Durham, about 1260. 
He was living in 6 and 10 Edward II. (1313-1317), and i 
Edward III. (1327). He had issue : 

9 Sir William de Washington, born at Wessyngton, 
Durham, about 1300. 

8 Walter Washington, first child of John, third of Wil- 
liam, second of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at 
Wessyngton, Durham, about 1270, and removed to Hel- 
ton Fletham, county Westmoreland, where he was liv- 
. ing I Edward III. (1327). 

His first wife was Alicia, who bore one child. His sec- 
ond wife, Elizabeth, was administratrix to his will. 

Christina, his daughter and heir, married Sir Roger de 
Blakiston, of •Blakiston, county Durham. Had issue, 
given in his line. 

8 Johanna Washington, second child of John Washing- 
ton, was born at Wessyngton, county Durham, about 

1275- 

She had the Manor of Benwell, in the county of Nor- 
thumberland. She was married to Robert de Whitchester. 

9 Lord Henry de Ravensworth, first son of Hugh, second 
of Henry, first of Randolf, first of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Ravens- 
worth, York, about 1275. 

" To Hugh succeeded his son Henry, who being called 
Henry Fitz-Hugh, gave the first occasion for all his de- 
scendants to assume that sirname, and in 3 Edward II. 



WASHINGTON. 33 

{13 10), was in that expedition made into Scotland. So, 
liliew'ise, in 4 Edward II. (131 1), and in 8 Edward II. (1315) 
In consideration of wliich services and great expenses 
therein, the King gave him the sum of four hundred marlcs, 
to be received at the hands of Eleanor, the widow of Henry 
Lord Percy, she being indebted to the Exchcqvier in the 
like sum. Moreover, in 9 Edward II. (1316) he was con- 
stituted Governor of Bernard Castle, in the Bishoprick of 
Durham, by reason of the Earl of Warwick's minority, it 
being of his inheritance, and in 10 and 11 Edward II. 
{1317 and 1318), having again been employed in the Scot- 
tish wars, was in 14 Edward II. (132 1) first summoned to 
Parliament amongst tlie Barons of this Realm. 

" In 20 Edward II. (1327) having a debt of five hundred 
marks due to him from Sir Henry Vavasor, Knight ; he 
•did by a special instrument under his seal, acquit the same 
Henry thereof, upon condition that Henry le Vavasor, son 
to the same Henry, should take to wife Annabil, his 
daughter. In 7 Edward III. (1333) he was again in the 
Scottish wars, so likewise in 8 and 9 Edward III. (1334-5). 

" And having married Eve, the daughter of Sir John 
Bulmer, Knight, left issue by her, Henry, his son and heir, 
which Henry took to wife Joane, the daughter of Sir Rich- 
ard Fourneys, Knight ; sister and heir of William, with 
whom he had the Lordships of Carleton, Ringstone, Begh- 
ton and Bothomfall, and left issue by her two sons, viz. : 
Hugh and Henry, which Hugh having wedded Isabel, the 
daughter of Ralph Lord Neyill, died v/ithout issue." 

9 Ranulph'de Washington, first son of Henry de Washing- 
ton, first of Ranulph, first of Henry, first of William, 
first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second 
of Torfin the Dane, was born at Wassington, York, 
about 1270. 
He was defendant in a plea of land, 16 Edward III. (1342). 

He had issue : 
3 



34 WASHINGTON. 

lo Alexander de Washington, born at Wassington, 
York, about 1300. 

9 Hugh de Washington, second of Henry de Washing- 
ton, was born at Wassington, York, about 1275. 
He was one of the defendants with Adam de Bowes and 
others, at the suit of Hugh de Ask, for forcibly seizing his 
cattle and goods at Richmond, 3 Edward HI. (1329). Plain- 
tiff in a plea of accounts against John de Huddeswell and 
John de Watts, 36 Edward HI. (1357). 

9 Henry de Washington, first son gf Roger, first of Henry, 
second of Eudo, fourth of William, first of Bondo, sec- 
ond of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Wassington, York, about 1280. 

He was named 30 Edward I. (1303), 2 Edward H. 
(1309), 4 Edward HI. (1330). He had issue: 

10 Roger de Washington, born at Wassington, York, 
about 13 10. 

9 William de Washington, first son of John de Washing- 
ton, first of William, fifth of Eudo, fourth of William, 
first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second 
of Torfin the Dane, was born at Wassington, York, 
about 1285. 

He claimed arrears of an annual rent of eight marks, 
against Sir Robert le Constable, of Hamburg^i, county 
York, Knt., 19 Edward H. (1326). He died i Edward HI. 
(1327). He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Robert le 
Constable, of Hamburgh, county York, Knt. She was liv- 
ing I Edward HI. (1327). He had issue. 

9 Adam de Washington, first son of Stephen, second of 
Robert, sixth of Eudo, fourth of William, first of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Wassington, York, about 1285. 



WASHINGTON. 35 

He claimed lands in Washington juxta Ravensworth, 
against Elizabeth, wife of John de Ulvington, 10 Edward 
III. (1336). He had issue. 

Xp Peter de Washington, first son of John, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Welleburne, county Westmoreland, 
about 1300. 

He claimed his wife's dower in her first husband's lands, 
in Strickland, 23 Edward HI. (1349). 

He married Matilda, widow of William L'Engleys, of 
Strickland. He had issue : 

10 John de Washington, born at Welleburne, county 

Westmoreland, about 1323. 
10 Roger de Washington, born at Welleburne, county 
. Westmoreland, about 1325. 

9 John Washington, second son of Peter de Washing- 
ton, was born at Welleburne, county Westmoreland, about 
1305, and removed to Barton, county Westmoreland. 
He was defendant in a plea of trespass, 2^6 Edward HI. 

(1362). 

9 Robert Washington, first child of Robert, second of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane, was born at Kerneford, county Lancaster, about 
1300. 

He was the eldest son, and ancestor of the Washingtons 
of Kerneford. He was living 47 Edward HI. (1373). By 
wife Margaret he had issue : 

10 Robert Washington, born at Kerneford, county 

Lancaster, about 1325. 
10 John Washington, born at Kerneford, county Lan- 
caster, about 1330. 



36 WASHINGTON. 

9 JOHN WASHINGTON, second child of Robert Washing- 
ton, was born at Kerneford, county Lancaster, about 

1305- 

He settled at Warton, county Lancaster. He married 

Alianna, daughter and heir of John de Warton, of Warton, 

in Lonesdale, county Lancaster, about year 1329, and died 

before 10 Richard II. (1386), when his widow was living at 

Warton. She was executrix of the will of William de 

Lancaster. He had issue : 

10 John Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 

about 1330. 

10 Edmund Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 

about 1340. 

9 Thomas Washington, third child of Robert Washington, 
born at Kerneford, Lancaster, about 13 10. 
He settled at Bolton, county Lancaster, was there 27 
Edward III. (1353). He had issue : 

10 Thomas Washington, born at Bolton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1340. 

9 William Washington, fourth child of Robert Washing- 
ton, was born at Kerneford, county Lancaster, about 

1315- 

He was living 26 Edward III. (1352). He had issue : 

10 William Washington, born at Kerneford, county 

Lancaster, about 1340. 

9 Sir William de Washington, Chevalier, first child of 
Robert de Washington, first of William, first of William, 
second of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Wessyngton, county Durham, Eng., about 1300. 
He was Lord of Washington, county Durham, i Ed- 
ward III. (1327), was living 47 Edward III. (1373). He had 
issue : 



\ 



WASHINGTON. 37 

10 William Washington, born at Wessington, Dur- 
ham, about 1330. 

10 Roger Washington, born at Wessington, Durham, 
about 1335. 

10 Alexander de Washington, first child of Ranulph, 
first of Henry, first of Ranulph, first of Henry, first of 
William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Wassing- 
ton, York, about 1300. 

He was defendant in a plea of trespass, at the suit of 
John Alajrn, for depasturing cattle at Washington, and in- 
juring his corn and meadow to the value of 10 marks, 3 
Richard H. (1379). He had issue : 

11 Robert de Washington, born at Wassington, 
York, about 1340. 

II William de Washington, born at Wassington, 
York, about 1345. 

10 Roger de Washington, Clericus, first of Henry, first 
of Roger, first of Henry, second of Eudo, fourth of Wil- 
liam, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the "Dane ; was born at Wassington, 
York, about 1310. 

He was defendant conjointly with Warren de Washing- 
ton, in a plea touching lands in Neusum, 7 Edward HL 
(1317), and in a plea of debt, 30 Edward HI. (1356). 

10 John de Washington, first child of Peter, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Welleburne, county Westmore- 
land, about 1323. 

He was living there, 40 Edward HI. (1366), and 21 Rich- 
ard n. (1397). He married Alicia, 40 Edward HI. (1366). 
He had issue : 



38 WASHINGTON. 

II Robert Washington, born at Milburne, Westmore- 
land, about 1350. 

10 Roger de Washington, second child of Peter, born at 
Welleburne, county Westmoreland, about 1325. 
He settled at Strickland Retell, county Westmoreland, 
was living there, 16 and 17 Richard II. (1392-3). He had 
issue : 

II Nicholas Washington, born at Strickland Ketell, 

about 1348. 
II Richard Washington, born at Strickland Ketell, 

about 1350. 
II John Washington, born at Strickland Ketell, 
about 1352. 

10 Robert Washington, first* child of Robert, first of 
Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first' of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
•second of Torfin the Dane, was born at Kerneford, 
county Lancaster, about 1325. 
He was living, there, 13 Richard II. (1389). 

30 John Washington, second child of Robert, was born at 

Kerneford, county Lancaster, about 1330. 

He removed and settled at Catton, Lincolnshire, where 
he was living 40 Edward III. (1366). 

10 JOHN WASHINGTON, first of John, second of Robert, 
second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Warton, in Lonesdale, county 
Lancaster, about 1330. 

He was living there, 26 Edward III. (1352), and 10 Rich- 
ard II. (1386), and 4 Henry IV. (1402). By wife Johanna, 
he had issue : 

II John Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1365. 



WASHINGTON. 39 

10 Edmund Washington, second of John, was born at 

Warton, county Lancaster, about 1340. 

He was plaintiff in a plea of debt, 40 Edward III. (1366). 
He was then of Warton, Lancaster. 

10 Thomas Washington, first of Thomas, third of Robert, 
first of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
•second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Bolton, county 
Lancaster, about 1340. 
He was living there, 16 Richard H. (1392). 

10 William Washington, first of William, fourth of 
Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane; was born at Kerneford, 
county Lancaster, about 1340. 

He was living there, 26 Edward IIL (1352), and 10 Rich- 
ard II. (1386). 

10 William Washington, first child of Sir William de 
Washington, Chevalier, first of Robert, first of William, 
first of William, second of 'Walter, fourth of Bondo, sec- 
ond of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane; was born at Wessyngton, county Durham, about 

1330- 

He held half the Manor of Helton Flatham, county 

"Westmoreland. He had issue : 

II William Washington, born at Wessyngton, county 
Durham, about 1365. 
"In 1350 William de Wessyngton, Lord of the Manor of 
Wessyngton, Durham, had license to settle it, and the vil- 
lage upon himself, his wife, and ' his own right heirs.' He 
"died in 1367, and his son and heir William succeeded to the 
■estate." 

10 Roger Washington, Bishop of Durham, second child 



40 WASHINGTON. 

of Sir William, was born at Wessyngton, county Dur- 
ham, about 1335. He had issue : 

11 William Washington, born at Wessington, county" 
Durham, about 1370. 

II Robert de Washington, first child of Alexander, first 
of Ranulph, first of Henry, first of Ranulph, first of 
Henry, first of William, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Wassington, York, about 1340. 
He was defendant in a plea at the suit of Richard Tekyll 

and Margaret, his wife, who claimed against him certain 

lands in Kerkan, Forrett, and Dalton Norreys, 2 Henry 

IV. (1400). He had issue. 

II William de Washington, clerk or clergyman, second 
child of Robert de Washingon, born at Wassington,. 
York, about 1345. 
He was defendant with his brother in a plea touching 2 

messuages, i toft and 2 bovats of land in Kerkan, Forrett, 

and Dalton Norreys, 2 Henry IV. (1400). 

■^ II Robert Washington, first child of John de Washing- 
ton, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Milburne, county Westmoreland, about 1350. 
He was living there, 12 Henry IV. (141 2). He had issue : 

12 John Washington, born at Milburne, about 1380. 

II Nicholas Washington, first son of Roger de Washing- 
ton, second of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Strickland Ketell, county Westmoreland, about 
1348. He was living there, 3 Henry IV. (1402). 



WASHINGTON. 41 

II Richard Washington, second of Roger, was born at 
Strickland Ketell, county Westmoreland, about 1350. 
He was living there, 3 Henry IV. (1402). 

II John Washington, third of Roger, was born at Strick- 
land Ketell, county Westmoreland, about 1352. 
He was defendant in a plea for debt, 49 Edward IH. 

(1375)- 

II JOHN WASHINGTON, first son of John, first of John, sec- 
ond of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, 
county Lancaster, about 1365. 

He was of Warton, 4 Henry IV. (1402). He was com- 
monly called "John fil John Washington." He had issue : 
12 Robert Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 

about 1400. 
12 William Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 
about 1405. 

II Sir William de Washington, Knt., first child of Wil- 
liam, first of Sir William, first of Robert, first of Wil- 
liam, first of William, second of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane ; was born at Wessyngton, county Durham, aboul 

1365- 

He married Margaret, daughter and heir of John de 
Morville. He had issue : 

12 Eleanor, daughter and heir, born at Wessyngton, 

Durham, about 1390. 

" He is mentioned as ' Sir William de Weschington.' 

His father died in 1367, when he succeeded to the Manor 

and estates of Wessyngton. He was one of the knights 

who sat in the privy council of the county during the espis- 



42 WASHINGTON. 

copate of John Fordham." — Hutchinson's Hist. Durham, 
vol. 2. • : 

" For upwards of two hundred years the de Wessyng- 
tons had sat in the councils of the Palitinate ; had mingled 
with horse and hound in the stately hunts of the Prelates, 
and followed the banner of St. Cuthbert to the field, but 
this Sir William was the last of the family that rendered 
this feudal service. He was the last male of the line to 
which the inheritance of the Manor, by the license granted 
to his father, was confined. It passed away from the de 
Wessyngtons, g,fter his death, by the marriage of his only 
daughter and heir, with Sir William Tempest, of Studley, 
county York." 

Eleanor Washington, daughter, heiress and only child 
of Sir William de Washington, of Wassington, Durham. 
Died 1451. 

She married, about 1420, Sir William Tempest of Studley, 
son of Sir Richard Tempest of StudLey (M. P. for county 
of York, 2 Henry IV. 1400). Had issue two sons : 

1 William, of Studley, who died 1444, left two daugh- 
ters, his co-heirs, viz. : 

1 Isabella, married to Richard Norton, of Nor- 
ton Conyers, in Yorkshire, and 

2 Dionysia, married to William Mallorie, to whom 
she conveyed the Manor of Studley, and from 

• this marriage the present (1833) Mrs. Lawrence 

of Studley derives. 

2 Sir Rowland, of Holmside, which he acquired by 
gift of Sir Robert Umfraville, and in 18 Henry VI. 
{1446), he also obtained lands from his brother. 
He married Isabella, daughter and co-heir of Sir 
William Elmdon, Knt. From this Sir Rowland Tem- 
pest descended the Tempests of Holmside, Stella, 
Bracepath, Wyngard, &c., in the county of Durham, 
and the Tempests in Kent. 



•\ 



WA SHING TON. 43 

11 William Washington, first child of Roger Washing- 
ton, Bishop of Durham, second of Sir William, Cheva- 
lier, first of Robert, first of William, first of William, 
second of Walter, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Was- 
syngton, county Durham, about 1370. He was son and 
heir. 

12 John Washington, first child of Robert, first of John, 
first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Milburne, county Westmoreland, about 1380. 

He was seized of the Manor of Hullhede, county West- 
moreland, II Henry VI. (1439). He had issue : 

13 Robert Washington, born at Hullhede, Westmore- 
land, about 1420. 

12 ROBERT WASHINGTON, first child of John, first of 
John, first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Warton, Lancaster, about 1400. 
Was living, temp. Henry V. and Henry VI. Died about 
16 Edward IV. (1479). ^^ had issue : 

13 John Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 

about 1430. 
13 Richard Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 

about 1435. 
13 Robert Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 
about 1440. 

12 Rev. William Washington, second of John Washing- 
ton, was born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1405. 
He was living at Diegge, county Lancaster, 11 Henry VI. 

(1438). He was clergyman at Diegge. 



44 . WASHINGTON. 

13 Robert Washington, first child of John, first of Rob- 
ert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane ; was born at Hullhede, county Westmoreland, 
about 1420. 

He was seized of the Manor of Hullhede, county West- 
moreland, where he resided, 40 Henry VI. (1468). He 
had issue : 

14 Thomas Washington, born at Hullhede, Westmore- 
land, about 1450. 
14 John Washington, born at Hullhede, Westmore- 
land, about 1455. 
14 Robert Washington, born at Hullhede, Westmore- 
land, about 1460. 

13 JOHN WASHINGTON, first son of Robert, first of John, 
first of John, first of John, second of Robert, second of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane ; was born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 

1430. 

He succeeded to the Warton estates, and died 4 May, 17 
Henry VII. (1501), and was succeeded by his eldest son 
Robert. He had issue : 

14 Robert Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster, 
in 1467. 

13 Richard Washington, second son of Robert, was born 

at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1435. 

He was an officer of the Yeomen of the Guard to Henry 
VII., circa 1490. 

13 Robert Washington, third son of Robert, was born 
at Warton, county Lancaster, about year 1440. 
Removed and settled at Tewhitfield, county Lancaster. 



WASHINGTON. 45 

He was the ancestor of the Washington family of North- 
amptonshire. 

By first wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Westfield, of 
Westfield, county Lancaster, he had issue : 

14 John Washington, born, at Tewhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1465. 
14 Thomas Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 
Lancaster, about 1467. 

13 Eleanor Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 
Lancaster, about 1470. 

By second wife, Jane, daughter of Miles Whittington, of 
Barwick, county Lancaster, he had issue : 

14 Robert Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 
Lancaster, about 1475. 

14 Miles Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1477. 
By third wife, Agnes, daughter of John Bateman, of 
Hersham, county Westmoreland, he had issue : 

14 William Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1480. 
14 Anthony Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1482. 
14 Walter Washington, born at Tewhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1485. 

14 Elizabeth Washington, born at Tewhitfield, 
county Lancaster, about 1490. 

"■ 14 Thomas Washington, first son of Robert, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of Jc-hn, 
first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; Avas born at Hiillhede, county Westmore- 
land, about T450. 

He died 10 Aug., 7 Henry VIII. (1515). Inquisition 
proved, 8 Henry VIII. (15 16). By wife Anne he had issue : 

15 Katharine, eldest daughter and co-heir, was aged 



46 WASHINGTON. 

lo years, 7 Henry VIII. (15 15). She married Miles 

Beck. Issue given in his line. 
15 Elizabeth, second daughter and co-heir, was aged 

8 years, 7 Henry VIII. (15 15). She married William 

Gilpin. Issue given in his line. 
15 Margaret, third daughter and co-heir, was aged 

3 years, 7 Henry VIII. (15 15). She married Thomas- 

Carus. Issue given in his line. • 
15 Johanna, fourth daughter and co-heir, was aged 2 

years, 7 Henry VIII. (15 15). She married Walter 

Chambre. Issue given in his line. 

14 John Washington, second son of Robert, was born at 
Hullhede, county Westmoreland, circa 1455. 
His father gave him lands in Rosegill, county Westmore- 
land. He resided at Kendall, county Westmoreland. He 
was defendant in a plea of trespass, 17 Henry VII. (1501). 
By wife Elizabeth, he had issue : 

15 Richard Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1490. 
15 Elizabeth Washington, born at Kendall, West- 
moreland, about 1492. 
15 Jane Washington, born at Kendall, Westmoreland,. 

about 1495. 
15 Thomas Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1497. 

14 Robert Washington, third son of Robert, was born 
at Hullhede, county Westmoreland, circa 1460. 
He settled at Stanley, county Westmoreland, obit circa 
8 Henry VIII. (1516). He had issue : 

15 Richard Washington, born at Stanley, Westmore- 
land, circa 1490. 
15 John Washington, born at Stanley, Westmoreland, 
circa 1495. 



WASHINGTON. 47 

14 ROBERT WASHINGTON, first child of John, first of 
Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, second 
of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf,, 
second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, county- 
Lancaster, in 1467. He was 34 years of age at the death 
of his father, 17 Henry VII. (1501). 

He was sergeant-at-arms to King Henry VII. and King 
Henry VIII. (circa 1500 to 15 10). He died 20 Sept., 9 
Henry VIII. (1517). He disinherited his eldest son and 
heir, Thomas, son of his first wife. 

By his first wife Robert Washington had issue : 

15 Thomas Washington, born at Warton, Lancaster,. 

in 1493. 

His second wife was Amy, sister to Sir Richard Whytell,, 

Knt. Her will dated 2 June, 1525, obit 20 June, 19 Henry 

VIII. (1527). Her husband gave to her and her issue all 

his inheritance. Issue by second wife : 

15 Richard Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, in 1506. 
15 Henry Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1508. 
15 Robkrt Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 15 10. 
15 Launcelot Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1512. 
15 Mary Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 15 15. Died infant. 
15 Mary Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 15 17. 
13 Anne Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1520. 

14 John Washington, first child of Robert, third of Robert,, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter^ 



48 WA SHING TON. 

fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Ter\vhitfield, 
county Lancaster, circa 1470. 

He married Margaret, daughter of Robert Kitson, of 
Warton, county Lancaster (sister of Sir Thomas Kitson, 
Alderman of London), by whom he had issue : 

15 Laurence Washington, born at Terwhitfield, 

county Lancaster, about 1500. 
15 Nicholas Washington, born at Terwhitfield, 

county Lancaster, about 1502. 
15 Leonard Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1505. 
15 Peter Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 1507. 
X5 Thomas Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county 

Lancaster, about 15 10. 
15 Jane Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county 
Lancaster, about 15 15. 

14 Thomas Washington, second child of Robert, was born 
at Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, circa 1467. Had issue 
two sons. 

14 Eleanor Washington, third child of Robert, was born 
at Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, circa 1470. 
She married James Mason, of Warton, county Lancaster. 

Issue given in his line. . 

14 Robert Washington, fourth child of Robert, was born 
at Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, circa 1475. Had is- 
sue : 

15 Thomas Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county 
Lancaster, about 1500. 

14 Miles Washington, fifth child of Robert, was born at 
Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, circa 1477. 



WA SUING TON. 49 

14 William Washington, sixth child of Robert, was born 
at Terwhitfield, Lancaster, about 1480. 

14 Anthony Washington, seventh child of Robert, was 
born at Terwhitfield, Lancaster, about 1482. 

14 Walter Washington, eighth child of Robert, was born 
at Terwhitfield, Lancaster, about 1485. 

14 Elizabeth Washington, ninth child of Robert, was 
born at Terwhitfield, Lancaster, about- 1490. 

15 Richard Washington, first of John, second of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at" Kendall, county- 
Westmoreland, about 1490. 

He was seized of the tythes of Rosegill, &c. He levied 
a fine on the Manor of Docker, county Westmoreland, 30 
Henry VHL (1538). 

He married Philippa, and had issue : 

16 Robert Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1525. 
16 Anne Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1528. 
16 Margaret Washington, born at Kendall, West- 
moreland, about 1530. 
16 John Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1532. 
16 Sophia Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1535. 
16 Thomas Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1538. 
16 Henry Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1504. 
4 



so IV A SUING TON. 

i6 Francis Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1545. 

15 Elizabeth Washington, second child of John Washing- 
ton, was born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 
1492. 

15 Jane Washington, third child of John Washington, 
was born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1495. 

15 Rev. Thomas Washington, fourth child of John Wash- 
ington, Rector of Germanstown, county Derby, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1497. 
He removed to Germanstown, county Derbv. where he 

was Rector. He died intestate. 

His wife, Joanna, had administration to her husband's 

goods, 23 Elizabeth (1580), was residing at Porloch, county 

Somerset, a widow, 26 Elizabeth (1583). 

15 Richard Washington, first son of Robert, third of 
Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first 
of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, 
first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Stan- 
ley, county Westmoreland, about 1490. Removed to 
*» Shappe, county Westmoreland. 

He was seized of the Rectory of Shappe and lands, &c., 
in Slegill, Shaftfield, Strickland, &c., county Westmore- 
land. Will dated 26 June, 1553, obit 2 Jan. 1554, 3 Philip 
and Mary. By wife, Anne Lund, he had issue : 

16 James Washington, born at Stanley, Westmore- 
land, about 1520. 
16 Ranulph Washington, born at Stanley, Westmore- 
land, about 1525. 

15 John Washington, second son of Robert, was born 



WA SUING TON. 51 

at Stanley, county Westmoreland, about 1495. He re- 
moved and settled at Delicar, county Westmoreland. 
He had issue : 

16 Thomas Washington, born at Delicar, Westmore- 
land, about 1520. 

15 THOMAS WASHINGTON, first child of Robert, first of 
John, first of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of 
John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Warton, county Lancaster, in 1493. 

He Avas son and heir. Was aged 24 years at his father's 
death, 9 Henry VHI. (1517). He was disinherited by his 
father, and filed his bill in chancery for the recovery of the 
estates, but did not succeed therein. He had issue : 

16 Laurence Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1515. 
16 Leonard Washington, born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1520. 

15 Sir Richard Washington, Knt., second child of Rob- 
ert, was born at Warton, county Lancaster, in year 1506. 
He was aged 21, 19 Henry VHL (1527). He was 

knighted, 29 Henry VHL (1537). 

15 Henry Washington, third child of Robert, was born 
at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1508. 

15 Robert Washington, fourth child of Robert, was born 
at Warton, county Lancaster, about 15 10. 

15 Launcelot Washington, fifth child of Robert, was 
born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1512. 

15 Mary Washington, sixth child of Robert, was born at 
Warton, county Lancaster, about 15 15. Died infant. 



52 WASHINGTON. 

15 Mary Washington, seventh child of Robert, was born 
at Warton, county Lancaster, about 15 17. 

15 Anne Washington, eighth child of Robert, was born at 
Warton, county Lancaster, about 1520. 

15 Hon. Laurence Washington, first child of John, first 
of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first of John, 
first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first 
of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, about 1500. 
He removed and settled at Grey's Inn, county Middle- 
sex, was Mayor of Northampton, 1532 and 1545. Had a 
grant of the Manor of Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, by 
purchase from the crown, 30 Henry VHI. (1538). He died, 
19 July, 26 Elizabeth (1584). 

He married, first, Elizabeth, widow of William Gough, of 
Northampton, who died 2 Oct., 1564. 

He married, second, Ann or Aimee, daughter of Robert 
Pargiter, of Glentworthi He had isstic : 

16 Robert Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middle- 
sex, in 1544. 
16 William Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middle- 
sex, about 1548. 
16 John Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middlesex, 

about 1550. 
16 Frances Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middle- 
sex, about 1555. 
16 Ann Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middlesex, 

about 1560. 
16 Mary Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middlesex, 

about 1565. 
16 Margaret Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Mid- 
dlesex, about 1567. 
16 Elizabeth Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Mid- 
dlesex, about 1570. 



WASHINGTON. 53 

16 Margaret Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Mid- 
dlesex, about 1573. 
16 Barbara Washington, born at Grey's Inn, Middle- 
sex, about 1576. 
16 Sir Laurence Washington, born at Grey's Inn, 
19 May, 1579. 
His numerous daughters formed alliances in the Mid- 
lands, and elsewhere, both patrician and plebeian. 

" When Henry VIII. made an end of the English Mon- 
asteries, 1538-9, he gave all the lands in Sulgrave and 
Woodford, and certain lands in Stotesbury and Cotton, 
near Northampton, lately belonging to the priory of St. 
Andrew's in that towri, and all lands in Sulgrave, lately 
belonging to the dissolved priories of Canons Ashby and 
Catesby, to Laurence Washington, of Northampton, gen- 
tleman. 

" Like many other persons who profited by the burly 
Tudor's coup, Laurence was a lawyer, being of Grey's 
Inn, London, and son of John Washington, of Whitfield, 
or Warton, Lancaster. He was also Mayor of Northamp- 
ton in 1532 and 1545. He died possessed of these lands, 19 
July, 26 Elizabeth (1584). His son and heir, Robert, jointly 
with his eldest son, Laurence, sold the property, 43 Eliz- 
abeth (1600), to his nephew, Laurence Makepeace, of the 
Inner Temple, London." 



THE OLD HOME OF THE WASHINGTONS, 

At Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, England, built by Hon. Laurence Washing-' 
ton. Mayor of Northampton. Visitation of 1846. 

" It was in a quiet, rural neighborhood, where the farm- 
houses were quaint and antiquated. A part only of the 
manor-house remained, and was inhabited by a farmer. 
The Washington crest, in colored glass, was to be seen in 
a window of what was now the buttery. Another relic of 



54 



WASHINGTON. 



the ancient manor of the Washingtons was a rookery in a 
■venerable grove hard by. The rooks, those staunch adher- 
ents to old family abodes, still hovered and cawed about 
their hereditary nests. In the pavement of the parish 
cliurch we were shown a stone slab bearing effigies on 
plates of brass, of Laurence Washington, gentleman, and 
Aimee, his wife, and their four sons and seven daughters. 
ThQ inscription in black letter was dated 1564. 

" The house stands at the eastern extremity of the village 
— indeed just outside of it ; in its own grounds, and is ap- 
proached on the west by a pretty green croft, separated 
from the almost encircling road by a hedge. Crossing by 
one of the paths one catches, through a gap on the right, a 
charming glimpse of Sulgrave church, gray with the rains, 
frost and sunshine of 300 years. A little to the left, not 
far from the building, are three fine elms, planted triangu- 
larly as regards one another, which at the time of my visit 
kept up a continual mournful rustling in the west wind, as 
if bewailing the loss of their six fellows cut down seven 
years ago ; and also of the inhabiting rooks, which then 
incontinently forsook their old abode. That was the end 
of Washington Irving's " grove " and " rookery," and as 
the farmer occupying the house tells me that one of the re- 
anaining trees is decayed, I suppose that before long not 
one of them will be left standing. They used to shear 
;sheep under them, which, with the rooks wheeling and 
•cawing above and the old house behind, must have made a 
pretty picture. 

" From this side one first sees a dead gable-end, with two 
narrow, $topped-up windows, and a partly stone, partly 
tiled roof ; of which former material the whole mansion 
is composed, though curiously defaced by plaster. This, 
having dropped off here and there, gives the edifice an 
■equally dilapidated and venerable appearance. The ivy, 
which profusely mantles the northern side of the house, 
has climbed up the left side of the gable-end and ridge of 




THE OLD HOME OF THE WA8HINGTON8 AT SULGEAVE, ENGLAND- 










■1 1 II' »iw 



WASHINGTON COAT-OF-ARMS. 



SULaRAVE CHURCH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 



WASHINGTON. 55 

the roof, and seems to intend an ascent up the two rather 
•ornamental chimneys surmounting the gable. To the left 
is the high wall of a kitchen garden, with a fragrant elder 
. tree peeping over its coping, and standing in a shallow ditch 
or trench, boasting a luxuriant growth of nettles. A tall- 
ish yovmg fir at the further end of the garden wall, near a 
gate affording access to the road, finishes the prospect in 
this direction. 

" To the right of the gable-end is a low stone wall with a 
larch gate, fencing a small court, partly paved, partly in 
grass. This court was occupied by a brood of young 
•ducks, resting together in very white and loving proxim- 
ity, and only now and then giving themselves the trouble 
to quack. In respect to behavior they were much wiser 
than a fussy hen with her family of scared-looking chick- 
ens, which comported themselves after the fashion of their 
kind, as if the whole solar system had no other purpose 
than their molestation. From this court-yard one enters 
the house by a handsomish old stone doorway. Above, 
two little attic windows project from the tiled roof. To 
the right of the court-yard are various modern buildings, 
prooer to a farm-house, sheds, out-houses, and odoriferous 
pig-sties. All the foregoing is visible at one coup d' ceil irom. 
the close behind the rustling elms. 

" The southern aspect of the old mansion is accurately de- 
lineated, which may spare me some description. Only 
one-third of the original edifice is here remaining. Once 
it extended eastwards over the garden — some 30 or 40 feet 
— to a declivity, where there was more recently a wall six 
feet high. The joining of the gable-end is plainly per- 
ceptible on the wall. The projection at right angles with 
the main building was formerly the porch, but the fine old 
Tudor doorway of brown-stone, with its square-headed 
mouldings and depressed arch, has been converted into 
a dairy window by bricking up the lower portion. In the 
spandrels (or , triangular spaces to the riglit and left of 



56 WASHINGTON. 

the arch) are two shields containing the Washington coat-^ 
of-arms, as shown in my sketch. Three centuries have 
somewhat worn off their original sharpness, but they are 
still clear-cut and unmistakable. 

" What a fortune had that shield of a private Englisb 
gentleman — to become the most notable blazon of all the 
world ! Strange to think that this little obscure stone coat- 
of-arms in a secluded Northamptonshire village should be- 
the original of so much — should still be extant ! As 
strange to think of the contrast between the torpid and, 
monotonous rustic life surrounding it for so many gener- 
ations with the rush and roar of existence in our great 
republic ! 

" There can be no question that the three stars and three 
stripes furnished the idea for the American flag, albeit the 
details of the transaction are involved in obscurity. Tra- 
dition attributes the suggestion to that great inventor, Ben- 
jamin Franklin (whose ancestors, by the way, also came 
from Northamptonshire). Tupper is probably right in his 
Centennial drama when he makes Franklin say : 

" 1 proposed it to the Congress. 



It was their leader's old crusading blazon, 
Washington's coat, his own heraldic shield. 
And on the spur, when we must choose a flag 
Symboling independent unit)', 
We and not he — all was unknown to him — 
Took up his coat-of-arms and multiplied 
And magnified it every way to this, 
Our glorious national banner. 

" He adds, also, some allusions to the identical old man- 
sion which I am now describing : 

" The Washingtons, of Wessyngton, 

In County Durham, and of Sulgrave manor, 
County Northampton, bore upon their shield 
Three stars atop, three stripes below the fess, 
Gules — that is red — on white, and for the crest 



WASniNGTOlSr. 57 

An eagle's head upspringing to the light. 
The architraves at Stilgrave testify. 
As sundry painted windows in the hall 
At Wessyngton, this was their family coat. 
And at Mount Vernon I myself have noted 
An old cast-iron, scutcheoned chimney-back 
Charged with that heraldry. 

" Mr. Tupper tells us that he himself made the Mount 
Vernon discovery, in 185 1, and 'long after verified the 
matter at Herald's College ;' and the crest and coat-of- 
arms appear upon the cover of his unpublished but pri- 
vately printed drama. The motto is : Exitus acta probat 
(Issue proveth acts). Baker, who gives his authority for 
the genealogy as ' from visitations and title-deeds : the 
American line from monumental inscriptions,' states the 
Washington arms as follows : 

''Argent, two \>2iX% gules, in chief three mullets of the second. Crest, a 
raven with wings endorsed proper, issuing out of a ducal coronet or. 

" And these are yet to be seen in Fawsley and Brington 
churches, Northamptonshire, differenced by a crescent. 
Dugdale also quotes these as the arms of Washington in 
the windows of Radway and of Leekington churches, 
Warwickshire ; and thus Mr. Evelyn Philip Shirley gives 
them in ' Stemmata Shirleiana.' In so large and scatter- 
ing a family as the Washingtons, it is easy to imagine 
how some variations might occur in the crest or coat-of- 
arms — especially when we remember the queer, conven- 
tional drawing of the old heralds. A mullet is the rowel 
of a spur (used as the filial distinction of a third son), 
hence the difference between itanda star would not be per- 
ceptible. And the crest on Mr. Tupper's book is more like 
a raven's head than an eagle's — certainly a less appropriate 
national emblem than the king of birds. It is asserted 
that Franklin objected to the latter symbol, and indeed to 



$8, WA SHING TON. 

all heraldic beasts and birds, conventionally used as types 
of sovereignty, saying they were invariably creatures 
of prey and therefore unworthy of representing modern 
civilization. In lieu of an eagle, he characteristically pro- 
posed a turkey, as a valuable domestic fowl, particularly 
suitable to an exclusively agricultural country, as America 
then was. But the utilitarianism of the project had too comic 
an aspect for adoption, and old-fashioned ideas prevailed. 

" Let us return to the ancient manor house at Sulgrave. 
Over the blocked-up doorway, and midway between it and 
the window above, is what appears to have been another 
coat-of-arms, also in stone, but so plastered that only the 
shape of the shield is discernible. It is more than twice 
the size of those in the spandrels. And above the common 
upper, window there is yet another coat-of-arms, similarly 
disfigured. It is circular and surmounted by a sheaf or 
coronet with feathers, having also mutilated ' supporters,' 
probably a griffin and a lion. Each of these animals holds 
a flag. If these be indeed the Washington supporters the 
latter fact is a curious coincidence. Like the motto, it 
might be regarded as prophetic. 

"The lower window in the main building to the right of 
the porch is that alluded to by Irving as having once con- 
tained the Washington arms in stained glass. It is men- 
tioned also by Baker as 'the arms and alliances of the 
family ornamenting the kitchen window.' The fate of this 
memorial was peculiar. Colonel Henry Hely-Hutchinson, 
the late lord of the manor, an old Waterloo soldier, had 
the panes removed for their better preservation, when they 
were either stolen from or accidentally broken in his desk. 
So the very means taken for insuring their safety precipi- 
tated their destruction or disappearance. ' What,' asked 
a writer in the Quarterly Review of 1857, alluding to the 
circumstance in an article on ' The History and Anti- 
quities of Northamptonshire,' 'would the Americans, who, 
having at first expunged " Heraldry " from their cyclo- 



WASHINGTON. 59 

paedias, are now the chief clients of the Heralds' College, 
give to recover those purloined or broken quarries ?' 

" There is nothing remarkable in the appearance of the 
eastern and northern sides of the house, which are almost 
entirely covered with ivy, even to the obscuring of the 
windows. The south-east gable has three common, muti- 
lated chimneys, but some others, further on, seem ancient. 

" During the time of their ancestors' ownership of the 
Sulgrave lands, they unquestionably lived there, and in all 
probability the Laurence who first acquired them built the 
old manor house. Let me relate what is known, in addi- 
tion, of the English Washingtons. They seem to have 
been a good old family, numerous, and, as an American 
would say, pretty scattering, for one reads of them as in 
Lancashire, Yorkshire, Leicestershire, Durham, Warwick- 
shire, Wiltshire, and Sussex, as well as Northamptonshire. 
They were country gentlemen, soldiers, lawyers, scholars, 
and the like. One — a Thomas Washington, of Compton, 
Sussex — fought as a captain in Flanders in the reign of 
Elizabeth. Another, brother to the Robert who sold the 
Sulgrave manor, appears to have attained knighthood, for 
he figures as Sir Laurence Washington, of Garsdon, Wilt- 
shire, and was buried there on the 21st of May, 1643, aged 
sixty-four. Laurence, the second, who abetted his father in 
the sale, was born at Brington, where his grandfather and 
nr.mesake, the mayor and lawyer, seems to have settled. 
This branch of the family subsequently became allied to tlie 
important one of the Spencers, but hardly prospered until 
Sir William Washington, of Packington, Leicestershire 
(according to Baker — Washington Irving says Kent), got 
married to Anne, half sister to George Villiers, Duke of 
Buckingham, the imperious favorite of Charles the First. 
Perhaps William was knighted after and in consequence of 
this connection ; anyway it benefited the family. The 
younger Washingtons are said to have been courtiers be- 
fore, in the reign of James the First. 



6o WA SUING TON. 

"Colonel Henry Washington distinguished himself in 
1646, when elevated to the command of Worcester, the 
governor having been captured by the enemy. It was a 
time of confusion and dismay. The King had fled from 
Oxford in disguise, and gone to the Parliamentary camp 
at Newark. The royal cause was desperate. In this crisis 
Sir Henry received a letter from Fairfax, who, with his 
victorious army, was at Haddington, demanding the sur- 
render of Worcester. The following was Colonel Wash- 
ington's reply : 

" Sir : — It is acknowledged by your books, and by report of your own 
quarter, that the King is in some of your armies. That granted, it may be 
easy for you to procure His Majesty's commands for the disposal of this 
garrison. Till then I shall make good the trust reposed in me. As for 
conditions, if I shall be necessitated, I shall make the best I can. The 
worst I know and fear not ; if I had, the profession of a soldier had not 
been begun nor so long continued by your Excellency's humble servant, 

Henry Washington. 

" In a few days Colonel Whalley invested the city with 
5,000 troops. Sir Henry despatched messenger after mes- 
senger to the King to know his pleasure. None of them 
returned. A female emissary was equally unavailing. 
Week after week elapsed until nearly three months ex- 
pired. Provisions began to fail, the city was in confusion, 
the troops grew insubordinate, yet Sir Henry persisted in 
the defence. General Fairfax, with 1,500 horses and foot, 
was daily expected. Still Sir Henry 'awaited His Maj- 
esty's commands.' At length news arrived that the King 
had issued an order for the surrender of all towns, castles, 
and ports. A printed copy of the order was shown to Sir 
Henry, and on the faith of that document he capitulated 
(19th July, 1646) on honorable terms, won by his fortitude 
and preseverance. Those who believe in hereditary vir- 
tues may see foreshadowed in the conduct of this Wash- 
ington of Worcester, the magnanimous constancy of pur- 
pose, the disposition to ' hope against hope,' which bore 



JVA SUING TON. 6 1 

•our Washington triumphantly through the darkest days of 
our Revolution." He was son of Sir William Washington, 
■of Packyngton (page 87). 

15 Nicholas Washington, second child of John, was born 
at Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, about 1502. 
He was of Warton, county Lancaster, 37 Henry VHL 

<i545)- 

15 Leonard Washington, third child of John, was born at 
Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, about 1505. 

15 Peter Washington, fourth child of John, was born at 
Terwhitfield, county Lancaster, about 1507. 

15 Thomas Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county Lan- 
caster, about 15 10. 

15 Jane Washington, born at Terwhitfield, county Lan- 
caster, about 15 15. 

15 Thomas Washington, first of Robert, fourth of Robert, 
third of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, 
second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first 
of Walter, first of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Par- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Terwhit- 
field, county Lancaster, about 1500. 

He removed and settled at Compton, county Sussex ; was 
a captain in Flanders. 

He had issue by wife, who was daughter of a Deering, viz. : 
16 Richard Washing-Ton, born at Compton, about 

1525. Died s. p. 
16 Lucy Washington, born at Compton, about 1527. 
Married Mr. Thezelwright, of Cambridge. Had is- 
sue. 
16 Ann Washington, .born at Compton, about 1530. 

Married Robert Bateman. Had issue. 
16 Katharine Washington, born at Compton, about 
1532. Married Melchior Reynolds. Had issue. 



62 WASHINGTON. 

l6 Robert Washington, first child of Richard, first of 
John, second of Robert, first of John, first of Robert,, 
first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert^ 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Kendall, county .Westmoreland, about 1525. 
He lived at Docker, county Westmoreland, also at Ken- 
dall. He was seized of the tythes of Rosegill and Waste- 
land. Will dated 14 Nov., 1583. Inquisition post morten^ 
20 April, 27, Elizabeth (1584). He had issue : 

17 Randall Washington, born at Docker, counter 

Westmoreland, in 1568. 
17 Richard Washington, born at Docker, county- 
Westmoreland, about 1570. 
17 James Washington, born at Docker, county West- 
moreland, about 1572. 

16 Ann Washington, second child of Richard, was bom 
■ at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1527. 

16 Margaret Washington, third child of Richard, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1530. 

16 John Washington, fourth child of Richard, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1532. 
Obit 1598. He had issue : 

17 Francis Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1555. 
17 John Washington, born at Kendall, Westmore- 
land, about 1560. 

16 Sophia Washington, fifth child of Richard, was born* 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland; about 1535. 

16 Thomas Washington, sixth child of Richard, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmorelanfl, about 1538. 



WASHINGTON. 63 

He died 1587. He married Ellen (obit 1599). He had 
issue : 

17 Alan Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1565. 
17 Thomas Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, about 1568. 
17 James Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1570. 

16 Henry Washington, seventh child of Richard, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1540. 
He removed and lived at Sedburgh, county Westmore- 
land. By wife, Elizabeth, he had issue : 

17 Simon Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1580. 
17 John Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1583. 
17 Thomas vVashington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, about 1585. 
17 Margaret Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, about 1587. 
17 Agnes Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1590. 

16 Francis Washington, eighth child of Richard, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1545. 
He removed to Gravigg, county Westmoreland. 

16 James Washington, first child of Richard, first of Rob- 
ert, third of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first 
of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first 
of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Stanley, county Westmoreland, about 1520. 
To whom his father gave half the rectory and tythes of 

Shappe, county Westmoreland, in fee tail. He purchased 



64 WA SHING TON. 

the manors of Ardwick le Street, Hampall and Armsthorp. 
county York, temp. Elizabeth. He Avas plaintiff in a plea, 
conjointly with his brother Ranulnli, touching lands in 
Blasterfield, county Westmoreland, and Penrith, county 
Cumberland, 6 and 8 Elizabeth (1564-6). Will dated, 15 
August, and he died 29 August. Inquest, p. 19 Octo- 
ber, 22 Elizabeth (1580). He was buried at Ardwick le 
Street. 

He married Margaret, daughter of John Anlaby, of 
Etton, county York. She lived at Ardwick le Street, and 
died there, 1579, aged 35, and was buried at Ardwick. He 
had issue : 

17 Martin Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, 17 Aug., 1565. 
17 Richard Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, 25 Nov., 1566. 
17 Philip Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1568. 
17 Francis Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1570. 
17 Bartholomew Washington, born at Ardwick le 

Street, county York, about 1572. ^ 
17 Lucy Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1574. 
17 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1576. 
17 Catharine Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1578. 
17 Jane Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 1580. 

16 Ranulph Washington, second of Richard, was born at 
Stanley, county Westmoreland, about 1525. 
He removed and lived at Bibleker, county Westmore- 

Dand. He was living i James I. (1603). 

He was plaintiff, conjointly with his brother James, in a 



WASHINGTON. 65 

plea touching- lands in Blasterfield, county Westmoreland, 
and Penrith, county Cumberland, 6 and 8 Elizabeth 
{1564-6). By wife Eleanor, he had issue : 

17 Ranulph Washington, born at Billeker, county 
Westmoreland, about 1560. 

16 Thomas Washington, first child of John, second of 
Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Delicar, county Westmoreland, about 1520. 
He had issue. 

16 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, first child of Thomas, first 
of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first 
of John, first of John, second of Robert, second of Rob- 
ert, first of Robert, first of Walter, first of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 15 15. 
He was living 35 Henry VHI. (1543). He had issue : 
17 Laurence Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1540. 
17 Leonard Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1545. 
17 Robert Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1550. 

16 Leonard Washington, second child of Thomas, was 
born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1520. 
He was living 37 Henry VHI. (1545). He had issue: 
17 Robert Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1550. 

16 Robert Washington, first child of Hon. Laurence, 
first of John, first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, 
5 



66 WASHINGTON. 

first of John, first of John, second of Robert, second of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 
Dane ; was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, in 

1544- 

He removed and lived at Sulgrave, Northamptonshire. 
He was aged 40 at his father's death, 26 Elizabeth (1584). 
He died at Althorp, 10 Mar., 1623. 

He had license to alienate or sell his lands, 36 Elizabeth 
(1593), and sold the Manor of Sulgrave to his nephew, 
Laurence Makepeace, 43 Elizabeth (1600), of the Inner 
Temple, London. 

He married Elizabeth, daughter of Walter Light, of Red- 
way, county Warwick, his first wife, by whom he had issue : 
17 Laurence Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 

Northampton, about 1565. 
17 Robert Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 

Northampton, about 1567. 
17 Walter Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 

Northampton, about 1570, died infant. 
17 Walter Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 
Northampton, about 1575. 
Married second, Ann. daughter of Mr. Fisher, of Hans- 
lape, county Bucks. She died 1602. Had issue : 

17 Robert Washington, born at Sulgrave, Northam- 

tonshire, about 1595. 
17 Margaret Washington, born at Sulgrave, North- 
amptonshire, about 1597. 
17 Albany Washington, born at Sulgrave, Northamp- 
tonshire, in 1599. 
17 Guy Washington, born at Sulgrave, Northamp- 
tonshire, in 1602. 
"The Washingtons were a gentle family, although 
greatly reduced in circumstances, having been compelled 
to part with the estate of Sulgrave, upon which they retired 
to Brington. The Lord Spencer of that day befriended 



WASHINGTON. 6>j 

them, and as they had frequently been his guests at Worm- 
leighton, on their settlement at Brington they were wel- 
comed at Althorp." 

l6 William Washington, second child of Hon. Laurence, 
was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1546. 
Had issue three sons. 

16 John Washington, third child of Hon. Laurence, was 
born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1548. Had 
issue four sons. 

16 Frances Washington, fourth child of Hon. Laurence, 
was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1550. 
Married John Thompson, of Sulgrave. 

16 Ann Washington, fifth child of Hon. Laurence, was 
born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1552. Mar- 
ried Edmund Fisher, of Hanslape. 

16 Mary Washington, sixth child of Hon. Laurence, was 
born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1555. Mar- 
ried Abel Makepeace, of Chipping Warden. Had son : 
17 Laurence, to whom his uncle Robert sold the 
Manor of Sulgrave, 43 Elizabeth (1600). He was of 
the Inner Temple, London. 

16 Margaret Washington, seventh child of Hon. Lau- 
rence, was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 
1557, died infant. 

16 Elizabeth Washington, eighth child of Hon. Lau- 
rence, was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 
1560. 

16 Margaret Washington, ninth child of Hon. Laurence, 
was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1563. 
Married Gerard Hawtyer. 



68 iVA SHING TON. 

l6 Barbara Washington, tenth child of Hon. Laurence, 
was born at Grey's Inn, county Middlesex, about 1576. 

16 Sir Laurence Washington, Knt., eleventh child of 
Hon. Laurence, was born at Grey's Inn, county Middle- 
sex, 19 May, 1579. 

He was of Garsdon, Wiltshire, was Register in Chan- 
cery, 46 Elizabeth (1603). Obit 1643, aged 64 years. 

Married Anne, who died 1645, aged 75 years. He had 
issue : 

17 Laurence Washington, Jr., botn at Garsdon,, 

Wiltshire, about 1605. 
17 Martha Washington, born at Garsdon, Wiltshire^ 

about 1607. 
17 Mary Washington, born at Garsdon, Wiltshire,, 
about 16 1 o. 



SIR LAURENCE WASHINGTON, OF GARSDON. 

" Garsdon, a parish in England, in the county of Wilt- 
shire, has the honor of containing in its venerable church 
a monument erected to the memory of Sir Laurence Wash- 
ington. The village of Garsdon is about two miles from 
Malmesbury, and the church is a quaint Gothic structure,, 
situated in the bosom of a rich country and surrounded 
with ancient trees. 

"The monument was once a superb specimen of rich and 
curious workmanship. It is to be seen in the chancel on 
the left side of the altar, and is finely carved out of the 
stone of that part of the country. It is surrounded with 
the family Coat-of-Arms, which forms a handsome Emblaz- 
onment of Heraldry, and although erected more than two 
hundred years ago, they are still burnished with gildings 
and the following interesting inscription appears : 



p^ 



WASHINGTON. 6^ 



To ye 
Memory of 

6ir Caurcncc lllasljington, Wit, 

Lately Chief Register 
Of ye Chancer)-e, 



s ;;• Of Renown, Piety and Charitye. 

^ ^ An Exemplyarye, and Loving Husband, a Tender 

•^ 51 Father, a Bountefulle Master, a Constante 

T' '' Reliever of ye Poore : and to Thoas of His Parish 

8 8" A Perpetual Benefactor. 

Si t5 Whom it Pleased 



^ 



<■> 



God to Take into His Peace 
8 I From ye Furye of j-e Inzuing Warrs. 



s 



^ S. Born May XIX. 

^' S»> He was Heare Interred 



"S 



>3. 





T) 




u 




!-• 




cfl 


1 


a. 


^ 






e 




.u 


u 


♦-f 


w 








<n 


^ 


■*-» 


a> 


C 
u 


e 


k4 
C4 


— 


PU 


.s 


in 


to. 




J5 


c 


71 


o 


ffi 


C/3 






Ic 


in 




3 


J= 


O 




H 


o 



;:^ 8 May XXIV, An. Dni. 1643 

8 ^, 64, 

„ 8 Heare also Lyete 

8 J* ■' 

V. Dame Anne 

is Wife, who Deceased 

Januar)' Xllth, and who 

Was Beryed XlVth, 

Anno Dni. 1645. 

" The ancient English homestead of the Washington 
family, at Garsdon, is handsome, very old-fashioned, and 
built of stone, with immense solidity and strength. The 
timber about it is chiefly oak, and in several of the rooms, 
particularly the old hall or banqueting room, there are 
rich remains of gilding, carved work in cornices, ceilings 
and panels, polished floors and wainscoting, also shields 
containing the same Coat-of-Arms as in the mural Monu- 
ment in the church, carved over the lofty antique mantel- 
pieces. Beneath the house are extensive cellars, which,, 
with the banqueting room, seem to indicate the genuine 
hospitality and princely style of living peculiar to a " fine 
old English gentleman, all of the olden time," and, indeed^ 
according to the traditions and chronicles of that region of 
country, such was the general character of the heads of the 



V 



WASHINGTON. 



Washington family. The walls of the house are five feet 
thick, and the entire residence is surrounded by beautiful 
gardens and orchards." 

17 Laurence Washington, first child of Sir Laurence, of 
Garsdon, eleventh of Hon. Laurence, of Grey's Inn, first 
of John, first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, 
first of John, first of John, second of Robert, second of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane ; was born at Garsdon, Wiltshire, about 
1605. 

He was Register in Chancery, 2 Charles L (1626). Died 
in 1662. 

Married Elizabeth, daughter of William Guise, of El- 
more, county Gloucester. Issue : 

18 Elizabeih Washington, daughter and heiress, 
and only child, born at Garsdon, about 1630, died 
1693. 
She married Sir Robert Shirley, Knt., first Earl of Fer- 
rers, at Garsdon, about 1650. He died 17 17. Had ten sons 
and seven daughters, of whom only five survived infancy, 
viz.: 

1 Robert, who predeceased his father, died 1699, leav- 
ing one son and a daughter, viz.: 

Robert, Viscount Tamworth, who also died vitd 

patris, 1 7 14, unmarried. 
Elizabeth, who married James, fifth Earl of 

Northumberland, and succeeded, as heiress of 

her brother, to the Baronies of Chartley, 

Bouchier and Lovaine. 

2 Washington, who succeeded his father, in 1717, as 
second Earl of Ferrers, but died s. p., when the hon- 
ors devolved upon his brother. 

3 Henry, third Earl, at whose decease, unmarried, the 
title passed to his nephew. 



WA SITING TON. 7 1 

4 Laurence, who married Anne, fourth child of Sir 
Walter Clarges, Bart., and had six sons and four 
daughters, of whom the three eldest sons : 

1 Laurence, born anno 1720, fourth Earl of Fer- 
rers, died s. p. 

2 Washington, fifth Earl of Ferrers, died s. p. 

3 Robert, sixth Earl of Ferrers, had issue : 

1 Robert, seventh Earl of Ferrers, and 

2 Washington, present Earl. 

Robert married, second wife, Anne, daughter of Sir 
Humphrey Ferrers, Knt., of Tamworth Castle, and heir of 
her grandfather, John de Ferrers. 

On the 14th Jan. 166 1-2, Laurence Washington, of Gars- 
don, county Wiltshire, made his will, in which he left an 
annuity of ^a^o per annum to his cousin John, son of Sir 
John Washington, of Thrapston, county Northampton, 
Knt. 

His widow, Elizabeth, married Sir William Pargetar, 
Xnt. 

17 Martha Washington, second child of Sir Laurence, 
was born at Garsdon, Wiltshire, about 1607. 
Married Sir John Tyrrell, Knt., of Springfield, county 

Essex. 

17 Mary Washington, third child of Sir Laurence, was 
born at Garsdon, Wiltshire, about 1610. 
Married a Horspole, of Maidstone, county Kent. 

17 Randall Washington, first son of Robert, first of Rich- 
ard, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, first of 
Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of 
Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
-second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the 



72 WASHINGTON. 

Dane ; was born at Docker, county Westmoreland, ini 
1568. 

He was aged 16 years and 6 months, at his father's death,. 
1584. He was living and was recusant, in 1640. First, 
wife, Mabilla, obit 1623. Issue : 

18 John Washington, born at Docker, county West- 
moreland, about 1595. 
18 Stephen Washington, born at Docker, county 

Westmoreland, about 1600. 
18 Mary Washington, born at Docker, county West- 
moreland, in 161 1. 
Second wife, Maria, obit 1640. 

17 Richard Washington, second son of Robert, was- 
born at Docker, county Westmoreland, about 1570. 
His father bequeathed to him and his brother James, the 

tithes of Rosegill, &c., for their lifetime. 

17 James Washington, third son of Robert, was born at 
Docker, county Westmoreland, about 1572. 
His father bequeathed to him and his brother Richard^ 

the tithes of Rosegill, &c., for their lifetime. 

17 Francis Washington, first child of John, fourth of 
Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first of John^ 
first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John,, 
first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Kendall, county Westmore- 
land, about 1555. 
By wife Agnes, he had issue : 

18 John Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1580. 
18 Richard Washington, born at Kendall, county 
Westmoreland, about 1585. 



WASHINGTON. 73 

18 Margaret Washington, born at Kendall, county 
Westmoreland, about 1590. Married Henry Newby. 

17 John Washington, second child of John, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1560. 
He died the*-e in 1685. By wife Margaret, he had issue : 
18 Thomas Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, about 1583. 
18 Agnes Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, about 1585. 

17 Alan Washington, first child of Thomas, sixth of 
Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Kendall, county Westmore- 
land, about 1565. 

17 Thomas Washington, second child of Thomas, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1568. 
He settled at Grarigg, county Westmoreland. Died 
1619. He had issue by his wife Ann (who was living in 
1619), viz. : 

18 Randall Washington, born at Grarigg, county 

Westmoreland, about 1595. 
18 Richard Washington, born at Grarigg, county 

Westmoreland, about 1597. 
18 Margaret Washington, born at Grarigg, county 

Westmoreland, about 1600. 
18 Agnes Washington, born at Grarigg, county West- 
moreland, about 1605. 

17 James Washington, third child of Thomas, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1570. 
He settled at Grarigg, county Westmoreland. He died, 

1619. By wife Anne, he had issue : 



74 WASHINGTON. 

i8 Henry Washington, born at Grarigg, county West- 
moreland, about 1600. 

17 Simon Washington, first child of Henry, seventh of 
Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Kendall, county Westmore- 
land, about 1580. 
He settled at Sedburgh, Yorkshire. Married at Kendall, 

1618, Anna Atkinson. Had issue : 

18 Henry Washington, born at Sedburgh, Yorkshire, 
about 1620. 

17 John Washington, second child of Henry, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1582. 

17 Thomas Washington, third child of Henry, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1585. 

17 Margaret Washington, fourth child of Henry, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1587. 

17 Agnes Washington, fifth child of Henry, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1590. 

17 Martin Washington, first child of James, first of Rich- 
ard, first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first 
of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first 
of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Ardwick le Street, county 
York, 17 Aug., 1565. 
" He was son and heir, aged 15 years and 12 days at his 

father's death, 29 Aug., 22 Elizabeth (1580)." He died 3 

Aug., 23 Elizabeth (1581). 



WASHINGTON. 75 

17 Richard Washington, second child of James, was born 
at Ardvvick le Street, York, 25 Nov., 1566. 
Heir to his brother Martin, at the time of whose death he 
was aged 14 years, 8 montlis and 8 days. To whom his 
father gave the Manor of Hampall, county York. He suf- 
fered a recovery of his land, 30 Elizabeth (1588). Had 
license to alienate the Manor of Armethorpe, 40 Elizabeth 
(1598). He purchased the site of the priory of Hampall, 
41 Elizabeth (1599). He was treasurer to the lame soldiers, 
22 James I. (1624), and died 20 April, 10 Charles I. (1634). 
He married Marie, daughter of Thomas Wombwell, of 
Wombwell, county York. Had issue : 

18 D'Arcy Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, in 1594. 
18 Philip Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1596. 
18 Gregory Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1598. 
i8 William Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1600. 
18 Thomas Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1602. 
18 Richard Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1605. 
18 Francis Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1607. 
18 Elizabeth Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1610. 
18 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 161 2. 

17 Philip Washington, third child of James, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1568. 
His father gave him an annuity for life, of ^d 13s. 4d. 

17 Francis Washington, fourth child of James, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1570. 



76 WA SH2NG TON. 

His father gave him an annuity for life, of ;^6 13s. 4d. 

17 Rev. Bartholomew Washington, fifth child of James, 
was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 

1572. 

His father gave him an annuity for life, of £,(> 13s. 4d. 
He was executor to his father's will. He was Rector of 
Burgh Walys, now Wallis, county York. He died 1622. 

His wife, Isabella, was executrix to his will, in 1622. He 
had issue : 

18 Marmaduke Washington, born at Ardwick le 

Street, county York, about 1595. 
18 Gregory Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1597. 
18 Bartholomew Washington, born at Ardwick le 

Street, county York, about 1600. 
18 Anne Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1602. 
18 Margaret Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 1605. 

17 Lucy Washington, sixth child of James, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1575. 

17 Mary Washington, seventh child of James, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1577. 

17 Catharine Washington, eighth child of James, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1580. 

17 Jane Washington, ninth child of James, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1582. 

17 Ranulph Washington, first child of Ranulph, second 
of Richard, firit of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, 
first'of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, 



WASHINGTON. 77 

first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of 
Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Tor- 
fin the Dane ; was born at Billeker, county Westmore- 
land, about 1560. 

He settled. at Threapland, county Westmoreland. Sold 
his lands, 27 James I. (1629). He had issue : 

18 Richard Washington, born at Threapland, county 
Westmoreland, about 1600. 

17 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, first son of Laurence, first 
of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of 
Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1540. 
He was living 30 Elizabeth (1588). He had issue : 

18 Laurence Washington, born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, A. D. 1569. 

17 Leonard Washington, second child of Laurence, was 
born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1545. 
He married Elizabeth Crofts. She died in year 1588. 
He had issue : 

18 John Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1580. 

17 Robert Washington, third child of Laurence, was born 
at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1550. 
He was living in 1588. He had issue : 

18 Robert Washington, born at Warton, county Lan- 
caster, about 1580. 

17 Robert Washington, first son of Leonard, second of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 



78 WASHINGTON. 

ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1550. 

Will dated 1588, bequeathed his lands to his. son, and the 
heirs begotten of his body. Default to Robert, the son of 
Robert, who was the son of Laurence Washington. He 
had only son : 

18 Leonard Washington, born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1575. 

17 Laurence Washington, first child of Robert, first of 
Hon. Laurence, first of John, first of Robert, tiiird of 
Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, second 
of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Sulgrave, 
county Northampton, about 1565. 

He died at Brington, Northampton, 13 Dec, 1616. He 
married, 3 Aug., 1588, Margaret, daughter of William But- 
ler, of Tighes, county Sussex. His children were : 

18 Sir William Washington, baptized at Sulgrave,. 

county Northampton, about 1589. 
18 Sir John Washington, baptized at Sulgrave, North- 
amptonshire, about 1591. 
18 Robert Washington, baptized at Sulgrave, North- 
amptonshire, about 1593. 
18 Lucy Washington, baptized at Brington, North- 
amptonshire, about 1595. 
18 Laurence Washington, baptized at Sulgrave^ 

Northamptonshire, about 1597. 
18 Richard Washington, baptized at Sulgrave, North- 
amptonshire, about 1600. 
18 /VMY Washington, baptized at Sulgrave, North- 
ampton, about 1602. 



WASHINGTON. 79 

18 Thomas Washington, baptized at Sulgrave, North- 
amptonshire, about 1605. 
18 Gregory Washington, baptized at Brington, North- 
amptonshire, 16 Jan., 1607. Died, and was buried,, 
17 Jan., 1607. 
18 George Washington, baptized at Wormleighton,, 

county Warwick, 3 Aug., 1608. 
18 Joan Washington, baptized at Brington, North- 
amptonshire, about 1610. 
18 Elizabeth Washington, baptized at Brington,, 

Northamptonshire, about 1612. 
18 Barbara Washington, baptized at Brighton, Sus- 
sex, about 1 6 15. 
At his death he held a Manor of Lord Spencer, named 
Wicke, in Northamptonshire. 

" There is a monument erected to the memory of Lau- 
rence Washington, in the chancel of the Brington churcli, 
in Northamptonshire, a slab displaying the family arms 
with those of his wife ; and an inscription in Latin and 
English. From the first we learn that he had eight sons 
and nine daughters." 

17 Robf.r r Washington, second child of Robert, was born 
at Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1567. 
He settled at Brighton, county Sussex, and died 1612. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Cheshall, of 
Moore Hall, Essex. 

" Married Elizabeth, who survived her husband. She left, 
by her will, dated 17 Mar., 1722-3, among other legacies, 
to her nephews and nieces, ;^ioo to her nephew. Sir Wil- 
liam Washington." 

17 Walter Washington, third child of Robert, was born 
at Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1570. Died in- 
fant. 

17 Walter Washington, fourth child of Robert, was born 
at Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1575. 



8o WASHINGTON. 

He settled at Redway, county Warwick. He married 
Katliarine Murdon, of Radcliff, county Warwick. 

17 Robert Washington, fifth child of Robert, was born at 
Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1595. 

17 Margaret Washington, sixth child of Robert, was 

born at Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1597. 
. She married John Gardiner, of London. Children given 
in his line. 

17 Albany Washington, seventh child of Robert, was born 
at Sulgrave, couniy Northampton, in year 1599. 
"He was aged 19 years in 1618." 

17 Guy Washington, eighth child of Robert, was born at 
Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1602. 

18 John Washington, first child of Randall, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first 
of John, second of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Docker, 
county Westmoreland, about 1595. 

He was recusani in 1640. His wife, Jane, was also re- 
cusant in 1640. He had issue : 

19 William Washington, born at Docker, county 
Westmoreland, about 1620. Obit 1624. 

18 Stephen Washington, second child of Randall, was 
born at Docker, county Westmoreland, acout 1600. 
He settled at Kendall, county Westmoreland. He pur- 
chased lands in Sedburgh and Hewgill, 2 Charles I. (1626). 
He had issue : 

19 Richard Washington, of Kendall, who was living 
20 Charles n.( 1668). 



WASHINGTON. 8i 

l8 Mary Washington, fifth child of Randall, was born at 
Docker, county Westmoreland, about 1611. 

18 John Washington, first child of Francis, first of John, 
fourth of Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first 
of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first 
of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Kendall, county- 
Westmoreland, about 1580. 

18 Richard Washington, second child of Francis, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1585. 

18 Margaret Washington, third child of Francis, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1590. 
Married Henry Newby. 

18 Thomas Washington, first child of John, second of 
John, fourth of Richard, first of John, second of Robert, 
first of John, second of Robert, .first of John, first of 
Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first 
of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Ken- 
dall, county Westmoreland, about 1583. He died 161 7. 
He married, in 1606, Elizabeth Moore. She died 1616. 
He had issue : 

19 Margaret Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, in 1607. 
19 Thomas Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, in 1609. 
19 John Washington, born at Kendall, county West- 
moreland, in 1612. 
19 Isabella Washington, born at Kendall, county 

Westmoreland, in 1616. 
19 Elizabeth Washington, born at Kendall, county 
6 



82 WASHINGTON. 

Westmoreland, about 1620. Married, 1641, to Rich- 
ard Jordan. 

18 Agnes Washington, second child of John, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1585. 

18 Randall Washington, first child of Thomas, second of 
Thomas, sixth of Richard, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of 
Peter^ first of John, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth 
of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of 
Torfin the Dane ; was born at Grarigg, county West- 
moreland, about 1595. 
He was recusant, 3 Charles I. (1627), and died in 1627. 

18 Richard Washington, second child of Thomas, was 
born at Grarigg, county Westmoreland, about 1597. 

18 Margaret Washington, third child of Thomas, was 
born at Grarigg, county Westmoreland, about 1601. 

18 Agnes Washington, fourth child of Thomas, was born 
at Grarigg, county Westmoreland, about 1605. 



18 Henry Washington, first child of James, third of 
Thomas, sixth of Richard, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, first of 
Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first 
of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Grarigg, 
county Westmoreland, about 1600. 
He settled at Kink ley, Lonesdale. By wife Anne Binks, 

of Sudburgh, he had issue : 

19 Simon Washington, born at Kinkley, Lonesdale, 
in 1629. 



WASHINGTON. 83 

19 Matilda Washington, born at Kinkley, Lones- 

dale, in 1634. 
19 Dorothy Washington, born at Kinkley, Lones- 

dale, about 1636. 

18 Henry Washington, first child of Simon, first of Henry, 
seventh of Richard, first of John, second of Robert, first 
of John, second of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Sedburgh, 
county York, about 1620. 
He was of Kinkley, in Lonesdale, in 20 Charles W. (1680). 

By wife Dorothy, he had issue : 

19 Simon Washington, of Kinkley, in Lonesdale, He 
was living in 1700. 

18 D'Arcy Washington, first child of Richard, second of 
James, first of Richard, first of Robert, third of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane • was born at Ardwick le 
Street, county York, in 1594. 

" He was 40 years of age at his father's death, 10 Charles 
I. (1634)." He was seized of tlie Manor of Hamphall. He 
sold lands at Ardwick le Street, 31 Charles II. (1691). 

He married, 9 James I. (161 1), Anne, daughter of Mathew 
Wentworth, of Bretton. He had issue : 

19 James Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about. 1612. 
19 D'Arcy Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1615. 
19 Mathew Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 1617. 



84 WASHINGTON. 

19 Anne Washington, was born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1620. 
19 Grace Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1622. 
19 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1625. 
19 Sarah Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1630. 
19 Elizabeth Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1632. 
19 Robert Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1635. 

18 Philip Washington, second child of Richard, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1596. 
He was of the university of Oxford, and died, 1635. 

18 Gregory Washington, third child of Richard, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1598. 

18 William Washington, fourth child of Richard, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1600. 

18 Thomas Washington, fifth child of Richard, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1602. 

18 Richard Washington, sixth child of Richard, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1605. 
He was of the University College of Oxford, and Pro- 
vost of Trinity College, of Dublin, in 1640. 

18 Frances Washington, seventh child of Richard, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1607. 
She married Roger Kelvert, of London, merchant. 

Children given in his line. 



WASHINGTON. • 85 

18 Elizabeth Washinoton, eighth child of Richard, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1610. 

18 Mary Washington, ninth child of Richard, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 161 2. 

18 Marmaduke Washington, first child of Rev. Bartholo- 
mew, fifth of James, first of Richard, first of Robert, 
third of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1595. 

18 Gregory Washington, second child of Rev. Bartholo- 
mew, was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 
1597- 

18 Bartholomew Washington, third child of Rev. Bar- 
tholomew, was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, 
about 1600. 
He was of Lincolnshire. 

18 Anne Washington, fourth child of Rev. Bartholomew, 
was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1602. 

18 Margaret Washington, fifth child of Rev. Bartholo- 
mew, was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 
1605. 

18 Richard Washington, first child of Ranulph, first of 
Ranulph, second of Richard, first of Robert, third of 
Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first 
of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, 
first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 



86 . WASHINGTON. 

of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Threapland, county Westmoreland, about 1600. 
Son and heir, joined his father in the sale of his estates, 
22 James I. (1624). 

18 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, first son of Laurence, first 
of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first 
of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of John, 
first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, 
:second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin 
the Dane ; was born at Warton, county Lancaster, in 
year 1569. 

He was of Warton, i James (1603), i and 4 Charles I. 
(1625-1629). He had three sons, viz. : 

19 Leonard Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1595. 
19 Laurence Washington, born at Warton, county 

Lancaster, about 1597. 
19 Thomas Washington, born at Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1600. 

18 John Washington, first son of Leonard, second of Lau- 
rence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first 
of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, sec- 
ond of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, 
•county Lancaster, about 1580. He had issue : 

19 Alicia Washington, baptized at Warton, county 

Lancaster, A. D. 1616. 
19 James Washington, baptized at Warton, county 
Lancaster, A. D. 1619. 

18 Robert Washington, first child of Robert, third of 
Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, 



WA SHING TON. 87 

first of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, 
second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first 
of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at War- 
ton, county Lancaster, about 1580. 
He was living in 1588. 

38 Leonard Washington, only child of Robert, first of 
Leonard, second of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, 
second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, 
first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Warton, county Lancaster, about 1575. 
He was of Yeland, in Warton, county Lancaster. He 

bad issue : 

19 John Washington, born at Yeland, Warton, county 
Lancaster, about 1597. 

18 Sir William Washington, Knight, of Pakyngton, 
county Leicester, first child of Laurence, first of Robert, 
first of Hon. Laurence, first of John, first of Robert, 
third of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, 
second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, 
first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first 
of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Sul- 
grave, county Northumberland, about 1589. Obit 1643. 
He was buried at St. Martin in the Field, at London, 22 
June, 1643. 

He married Agnes or Anne, half sister of Geo. Villars, 
Duke of Buckingham. She was buried at Chelsea, 25 
May, 1643. Hs had issue : 

19 Henry Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 

Northumberland, in 1615. 
19 George Washington, born at Sulgrave, county 
Northumberland, about 161 7. 



88 WA SUING TON. 

19 Christopher Washington, born at Sulgrave, county- 
Northumberland, about 1620. 
19 Elizabeth Washington, born at Sulgrave, countjr 

Northumberland, about 1622. 
19 Susanna Washington, born at Sulgrave, county- 
Northumberland, about 1625. 
19 Catharine Washington, born at Sulgrave, county- 
Northumberland, about 1627. 
"Sir William Washington owned the Manor of Lack- 
hampstead, county Bucks, at time of death." 

His aunt Elizabeth, widow of his uncle Robert, by her 
will, dated 17 Mar., 1723, bequeathed ;j^ioo to her nephew,. 
Sir William Washington. 

He was knighted at Theobalds, 17 Jan., 1622. After the- 
marriage of his half sister, the Duke of Buckingham 
appears to have taken the whole family under his protec- 
tion, and advanced their fortunes in various ways until the 
time of his death. 

Sir William Washington was of Packington, county 
Lancaster, in 1618. 

In his will, 6 June, 1643, he gives his residence as at 
Thistleworth (Isleworth), county Middlesex, and directs 
his Manor of Wicke, and Wicke farm, shall be sold. This 
Manor was in the parish of Isleworth, and had been pur- 
chased, in 1638, by Sir William Washington, from the co- 
heirs of Sir Michael Stanhope, but he was compelled tO' 
mortgage it, in 1640, to Sir Edward Spencer and Sir Rich- 
ard Wynne, and it was in possession of the latter at his 
death, in 164.9. 

18 Sir John Washington, Knight, of Thrapston, county 
Northampton, second child of Laurence, was born at Sul- 
grave, Northamptonshire, about 1591. Obit 1663. He 
married, by license, at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, 14 June, 
1621, Mary, daughter of Philip Curtis. She died i Jan., 



WASHINGTON. 89 

1625. Her mother's will, dated 6 Dec, 1622, bequeathed 

;^5o to her daughter's son Mordaunt as a legacy. Issue : 
19 Mordaunt Washington, born at Thrapston, county- 
Northampton, in 1622. 
19 John Washington, born at Thrapston, county- 
Northampton, about 1624. 
19 Philip Washington, born at Thrapston, county- 
Northampton, about 1626. 

He married second wife, widow Dorothy- Kirkbey. No 
child by- second wife. 

He was knighted at Newmarket, 21 Feb., 1623. 

Mary, wife of Sir John Washington, died, Jan. i, 1625, 
and was buried in the church of Islip, Northampton- 
shire, where her monument still exist, bears the following 
inscription : " Here lieth y^ body of Dame Mary, wife unto 
Sir John Washington, Knight, daughter of Phillipe Curtis, 
gent, who had issue by hur sayd husbande, three sonns, Mor- 
daunt, John, and Phillipe. Deceased the i Janii. 1624-5." 

Among the Royalist Composition Papers at the Public 
Revenue office, in the case of the Earl of Northampton, 
there is an affidavit of a tenant who had paid ^218 to 
Thomas Farrer, for the use of the said Earl and Sir John 
Washington. Farrer responds that what sums of money 
he had received out of the estate of James, Earl of North- 
ampton, had been so received, " as Agent, and on behalf of 
Sir John Washington, by virtue of an extent, which the said 
Sir John had on said estate in the county of Bedford," 
whereupon it was ordered on the 23 Feb., 1653-4, "that a 
letter be written to Sir John Washington, to pay in the 
money or show cause." 

Sir John Washington died before Oct. 6, 1678, on which 
day his widow Dorothy made her will, and described her- 
self as " Relict of Sir John Washington, Knight, deceased." 
She directed to be buried in the chancel of the churcli of 
Fordham, in Cambridgeshire, near her grandchild Mrs. 
Penelope Audley. She had no issue by second husband. 



90 WASHINGTON. 

18 Robert Washington, third child of Laurence, ivas fe.*rT.. 
at Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, about 1593. 

18 Lucy Washington, fourth child of Laurence, was born 
at Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, about 1595. 

18 Rev. Laurence Washington, fifth child of Laurence, 
was born at Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, about 1597. He 
was a student at Oxford, in 1622. Parson of the church at , 
Purlingham, county Essex, in 1633. He was of Brasenose 
College, and matriculated, 2 Nov., 1621. Record, " Lau- 
rent Washington, Northamp. Gen. fil. an nat. 19," — /. e., 
Laurence Washington, of Northamptonshire, whose 
father's rank was that of a gentleman, and whose own 
age was 19 at his last birthday. 

The will of his aunt Elizabeth, widow of his uncle 
Robert, dated 17 Mar., 1623, leaves him her husband's seal 
ring, and states that he was then of Oxford. 

He took his B. A. degree in 1623, and became Fellow of 
Brasenose, in 1624. He served as lector, the principal edu- 
cational office in the college, from 1627 to 1632 inclusive. 

26 Aug., 163 1, he became one of the proctors of the Uni- 
versity ; 14 Mar., 1632-3, he was presented to the then very 
valuable living of Purleigh, in Essex, and resigned his 
fellowship. He continued at Purleigh until 1643, when he 
was " ejected by sequestration for his loyalty in the late 
rebellion of 1642." 

He continued in his profession of clergyman after the 
Restoration. 

18 Richard Washington, sixth child of Laurence, was 
born at Sulgrave, Northamptonsnire, about 1600. 
He was apprenticed, 7 July, 1614, under the auspices of 

the Clothworker's Company, to Richard Brent, of London. 

18 Amy Washington, seventh child of Laurence, was born 
at Sulgrave, county Northampton, about 1602. 



WASHINGTON. ' 91 

She married at Brington, Philip Curtis, of Brington, 
Northampton, 3 Aug., 1620. Daughter : 

19 Katharine Curtis, born at Sulgrave, county North- 
ampton, about 1622. 

The will of Philip Curtis was nuncupative, and made 19 
May, 1636, in presence of Sir John Washington, Knight, 
and another. He bequeathed ^1,000 to his daughter Kath- 
arine, when of age or married, and to his nephews John 
and Philip Washington, each ;^S°> when of age. His 
nephew Mordaunt, he commended to the kindness of his 
wife, to whom he bequeathed the residue of his estate, 
and appointed as guardians of his daughter, the clergyman 
of the parish, and " Sir John Washington, of Thrapston, 
in the county of Northampton, Knight." The will was 
proved on 30 May, 1636, by his relict Amy Curtis, and on 
the ensuing 30 June, she made her own will. After direct- 
ing to be buried in the Chancel of Islip, near her husband, 
she proceeds substantially as follows : 

" Whereas, there was given to my nephew Mordaunt 
Washington, the eldest son of Sir John Washington, 
Knight, by the last will and testament of his grandmother 
Curtis, deceased, the sum of ;^5o. I now give to said Mor- 
daunt ^250 more, to be emplo3'ed for his benefit till he 
becomes of age or married. 

" Whereas, my husband, lately deceased, gave to John 
Washington, second son of Sir John Washington, Knight 
;^5o. I now give to said John, my nephew, ^50 more, to 
be employed to his use till he be of age, &c. 

" Whereas, my husband, lately deceased, gave by his last 
will, to my nephew Philip Washington, third son of Sir 
John Washington, Knight, ;^5o. I now give him ■ ^50 
more, &c. 

" Whereas, my husband, Philip Curtis, by his last will, 
gave me and my heirs forever, all his lands, houses, &c. I 
now give the same to my only daughter, Katharine Curtis, 
and her heirs forever, as well as the residue of all my es- 



92 WASHINGTON. 

tate, and appoint ' my dear and loving mother, Margaret 
Washington, and my loving brother. Sir John Washington, 
Knight,' to be her guardians." 

One of the witnesses was her brother, William Washing- 
ton. Administration granted to Sir John Washington, 
Knight, 19 Nov., 1636. 

18 Thomas Washington, eighth child of Laurence, was 
born at Sulgrave, county Northumberland, A. D. 1605. 
He died in Spain. He was attached to the Suite of 
Prince Charles, on the occasion of his memorable matri- 
monial expedition to Spain. He died at Madrid, in 1623, 
aged 18 {Howell's Letters). 

18 Gregory Washington, ninth child of Laurence, was 
baptized at Brington, Northamptonshire, 16 Jan., 1607. 
Died 17 Jan., 1607. 

18 George Washington, tenth child of Laurence, was 
baptized at Wormleighton, Warwickshire, 3 Aug., 1608. 
He went as a soldier to Bergen ap Zoon, in 163 1. 

18 Joan Washington, eleventh child of Laurence, was 
born at Brington, Northamptonshire, about 1610. 
She married Francis Pill, of Midford. 

18 Elizabeth Washington, twelfth child of Laurence, 
was born at Brington, county Northampton, about 1612. 
She married Francis Mauce, or Mewce, or Mews, of 

Holdenby. 

18 Barbara Washington, thirteenth child of Laurence, 
was born at Brington, county Northampton, about 
1615. 
She married Simon Butler, of Appleton, or Appletree, 



WASHINGTON. 93 

Northamptonshire. She thus became the ancestress of 
Alban Butler, author of the " Lives of the Saints." 

19 Richard Washington, first child of Stephen, second of 
Randall, first of Robert, first of Richard, first of John, 
second of Robert, first of John, second of Robert, first of 
John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Ak- 
aris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, about 1625. 
He was living, 20 Charles II. (1668). 

19 Margaket Washington, first child of Thomas, first of 
John, second of John, fourth of Richard, first of John, 
second of Robert, first of John, second of Robert, first of 
John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, f<nirth of Bondo, second of Ak- 
aris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, in 1607. 

39 Thomas Washington, second child of Thomas, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, in 1609. 

J9 John Washington, third child of Thomas, was born at 
Kendall, county Westmoreland, in 161 2. » 

39 Isabella Washington, fourth child of Thomas, was 
born at Kendall, county Westmoreland, in 1616. 

19 Elizabeth Washington, fifth child of Thomas, was born 
at Kendall, county Westmoreland, in 16 18. Married, 
1641, Richard Jordan. 

19 Simon Washington, first child of Henry, first of James, 
third of Thomas, sixth of Richard, first of John, second 
of Robert, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, 



94 WASHINGTON. 

first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris,. 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Kinkley, Lonsdale, Eng., in 1629. 

He was of Cockermuth, county Cumberland. He was 
living, 20 Charles W. (1668). 

19 Matilda Washington, second child of Henry, was 
born at Kinkley, Lonsdale, Eng., in 1634. Died, 1636. 

19 Dorothy Washington, third child of Henry, was born: 
at Kinkley, Lonsdale, Eng., 1636. Died 1643. 

19 Simon Washington, first child of Henry, first of Simon,, 
first of Henry, seventh of Richard, first of John, second 
of Robert, first of John, second of Robert, first of John, 
first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris,. 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at 
Kinkley, Lonsdale, Eng., about 1645. 
He was living in 1700. 

19 James Washington, first child of D'Arcy, first of Rich- 
ard, second of James, first of Richard, first of Robert, 
third of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Johr^, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 161 2. 
He was Lieutenant Colonel in the ermy of King Charles 
L, and slain at the siege of Pontifract. He married Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of William Copley, of Sportborough, 
county York. He had issue : 

20 Richard Washington, born at Ardwick le Street^ 

county York, in year 1639. 
20 Foljambe Washington, born at Ardwick le Street,, 
county York, about 1641. 



WASHINGTON. 95 

20 Godfrey Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1643. 
20 Dorothy Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1645. 
20 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street,, 

county York, about 1646. 
20 Francis Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1648. 
His widow married second husband, Stephen Eyre. 

19 D'Arcy Washi>jgton, second child of D'Arcy, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1615. 

19 Mathew Washington, third child of D'Arcy, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 16 17. 

19 Anne Washington, fourth child of D'Arcy, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1620. 
Married George Gill, of Notton, county Derby. 

19 Grace Washington, fifth child of D'Arcy, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1622. 
Married Thomas Stanhope, of Hamphall, county . 

19 Mary Washington, sixth child of D'Arcy, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1625. 
Married John Robinson, of Pickburne. 

19 Sarah Washington, seventh child of D'Arcy, was bom 
at Ardwick Ic Street, county York, about 1630. 
^Married Godfrey, son of Godfrey Copley, of Shelbrook,. 

county York. 

19 Elizabeth Washington, eighth child of D'Arcy, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1632. 



96 WASHINGTON. 

19 Robert Washington, ninth child of D'Arcy, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1635. He settled 
at Leeds, county York. He had issue : 

20 Joseph Washington, born at Leeds, county York, 
about 1660. 

19 LEONARD WASHINGTON, first child of Laurence, first 
of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of 
Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of 
John, first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf^ second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1595. 
He was recusant 1640. Obit 1657. He married Anne. 
She was recusant 1640. He had issue : 

20 Robert Washington, baptized at Warton, county 

Lancaster, A. D. 16 16. 
20 Jane Washington, baptized at Warton, county 

Lancaster, A. D. 1619. 
20 Francis Washington, baptized at Warton, county 

Lancaster, A. D. 1622. 
20 LAtTRENCE Washington, baptized at Warton, coiintv 

Lancaster, A. D. 1625. 
-20 John Washington, baptized at Warton, county 
Lancaster, A. D. 1627 (Laurence and John emigrated 
to America, A. D. 1659). 

19 Laurence Washington, second child of Laurence, was 
born at Warton, county Lancaster, about 1597. He was 
recusant 1640. He had issue : 

20 Eleanor Washington, baptized at Warton, county 

Lancaster, 1638. 
20 I^eonard Washington, baptized at Warton, counly 
Lancaster, 1645. 

19 THO.M.A.S Washing JON, third child of Laurence, was born 
at Warton, coanty Lancaster, about 1600. Obit 1658. 



WASHINGTON. 97 

19 Alicia Washington, first child of John, first of Leon- 
ard, second of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of John, 
first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first 
of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
baptized at Warton, county Lancaster, in 1616. 

19 James Washington, second child of John, was bap- 
tized at Warton, county Lancaster, in 1619/ 

19 John Washington, first child of Leonard, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Leonard, second of Thomas, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Jcjhn, 
first o^ John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first 
of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of 
Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Yeland, in Warton, county Lancaster, about 
1597. He had issue : 

20 Christopher Washington, baptized at Yeland, in 
Warton, county Lancaster, in 16 19. 

19 Henry Washington, first child of Sir William Wash- 
ington, Knight, of Pakyngton, county Leicester, first of 
Laurence, first of Robert, first of Hon. Laurence, first of 
John, first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first 
of John, first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of B(^ndo. second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane : 
was born at Sulgrave, county Northampton, in 1615. 
" He was aged 3 years, in 1618. He levied a fine on the 
Manor of North Cave, county York, in 1694." He had is- 
sue : 

20 Richard Washington, born at North Cave, county 
York, about 1640 
7 



98 WASHINGTON. 

19 George Washington, second child of Sir William 
Washington, Knight, was born at North Cave, county- 
York, about 1617. 

19 Christopher Washington, third child of Sir William 
Washington, Knight, was born at North Cave, county 
York, about 1620. 

19 Elizabeth Washington, fourth child of Sir William 
Washington, Knight, was born at North Cave, county 
York, about. 1622. 
Married George Legg, Lord Dartmouth. 

19 Susan Washington, fifth child of Sir William Wash- 
ington, Knight, was born at North Cave, county York, 
about 1625. 
Married Reginald Graham. 

19 Catharine Washington, sixth child of Sir William 
Washington, Knight, was born at North Cave, county 
York, about 1627. 

19 MoRDAUNT Washington, first child of Sir John Wash- 
ington, Knight, of Thrapston, county Northampton, 
seventh of Laurence, first of Robert, first of Hon. 
Laurence, first of John, first of Robert, third of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Thrapston, county 
Northampton, A. D. 1622. 
He settled at Althorpe, in 1640. 

19 John Washington, second child of Sir John Washing- 
ton, Knight, of Thrapston, was born at Thrapston, county 
Northampton, about 1624, 
Was living, 1640. 



WA SHING TON. 99 

19 Philip Washington, third child of Sir John Washing- 
ton, Knight, of Thrapston, was born at Thrapston, county 
Northampton, about 1626. 

Was living, 1640. 

20 Richard Washington, first child of James, first of 
D'Arcy, first of Richard, second of James, first of Richard, 
first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first of Rob- 
ert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Rob- 
ert, first of RojDert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, in year 1639. 
He was captain of the trained band at the age of 38. In 

1666 he levied a fine on the Manor of Ardwick. He died 
in 1678, aged 39. 

He married Elizabeth ap Rees, of Washingly, county 
Huntingdon. Had issue : 

21 Richard Washington, baptized at Ardwick le 

Street, county York, in 1673. 
21 James Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1675. 
21 Robert Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1677. 
21 Elizabeth Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1680. 
21 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 1682. 

20 FoLjAMBE Washington, second child of James, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1641. 
Died s. p., in 1678. 
He was buried at Barnesley, county York, 1678. 

20 Godfrey Washington, third child of James, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1643. Died 
unmarried, in 1709. 



loo WASHINGTON. 

20 Dorothy Washington, fourth child of James, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1645. 
She married Henry Dore, of Tolmyth, county York. 

20 Mary Washington, fifth child of James, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1646. 
Married Robert Eyre, of Holmsfield, county York. 

20 Rev. Francis Washington, sixth child of James, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York^about 1648. 
He was Rector of Sprotsborough, county York. He 
married, in 1669, Elizabeth Bower, of Sprotsborough, county 
York. Had issue : 

21 George Washington, born at Sprotsborough, 

county York, about 1670. 
21 Elizabeth Washington, born at Sprotsborough, 

county York, about 1672. 
21 Anne Washington, born at Sprotsborough, county 

York, about 1675. 
21 Frances Washington, born at Sprotsborough, 

county York, about 1677. 
21 Grace Washington, born at Sprotsborough, 
county York, about 1680. Died infant. 

20 Joseph Washington, first child of Robert, ninth of 
D'Arcy, first of Richard, second of James, first of Rich- 
ard, first of Robert, third of Robert, first of John, first 
of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, first of John, 

\ first of Robert, first of Robert, first of. Walter, fourth 
of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of 
Torfin the Dane ; was born at Leeds, county York, about 
1660. 
He was of the Inner Temple, London, a favorite of Sir 

John Somers, the Lord Keeper. He was buried in the 

Temple Church, London, i Mar., 1693. 



WASHINGTON. lor 

20 Robert Washington, first child of Leonard, first of 
Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was baptized at Warton, county 
Lancaster, in 1616. Obit 1623. 

20 Jane Washington, second child of Leonard, baptized 
at Warton, county Lancaster, in 1619. 

I 

20 Francis Washington, third child of Leonard, baptized 
at Warton, county Lancaster, in 1622. 

20 Laurence Washington, fourth child of Leonard, was 
baptized at Warton, county Lancaster, in 1625. 
Emigrated to America in 1659. He settled in Viroinia. 
The two breathers, Laurence and John, purchased land 
for their plantations, in Westmoreland couutv, between the 
Potomac and Rappahannock rivers, and located at or near 
Bridge's Creek. He died on his estate, in Rappahannock 
county, early in Jan., 1677. His will, dated 27 Sept., 1675. 
Proved, 6 Jan., 1677. His wife, Jane, his second wife, 
daughter of Captain Fleming, was appointed executrix of 
his will. He had issue, named : 

21 Mary Washington, born at Warton, England, 

about 1648. 
21 John Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1660. 
21 Ann Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1662. 
He first settled with his brother John near the Potomac, 
and afterward removed into Rappahannock county, where 
he died. In Tappahannock, the county seat of Essex, in 
the records of the old county of Rappahannock, is recorded 



I02 WASHINGTON, 

the will of Laurence Washington, and in the Court House 
of Westmoreland i3 recorded the will of his brother John. 
Both of the wills were made in the same year, that of Lau- 
rence, 27 Sept., 1675, and of John, 26 Feb., 1675. The lat- 
ter, proved 10 Jan., 1677, the former, 6 Jan., same year, — an 
interval of only four days, — so that it is probable that they 
died about the same time, or within a few days of each 
other. 

THE WILL OF LAURENCE WASHINGTON. 

'' In the name of God, Amen. 

"I, Laurence Washington, of the colmty of Rappac, 
being sick and weak in body, but of sound and perfect 
memory, do make and ordain this, my last will and testa- 
ment, hereby revokitig, annulling, and making void all 
former wills and Codicclls, heretofore by me made, either 
by word or writing, and this only to be taken lor my last 
will and testament. Imprs. I give and bequeath my Soide 
into the hands of Almighty God, hoping and trusting 
through the mercy of Jesus Christ, my one Savior and re- 
deemer, to receive full pardon and forgiveness of all my 
sinns, and my body to the earth, to be buried in comely 
and decent manner, by my Executrix hereafter named, and 
for my worldly goods I thus dispose them. Item, I give and 
bequeath unto my loving daughter, Mary Washington, my 
whole estate in England, both reall and personally to her 
and the heirs of her body, lawfully begotten, forever, to be 
delivered into her possession immediately after my decease, 
by my Executrix hereafter named. I give and bequeath 
unto my aforesaid daughter, Mary Washington, my small- 
est stone ring and one silver cup, now in my possession, 
to her and her heirs, forever, to be delivered to her imme- 
' diately after my decease. I give and bequeath unto my 
loving son, John Washington, all my bookes, to him and 
his heirs, forever, to be delivered to him when he shall 
come to the age of Tv^Q.nX.y-ovi& y cares. I give and bequeath 



WASHINGTON. T03 

unto my son, John, and daughter, Arm Washington, all 
the rest of my plate, but what is before exprest to be 
■equally divided between them, and delivered into their 
possession when they come of age. Item, my will is, 
that all my debts which of right and justice I owe to any 
man be justly and truly paid, as allso my funerall e::penses, 
after which my will is, that all my whole estate, both 7-eaIl 
and personally be equally divided between my loving wife, 
Jane Washington, and the two children God hath given 
me by her Vizt John and Ann Washington. I give and 
■bequeath it all to them, and the heires of their bodies, law- 
fully begotten, forever, my sonn's part to be delivered to 
him when he come." of age, and my daughter's part when 
she comes of age or day of marriage, which shall first 
happen. Item, my will is, that that land which became 
•due to me in right of my wife, lying on the South Side of 
the river, formerly belonging to Capt. Alexander Flemm- 
ing, and commonly known by the. name of West Falco, be 
sold by my Executrix hereafter named, for the payment oi 
my debts, immediately after my decease. Item, my will 
is, that the land I have formerly entred with Capt. Wm. 
Mosely, be forthwith after my decease, surveyed and pa*- 
Jented hy my Execx hereafter named, and if it shall amount 
to the quantity of one thousand acres, then I ^iVe and be- 
queath unto Alexander Barrow, two hundred acres of the 
sd land, to him and his heires, forever, the remainder I give 
and bequeath unto my loving wife aforesd and two chil- 
dren, to them and their heires, forever, to be equally divided 
between them. Item, my will is, that if it shall please 
God to take my daughter Mary out of the world before 
she comes of age, or have heirs lawfully begotten of her 
body, then I give and bequeath my land in England, which 
by my will I have given to her, unto my son, John Wash- 
ington and his heirs, and the pers&iiall estate which I have 
given to her, I give and bequeath the same unto my daugh- 
ter, Ann Washington and her heires, forever. Item, I do 



I04 WASHINGTON. 

hereby make and ordain my loving wife, Jane Washing- 
ton, Executrix of this rny last will and testament, to see it 
performed, and I do hereby make and appoint my dear and 
loveing Brother Coll John Washington, and my loving friend 
Thomas Hawkins (in case of the death or neglect of my 
executrix), to be the overseers and guardians of my Chil- 
dren untill they come of age to the truth whereof I have 
hereunto Sett my hand and Scale, this 27th of September, 

1675- 

"LAURENCE WASHINGTON. \Seale\ 

" Signed Sealed and declared to be 
his last will and testament, in the 
presence of us. 

" Cornelius Wood. 
" Signed. 

" John B. Barrow, 
" Henry Sandy, Junr. 

"A codicil of the last will and testament of Laurence 
Washington, annexed to his will, and made Septembr 27th, 

1675- 

" Item, my will is, that my part of the land I now live 
upon, which became due to me by marriage of my wife, 
I leave it 2uholy and solely to her disposable after my de- 
cease, as witness my hand, the day and year above written. 
LAURENCE WASHINGTON. [Scale.'] 

" Signed, Sealed and declared to be 
a Codicil of my last will and tasta- 
ment, in t\\Q presence of us. 

" Cornelius Wood, 

" Henry Sandy, Junr- 

" The above named Henry Sandy, Junr., aged 70 yeares, 
or thereabts, sworn and examined, saith, that he did see the 
above named Laurence Washington, Sign, Scale and pub- 



WASHINGTON. 105 

lish the above mentioned, to be his last will and testament, 
and that he was in perfect scnce and memory at the Sign- 
ing, Sealing and publishing thereof, to the best of your 
deponent's Judgment. 

"HENRY SANDY. 

"Juratus est Henricus Sandy, in Cur Com Rappkac. 
Sexto die. Jany, Ano 1677. Jr Saca end pr and probat. 

" Sc St 

" EDMD CRASK, Cl Cy. 

" A Copy Teste 

" James Ray Micon, Clerk, 

" Essex County Court, 

" State of Virginia." 

20 COL. JOHN WASHINGTON, fifth child of Leonard, was 

baptized at Warton, county Lancaster, Eng., in 1627. 

Emigrated to America in 1659, and settled in Virginia, 
on Bridge's Creek, near the confluence of the Potomac. 

" John Washington, ancestor of the first President of the 
United States, arrived in America in 1659, a passenger in a 
ship owned by Edward Prescott, of which one John Greene 
was captain. During the voyage, Elizabeth Richardson, 
who may have been only an enthusiastic Quakeress, was 
suspected of witchcraft, and hung by the crew. J(;hn 
"Washington, incensed by the transaction, upon landing 
preferred charges against the owner of the vessel, and Ken- 
dall, governor of Maryland, took bonds for his appearance 
to answer at the next Provincial Court, held at St. INIarv's. 

"On Sept. 30, 1659, Washington, who lived in Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, on the opposite side of the Potomac 
river, wrote to Fendall : 

" Hon'ble Sir. Yo'rs of this 29th instant, this day I 
received. I am sorry y* my extraordinary occasions will 



io6 WASHINGTON. 

not permit mee to bee att y^ next Provincial Court, to be 
held in Maryland y® fourth of this next month. Because 
then, God willing, I intend to gett my young Sonne bap- 
tized. All y^ Company and Gossips being already invited. 
Besides in this short time witnesses cannot be gott to come 
over. But if Mr. Prescott bee bound to answer att y^ 
next Provincial Court after this, I shall doe what lyeth in 
my power to gett them over. 

"Sr I shall desire you for to acquaynt mee whether Mr. 
Prescott be bound over to y® next court, and when y« court 
is, that I may have some time for to provide evidence, and 
soe I rest. 

"Your ffr^end and servant, 

"30 September, 1659. JOHN WASHINGTON." 

He died early in January, 1677, within a few days of his 
brother Laurence. " He was interred in a vault which had 
been erected at Bridge's Creek." His will, dated 26 Feb., 
1675, at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia, 
was proved 10 Jan., 1677, and recorded in the Court House 
of Westmoreland. He was colonel of the Virginian 
forces, co-operating with those of Maryland, against the 
Seneca Indians, who were ravaging the settlements along 
the Potomac. 

John Washington was church- warden of old " White 
Chapel," Lancaster county, Virginia, ift 1661. The two 
brothers, Laurence and John, purchased lands for their 
plantations in Westmoreland county, between the Potomac 
and Rappahannock rivers. They located at Bridge's 
Creek. 

John Washington was married first in England, and 
brought his wife and two children with him in 1659. They 
all died soon after arrival, and in his will he requests to be 
buried " on his plantation by the side of his wife and two 
children." 

He was married near Pope's Creek, in Westmoreland 



WA SHING TON. 107 

county, about 1660, to his second wife Anne Pope, whose 
father resided at Pope's Creek. Had i^sue : 

21 Laurence Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1661. 
21 John Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1663. 
21 Elizabeth Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1665. 
21 Anne Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1667. 
Colonel John Washington became an extensive planter, 
Magistrate, and member of the House of Burgesses. In 
honor of his public services and private virtues, the parish 
in which he resided was called after him, and still bears the 
name of Washington. He lies buried in a vault on Bridge's 
Creek, which for generations was the family sepulchre. 

WILL OF JOHN WASHINGTON. 

" In the name of God, Amen. I, John Washington, of 
Washington Parish, in the county of Westmoreland, in 
Virginia, gentleman, being of good and perfect memory, 
thanks be unto Almighty God for it ; and calling to re- 
membrance the uncertain state of this transitory life, that 
all flesh must yield unto death, do make, constitute, and 
ordain this my last will and testament, and none other. 
And first, being heartily sorry from the bottom of my 
heart, for my sins past, most humbly desiring forgiveness 
of the same from the Almighty God, my Saviour and Re- 
deemer, in whom and by the merits of Jesus Christ I trust 
and believe assuredly to be saved, and to have full remis- 
sion and forgiveness of all my sins, and that my soul with 
my body at the general resurrection shall rise again with 

joy-" 

Again he repeats the same sentiment, hoping " through 
the merits of Jesus Christ's death and passion to possess 
and inherit the kingdom of heaven, prepared for his elect 



io8 WASHINGTON. 

and chosen." He directs his body to be buried on the 
plantation upon which he lived, by the side of his wife and 
two children. He then proceeds to distribute his property, 
which he says it has pleased God to give him " far above 
his deserts." After dividing a number of landed estates 
between his second and surviving wife and his children — 
John, Laurence and Anne — and also his property in Eng- 
land, he directs that a funeral sermon be preached and no 
other funeral kept, and that a tablet with the Ten Com- 
mandments be sent for to England and given to the 
church. He also directs four thousand weight of tobacco 
to be given to the minister. He leaves one thousand 
povinds to his brother-in-law, Thomas Pope, and one thou- 
sand pounds and four thousand weight of tobacco to his 
sister, who had come or Avas coming over to this country. 
He. makes his wife and brother, Laurence, his executors. 
From the above it would be seen that, great as were his 
military talents, being Commander-in-Chief in the Northern 
Neck, high as he stood in the Government, so that the 
parish was called after him, and large. as was his property 
in England and America, he was also a sincerely pious 
man, and in his will emphatically testifies to those great 
Gospel principles which are so prominent in the church of 
his fathers. 

20 Eleanor Washington,, first child of Leonard, second of 
Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, lirst of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was baptized at Warton, county 
Lanca.ster, in 1638. 

20 Leonard Washington, second child of Leonard, was 



WA SHING TON. 1 09 

born at Warton, county Lancaster, and baptized at War- 
ton, county Lancaster, in 1645. Obit 1698. 

20 Christopher Washington, first child of Jolin, first of 
Leonard, first of Robert, first of Leonard, second of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first oi Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin the Dane ; was baptized at Yeland, in 
Warton, county Lancaster, in 16 19. 

20 Richard Washington, first child of Henry, first of Sir 
William, first of Laurence, first of Robert, first of Hon. 
Laurence, first of John, first of Robert, third of Robert, 
first of John, first of John, first of John, second of Rob- 
ert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, 
fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, sec- 
ond of Torfin the Dane ; was born at North Cave, county 
York, about 1640. 

He sold the Manor of North Cave, in 1720. 

21 Richard Washington, first child of Richard, first of 
James, first of D'Arcy, first of Richard, second of James, 
first of Richard, first of Robert, third of Robert, first 
of John, first of Robert, first -of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 
dolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was baptized at Ard- 
wick le Street, county York, in 1673. 

He was buried in 1703. He had issue : 

22 Jaaiks Washing lox, born at Ardwick le Street, 

count}' York, about 1700. 
22 George Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 
county York, about 1703. 



no WASHINGTON. 

22 John Washington, b^rn at Ardwick le Street^ 

county York, about 1705. 
22 Judith Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 1707. 
22 Elizabeth Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 17 10. 
22 Mary Washington, born at Ardwick le Street, 

county York, about 17 12. 

21 James Washington, Coroner, second child of Richard,, 
was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1675^ 

21 Robert Washington, third child of Richard, was born, 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1677. 

21 Elizabeth Washington, fourth child of Richard, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1680. 
Married Peter Hvidson. 

21 Mary Washington, fifth child of Richard, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1682. 
Married Dr. John Neale, second husband. 

21 George Washington, first child of Rev. Francis, sixth 
of James, first of D'Arcy, first of Richard, second of 
James, first of Richard, first of Robert, third of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Peter, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of Robert, first of Wal- 
ter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, 
second of Torfin tlie Dane ; was born at Sprotsborough.^ 
county York, about 1670. 

21 Elizabeth Washington, second child of Rev. Francis, 
was born at Sprotsborough, county York, about 1672. 

21 Anne Washington, third child of Rev. Francis, was 
h(^rn at Sprotsborough, county York, about 167:;. 



WA SUING TON. 1 1 r 

21 Frances Washington, fourth child of Rev. Francis, 
was born at Sprotsborough, county York, about 1677, 

21 Grace Washington, fifth child of Rev. Francis, was 
born at Sprotsborough, county York, about 1680. 

21 Mary Washington, first child of Laurence by first wife, 
fourth of Leonard, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, 
first of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of 
John, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first 
of John, first of John, first of John, second of Robert, 
second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth 
of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of 
Torfin the Dane ; was born at Warton, Eng., about 
1648. 
Remained there at her father's emigration to America, in 

1659. Named in his will. 

21 John Washington, first child by second wife, Jane, of 
Laurence, of Warton, Eng , and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
was born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1660. 

21 Anne Washington, second child of Laurence, was born 

at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1662. 

"She married Major Francis Wright. He was interred 
in a vault on the banks of Bridsre's Creek." 



^C3^ 



21 LAURENCE WASHINGTON, first child of Col. John, by 
second wife, fifth of Leonard, first of Laurence, fi.rst of 
Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Rob- 
ert, first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of 
John, first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; 
was born at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1661. 



1 12 WASHINGTON. 

He resided, and died there in 1697. He was married in 
Gloucester county, Virginia, about 1690, to Mildred, daugh- 
ter of Col. Augustine Warner, of Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia. Issue : 

22 John Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, West- 
moreland covinty, Virginia, about 1692. 
22 Augustine Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Westmoreland county, Virginia, in 1694. 
22 Mildred Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 
Westmoreland county, about 1696. 
** Laurence Washington was interred in the family 
vault, at Bridge's Creek." His widow was married to 
George Gale. 

21 John Washington, second child of Col. John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 
1663. 

21 Elizabeth Washington, third child of Col. John, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, about 
1665. 

She married Thomas Lanier, son of Lewis Lanier, of 
Bordeaux, France, about 1687. Had issue : 

22 Richard Lanier, born at Bridge's Creek, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1688. 
22 Thomas Lanier, born at Bridge's Creek, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1690. 
22 James Lanier, born at Bridge's Creek, Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, about 1692. 
22 Elizabeth Lanier, born at Bridge's Creek, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1695. 
22 Samson Lanier, born at Bridge's Creek, Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, about 1700. 

21 Anne Washington, fourth child of Col. John, was born 



WA SUING TON. 113 

at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 
1667. 

22 James Washington, first child of Richard, first of 
Richard, first of James, first of D'Arcy, first of Rich- 
ard, second of James, first of Richard, first of Robert, 
third of Robert, first of John, first of Robert,, first 
of John, first of Peter, first of John, first of Robert, 
first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second 
of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of.Torfin the Dane; 
was born at Ardvvick le Street, county York, about 1700. 

22 George Washington, Coroner, second child of Rich- 
ard, was born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 
1703. 

22 John Washington, third child of Richard, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1705. 

22 Judith Washington, fourth child of Richard, was born 
at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1707. 

22 Elizabeth Washington, fifth child of Richard, was 
born at Ardwick le Street, county York, about 17 10. 
Married William Hutchinson, merchant, of Yorkshire. 

Children sfiven in his line. 



&■ 



22 Mary Washington, sixth child of Richard, was born at 
Ardwick le Street, county York, about 1712. 
Married John Smith, of Skelton Grange, county York. 

22 John Washington, first child of Laurence, first of Col. 
John, fifth of Leonard, first of Laurence, first of Lau- 
rence, first of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, 
first of J'ohn, first of Robert, first of Jolni, first of John, 

8 



1 14 WA SUING TON. 

first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Ak- 
aris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia, 
about 1692. 

He settled and died in Gloucester county, Virginia. He 
married Catharine Whiting, of Gloucester county, Virginia.. 
He was buried in Gloucester county. He had issue : 

23 Warner Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 4715. 
23 Henry Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1718. 
23 Mildred Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1720. Married. 
23 Elizabeth Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1722. Died unmarried. 
23 Catharine Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1724. Married Fielding Lewis. 
23 Laurence Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1726. 
23 Augustine Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, about 1728. 
23 Frances Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, about 1730. 

22 AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON, second child of Laurence, 
was born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, A. D. 1694. 
He removed in 1722 to an estate in Stafford county, 
nearly opposite Fredericksburgh on the Rappahannock, 
where he died, 12 April, 1743, aged 49. He owned several 
fine estates on the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers. He 
was married, 20 April, 1715, to Jane, daughter of Caleb 
Butler, of Westmoreland county, by whom he had 4 children. 
She died 24 Nov., 1728. He had issue : 

23 BuTLETi Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1716. Died young. 



WA SUING TON. 1 1 5 

23 Laurence Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 

Virginia, A. D. 17 18. 
23 Augustine Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 
• Virginia, A. D. 1720. 

23 Jane Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1722. Died Jan. 17, 1735. 
His wife died in Stafford county, Virginia, 24 Nov., 1728, 
and was interred in the Family Vault at Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, near the remains of Colonel John Washington, 
the emigrant. 

He was "married, second, in Lancaster county, Virginia, 
6 Mar., 1731, to Mary, daughter of Colonel William Ball, of 
Lancaster county, Virginia. (She died 25 Aug., 1789, aged 
^2.) By whom he had six children : 

23 George Washington, born at Wakefield, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, 11 O. S. 22 N. S. Feb., 
1732. 
23 Betty Washington, born at Wakefield, Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, 20 June, 1733. 
23 Samuel Washington, born at Wakefield, Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, 16 Nov., 1734. 
23 John Augustine Washington, born at Wakefield, 

Westmoreland county, Virginia, 13 Jan., 1736. 
23 Charles Washington, born at Wakefield, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, 2 May, 1738. 
23 Mildred Washington, born at Wakefield, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, 21 June, 1739. Died 23 
Oct., 1740. 

" Augustine Washington and Mary Ball was Married 
the Sixth of March, i-jf^ 

George Washington son to Augustine & Mary his wife 

, was Born ye nth Day of February 173^ about 10 in the 

Morning & was Baptiz'd the 5th of April following Mrs 

Beverly Whiting & Capt Christopher Brooks Godfathers 

and Mrs Mildred Gregory Godmother. 



1 1 6 WA SHING TON. 

Betty Washington was Born the 20th of June 1733 about 
6 in ye Mornin Departed this life the 31st of March 1797 
at 4 Oclock 

Samuel Washington was Born ye 16 of Nov. 1734 about 
<3 in ye Mornin 

Jane Washington Daughter of Augustine and Jane 
Washington Departed this Life Jany 17th 1734 

John Augustine Washington was Born ye 13th of Jany. 
about 2 in ye Morn i73g 

Charles Washington was Borne ye 2 day of May 
about 3 in ye Morne 1738 

Mildred Washington was Born ye 21st of June 1739 
about 9 at Night. 

Mildred Washington Departed this Life Octr ye 23d 1740 
being tliursday about 12 a Clock at Noon Aged i Year & 4 
Months 

Augustine Washington Departed this Life ye 12th Day 
of April 1743 Aged 49 Years" 

The above is copied from the Farhily Bible of Augustine 
Washington. 

Augustine Washington purchased the estate known as 
Mount Vernon, and at his death it became the property of 
his eldest son Laurence. He left large possessions dis- 
tributed by will among his children. To Laurence the 
estate on the banks of the Potomac, with other real prop- 
erty, and several shares in iron works. To Augustine, the 
second son by the first marriage, the old homestead and 
estate at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county. 

The children by the second marriage were well provided 
for, and George, when he came of age, was to have the 
house and lands on the Rappahannock. 

22 Mildred Washington, tnird child of Laurence, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1696. 



WASHING TON. 1 1 7 

" Her first husband was named Gregory, by whom she 
had three daughters : 

23 Frances, born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 

1716. 
23 Mildred, born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 

1718. 
23 Elizabeth, born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 
1720. 
"Wlio married three brothers, Col. Francis Thornton, Col. 
John Thornton, and Reuben Thornton, all of Spottsylvania 
county, Virginia. She had for her second husband, Col. 
Henry Willis, of Fredericksburgh, and by him the present 
23 CoL. Lewis Willis, of Fredericksburgh." — Wash- 
ington s Letter, 2 May, 1792. 

22 Richard Lanier, first child of Thomas Lanier, the son 
of Lewis Lanier, of Bordeaux, France, and of Elizabeth 
Washington Lanier, third child of Col. John Washing- 
ton, of Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, about 1688. 

22 Thomas I^anier, second child of Thomas Lanier, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1690. 

I 

22 James Lanier, third child of Thomas Lanier, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1692. 

22 Elizabeth Lanier, fourth child of Thomas Lanier, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1695. 

22 Samson Lanier, fifth child of Thomas Lanier, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1700. Had issue : 
23 Lewis, born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1726. 
23 Buckner, " " " " 1728. 



ii8 WASHINGTON. 

23 BuRRiLL, born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1732. 

23 WiNNIFRED, " " " " 1735. 

23 Nancy, " " " " 1737. 

23 Rebecca, " " " " 1740. 

zz Lewis Lanier, above, married Miss Ball, sister of 
General Washington's mother. Had son : 

24 James Lanier, Planter, born in Southamp- 
ton county, Virginia, February 2, 1750. He 
removed to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1789, and to 
Bourbon county, Kentucky, in 1791. Thence to 
Pendleton, Kentucky, where he died April 27, 
1806. He was married about 1774, to Sarah 
Chalmers (born October 30, 1755), of Scotland. 
(She was nearly related to the celebrated Dr. 
Chalmers.) Had issue : 

25 Alexander Chalmers Lanier, born in 
Southampton county, Virginia, 31 Jan., 1779. 
25 James Walters Lanier, born about 1781. 
He was a svirgeon in the United States 
army, in 1812. He died without issue. 
25 A daughter and a son, died s. p. 
25 Alexander Chalmers Lanier (above), was 
Court Clerk of the County Courts of South- 
ampton county. He removed to Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, A. D. 1800, and to Eaton, 
Preble county, Ohio, A. D. 1807. He died 
in Lancaster, Garrard county, Kentucky, 25 
Mar., 1820. He was married in Southamp- 
ton county, Virginia, April 30, 1797, to 
Drusilla Cleaves Doughty (who was born 
Mar. 27, 1778, and died at Madison, Indiana, 
Feb. 8, 1838). His only child was : 

26 James Franklin Doughty Lanier, 
born at Washington, in Beaufort county, 



WA SHING TON. 1 1 9 

North Carolina, Nov. 22, 1800. He 
was taken to Eaton, Preble county, 
Ohio, in 1807, to Madison, Indiana, in 
1817. Removed to New York in 1849, 
where he now (1878) resides, at No. 16 
West Tenth Street. 

He was married, first, at Madison, 
Indiana, Dec. 8, 1819, to Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Gardner, of Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky. (She died April 15, 
1846.) He was married, secondly, at 
Madison, Ijadiana, 20 Jan., 1848, to Mary, 
daughter of John McClure, of Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania. Issue by first wife : 
27 Alexander Chalmers Lanier, 
born at Madison, Indiana, on Fri- 
day, Oct. 6, 1820. Resides there 
(1878), not married. 
27 Elizabeth Frances Lanier, born 
at Madison, Indiana, on Tues- 
day, Feb. 26, 1822. Removed to 
Washington, D. C, in 1869, now 
(1878) there. She was married at 
• Madison, Indiana, Mar. 11, 1841, by 
Rev. James Johnston, to Gen. Wil- 
liam McKee Dunn, Judge Advo- 
cate, and General in the United 
States army, son of Williamson 
(and Mirian) Dunn, of Jefiferson 
county, Indiana. She has issue : 
28 William McKee Dunn, born 
at Madison, Indiana, Aug. 20, 
1843. Now (1876) Major in the 
United States army, stationed 
at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 



lao WA SHING TON. 



He was on General Grant's 
staff, befpre the battle of Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi. He was 
married about 1844, to Mary, 
daughter of Hon. Lott Mor- 
rell (Secretary in 1876 of Uni- 
ted States Treasury, at Wash- 
ington), of Augusta, Maine. 
Has two children. 
28 Frances Elizabeth Dunn, 
born at Madison, Indiana, Dec. 
(i^ 1847. Now (1876) at Wash- 
inarton, D. C. • She was married 
about 1870, to David R. McKee, 
head of the Associated Press at 
Washington. Has two chil- 
dren. 
28 Lanier Dunn, born at Mad- 
ison, Indiana, Aug. 2, 185 1. 
Now (1876) on the Wheeler 
Expedition Survey at the West. 
Not married. 
28 Mary Dunn, born at Madison, 
Indiana, ' Sept. 22, 1853. At 
home. Not married. 
28 George Marshall Dunn, 
born at Madison, Indiana, Mar. 
20, 1856, Now (1876) on the 
Survey with his brother Lanier. 
27 Drusilla Ann Lanier, born 
at Madison, Indiana, Dec. 21, 1824. 
Now (1876) there. She was mar- 
ried there, in 1844, to John Robert 
Cravens, of Madison, Indiana, and 
has ten children. 



WA SUING TON. 1 2 r 

27 Margaret D. Lanier, born at 
Madison, Indiana, on Saturday,, 
Feb. 25, 1827. 

27 John James Lanier, born at Mad- 
ison, Indiana, on Thursday, July 
23, 1829, and died there, 20 April, 
1836. 

27 Mary Lanier, born at Madison, 
Indiana, on Monday, Aug. 20, 1832. 
Removed to New York, and now 
(1876) resides at No. 15 West Ninth 
Street. She was married in New 
York, about 1858, to John Cameron 
Stone, of New York. Has two 
children : 

1 Elizabeth Gardner Stone, 
born Mar. 8, 185 1. 

2 Mary Louisa Stone, born 
April 21, i860. 

27 Louisa Morris Lanier, born at 
Madison, Indiana, on Saturday, 
Jan. 31, 1835. Now (1876) resides 
in Madison, at the house of her 
sister, Mrs. Cravens. Not married. 

27 Charles Lanier, born at Madison,. 
Indiana, Jan. 19. 1837. Removed 
about 1849 to, and now (1878) re- 
sides in New York, No. 30 East 
Thirty-seventh Street. He was 
married in New York, by Rev. 
Gardiner Spring, Oct. 7, 1857, tO' 
Sarah E., daughter of Thomas 
Egleston, of New York. Has four 
children : 

• I James Frederick Doughty 
Lanier, born July 25, 1858. 



J 22 WA SHING TON. 

2 Sarah Egleston Lanier, born 
April 8, 1862. 

3 Fannie Lanier, born Aug. 17, 
1864. 

4 Elizabeth .Gardner Lanier, 
born Oct. 29, 1870. 

Issue of J. F. D. Lanier, by second wife : 

27 Jane Lanier, born at Madison, 
Indiana, in Jan., 1849, and died there 
in 1857. 
27 James Lanier, born at Madison, 
Indiana, A. D. 185 1, and died on 
Staten Island, in 1856. 
27 Katie McClure Lanier, born in 
New York, 7 Jan. 1858. Resides 
with her father, unmarried. 

23 Warner Washington, first child of John, first of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, fifth of Leonard, first of Lau- 
rence, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first 
of John, first of John, first of John, second of Robert, 
second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth 
of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of 
Torfin the Dane ; was born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
about 1 7 15. He removed to Frederick county. Died in 
1791. Married first, Elizabeth, daughter of Col. William 
Macon, of New Kent county, Virginia. Had one child : 
24 Warner Washington, born in Gloucester county, 
Virginia, 15 April, 175 1. 
Married secondly, at Fairfax, Virginia, about 1764, to 
Hannah, daughter of Hon. William Fairfax, of Fairfax, 
Clarke county, Virginia (then Frederick county). Chil- 
dren : 

24 Mildred Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia, 
A. D. 1765. 



WASHINGTON. 123 

24 Hannah Washington, born at Fairfax, Virginia, 

April, 1767. Married P. B. Whiting, of Elmington, 

Gloucester county, Virginia. 
24 Catharine Washington, born at Belvoir, Virginia, 

7 April, 1769. 
24 Elizabeth Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia, 

A. D. 1771. 
24 Louisa Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia, 

about 1775. 
24 Fairfax Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia, 

about 1778. 
24 Whiting Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia, 

about 1780. 
After his second marriage, Warner Washington removed 
to Frederick county, Virginia, where he died in 179 1. 

23 Henry Washington, second child of John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 17 18. 
He married a daughter of Col. Thacker, of Middlesex 
county, Virginia, and had, beside two or three daughters, a 
son, viz.: 

24 Thacher Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, about 1740. 

He married a daughter of Sir John Peyton, and had 
several children. 

23 Mildred Washington, third child of John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1720. 
Married twice ; had no children. 

23 Elizabeth Washington, fourth child of John, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1722. Died un- 
mari-ied. 

23 Catharine Washington, fifth child of John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1724. 



124 WASHINGTON. 

She married Col. Fielding Lewis. Had a son and a 
daughter : 

24 John Lewis, born at , about 1745. 

24 Frances Lewis, born at , about 1748, and died 

without issue. 
(After the death of his wife Catharine, Col. Lewis 
married Betty Washington, second child of Augustine 
Washington by second wife.) 

23 Laurence Washington, sixth child of John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 
1726. Died s. p. 
He bequeathed his estate to his cousin. General George 

Washington. 

23 Augustine Washington, seventh child of John, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1728. He had 
issue : 

24 William Washington, born at Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, about 1750. 

23 Francis Washington, eighth child of John, was born 
at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1770. 

23 Major Laurence Washington, second child by first 
wife (Butler, first child, died young) of Augustine, second 
of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, Eng., and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; was born at Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, in 1718. 

In 1733 he was sent to England to complete his education. 
Returned in 1742. He served in the campaign in the West 
Indies 1740-2, Avith Admiral Vernon, and died at Mount 
Vernon, Virginia, 26 July, 1752, at the age of 34. He left a 
wife and infant daughter. He inherited an estate from his 



WASHINGTON. 125 

■father Augustine at his death, in April, 1743, in Fairfax coun- 
ty, lying eight miles bchnv Alexandria, and sixteen from the 
citv of Washington. It was named by him, '• Mount Ver- 
non," in honor of Admiral Verncjn, of the English na\-y, 
with vvdiom he had been intimate in the campaign of 1740-2. 
At his death it descended to his next oldest brother George, 
and it became his chosen home, and the place of his death 
and burial. 

■' Major Laurence Washington died A. D. 1752, aged 34, 
and was interred in a vault which he had caused to be 
erected at Mount \'ernon, in Fairfax county, Virginia, 
where he settled after he returned from his Carthagena ex- 
pedition." — Washington Letter, May 2, 1792. 

" It was willed by General Washington to his nephew, 
John Bushrod Washington, son of John Augustine, after 
whose death it descended to his son, John Augustine Wash- 
ington, who was, while aid to General Robert E. Lee with 
the rank of Colonel, killed near Cheat Mountain, in Sept., 
1861." 

Major Laurence Washington was a member of the House 
of Burgesses and Adjutant-General of the District, with 
the rank of Major and a regular salary. 

19 July, 1743, he married Anna, eldest daughter of Hon. 
William Fairfax, of Belvoir, Fairfax county, Virginia. He 
now gave up all thoughts of foreign service, and settled on 
his estate, which he named Mount Vernon. Children of 
Major Laurence Washington : 

24 Jank Washinu.ton, born at Mount Vernon, 27 Sept., 

1744. Died in Jan., 1745. 
54 Faikfa.x Washing roN. born at Mount Vernon-, 22 

Aug., 1747. Died Oct.. 1747. 
24 Mm DKi 1) \VAs.HiM.roN, born at Mount V^crnou, 28 

Cii^pL., 1748. Died 1749. 
24 SAKArl4yA^^Hl^'(; roN. born at Mount Vernon, 7 Nov., 

\ 



12 6 IV A SHING TON. 

23 Augustine Washington, third child of Augustine, was 
born at Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1720. 
He settled there at the old homestead. It was at his 
home that his half brother George resided, whilst attend- 
ing the select school of Mr. Williams. 

" He married, in 1743, Anne, daughter and co-heiress of 



"^ 



Col. William Aylett, Esq., of Westmoreland county, by 
whom he had many children, all of whom died in their 
nonage and single, except Elizabeth, Anne and William." 
— Letter of General Washington, May 2, 1792. He had issue :. 
24 Elizabeth Washington, born at Wakefield,. 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1750. Married 
Alexander Spotswood. 
24 JaxVE Washington, born at Wakefield, Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, about 1752. Married Col. John 
Thornton. 
24 Anne Washington, born at Wakefield, Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, about 1753. Married Burdet Ash- 
ton. 
24 William Augustine Washington, born at Wake- 
field, Bridge's Creek, Virginia, Nov. 25, 1757. 
" Augustine Washington lived at the anc^nt mansion,, 
at Wakefield, and was buried in the family vault, at 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia." 

23 Jane Washington, fourth child of Augustine, was borrt 
at Bridge's Creek. Died young. 

23 GEORGE WASHINGTON, Planter, General and Comman- 
der-in-Chief of the American armies, and first President 
of the United States, was the first child by second Avife, 
of Augustine Washington, of Bridge's Creek, Virginia.^ 
the second child of Laurence, of Bridge's Creel:^ Vir- 
ginia, the first child of Col. John, of Warton Lancaster, 
England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, the- filth child of 
Leonard, of WartOR, county Lancaster, England, the 



WASHINGTON. 127 

first child of Laurence, of Warton, the first child of 
Laurence, of Warton, the first child of Laurence, of 
Warton, the first child of Thomas, of Warton, the first 
child of Robert, of Warton, the first child of John, of 
Warton, the first child of Robert, of Warton, the first 
child of John, of Warton, the first child of John, of War- 
ton, the first child of John, of Warton, the second child 
of Robert, of Warton, the second child of Robert, of 
Kenneford, county Lancaster, the second child of Rob- 
ert de Washington, Lord of Milburne, or Welleburne, 
county Westmoreland, the first child of Robert de Wash- 
ington, Lord of Milburne, or Welleburne, the first child 
of Walter fil Bondo de Washington, called also Walter 
de Washington, the fourth son of Bondo fil Akaris, or 
Akary, the second son of Akary fil Bardolf, Lord of 
Ravensworth, county York, — one of the great vassals 
of Stephen, third Earl of Richmond, — the first child of 
Bardolf, Lord of Ravensworth, in Richmondshire, the 
second son of Torfin the Dane ; who was the founder of 
the Washington family in England, who was the fourth 
son of Sigurd, Earl of the Orkney Isles, the son of Earl 
Lodver, the third son of Torfidur, Earl of the Orkneys 
A. D. 942, the first son of Earl Einar, the fourth son of 
Earl Rogvald (These Earls were known as "The Lords 
OF THE Isles "). Rogvald was Jarl or Earl of Moere, 
A. D. 885. He was the third son of Eisten Glumru (or 
Vors), the son of Ivar, whose wife was daughter of 
Eisten Glumru, King of Frondheim (or Thrandin), A. D. 
840, the son of Halfdan, King of Frondheim, the son 
of Eisten, King of Frondheim, the son of Throud (or 
Frouds), King of Frondheim, the son of Harold Hilde- 
tand (or Hildetur, King of Denmark, A. D. 647), the son 
of Queen Auda Diuphaudza (wife- of Rerik, King of 
Holmgard), the daughter of Ivar Vidfadme, King of 
Denmark, A. D. 588, the son of Halfdan III., King of 
Denmark, A. D. 548, the first son of Erode VII., King of 



128 WA SHING TON. 

Denmark, A. D. 522, the son of Frode VI., King of Den- 
mark, A. D. 494, the son of Roe, King of Denmark, A. D. 
460, the son of Halfdan II., King of Denmark, A. D. 
456, died A. D. 457, the second son of Frode IV., King 
of Denmark, A. D. 348, the son of Friedlief III., King 
of Denmark, A. D. 324, the son of Hnlfdan I., King of 
Denmark, A. D. 310, the son of Frode III., King of 
Denmark, A. D. 270, the son of Dan Mykellati, King of 
Denmark, A. D. 190 (whose wife was daughter of Olaf, 
King of Denmark and Zealand, A. D. 140), the son of 
Vermund, King of Denmark, A. D. 87, the son of Frode 
II., King of Denmark, A. D. 59, son of Frode Fredigod, 
King of Denmark, B. C. 23 (and was King in Denmark 
in the time of Christ), the first son of Friedlief I., the 
first King of Denmark, B. C. 40 (of the Skioldingers, or 
descendants of Skiold, the son of Odin), the son of 
Skiold, who reigned at Ledi-a, Zealand, and at Jutland, 
about 40 years B. C, the fifth son of Odin, the founder 
of Scandinavia, B. C. 70 (see Introduction, page v.), from 
whom was descended, in 55 generations, George Wash- 
ington, who was born at Wakefield, nth O. S. and 22 
N. S. Feb., 1732, near Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland 
county, Virginia, in the old Washington Homestead, on 
the estate where his great-grandfather, Col. John Wash- 
ington, settled in 1659. He died at Mount Vernon, 14 Dec, 
1799. His tomb is the Mecca of America. He was married 
at the White House, New Kent county, Virginia, a short 
distance from Williamsburgh, 6 Jan., 1759, to Martlia 
{Widow of Col. Daniel Parke Custis (who died in 1757), 
of the White House, Virginia, at the time of her mar- 
riage), daughter of John Dandridge, of New Kent coun- 
ty, Virginia. The marriage was celebrated in the good 
old hospitable Virginia style, amid a joyous assemblage 
of relatives and friends. He adopted, when they were 
very young : 



( 




B 






^ 






^ 
^ 







^^^^^ 



WASHINGTON. 129 

Eleanor Parke Custis, and 

George Washington Parke Custis. 
These were the children of John Parke Custis, the only- 
child of Mrs. Martha Washington {nee Custis), by her first 
husband, Daniel Parke Custis, that lived to majority. 

" Claymont, Del., Oct. 26, 1876. 
" Harewood is the name of the estate on which the Wash- 
ington family have resided for a long period. It was Gen- 
eral Washington's country residence. The mansion is a fine 
old pretentious house of the old style. It is built of lime- 
stone, and has a costly finish in the interior. The property 
is owned by my sister, who has lived there many years. 

"JOHN B. CLEMSON." 

Washington's birthplace on the potomac. 

" This house commanded a beautiful view over many 
miles of the Potomac, and opposite shore of Maryland ; 
it contained four rooms on tlic ground floor, and others in 
the attic. Such was the birthplace of our great and loved 
Washington. Not a vestige now remains of it ; onlv a 
stone placed there by his wife's grandson, George Wash- 
ington Parke Custis, marks the site of the " old low-pitched 
farm house," and an inscription denotes its being the birtli- 
place of Washington, whose life and wonderful acliicve- 
ments as a soldier and statesman, are written as witli a 
sunbeam upon the brilliant historic page which records 
the memorable struggle and liberation of the infant col- 
onies from the tyranny of the mother country, and chron- 
icles the stupendous growth of the vigorous young 
Republic during the first eight years of its existence." 

a WASHINGTON ROMANCE. 

A LETTER FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON ACKNOWLEDGING THE POWER 

OF LOVE. 

" In a collection of rare and valuable autograph letters we 
9 



I30 WASHINGTON. 

find the accompanying letter written by General Washington 
at the age of twenty-six, and never before made public. 
The present owner purchased it in England some years 
ago for the sum of ;^i5, where it was probably taken by 
members of the Fairfax family of Virginia. The letter is 
addressed to Sarah Fairfax, at Belvoir. This lady was a 
Miss Gary, to whom Washington at one time offered his 
hand, but was refused for his friend and comrade George 
William Fairfax. Irving asserts that it was a sister of Mrs. 
Fairfax, Miss Mary Gary, afterward Mrs. Edward Ambler. 
We have the authority of Mrs. Gonstance G. Harrison, a 
descendant of Lord Fairfax, who says, in a paper called 'A 
Little Gentennial Lady,' piiblished in Scribners Monthly of 
July, 1876, that Sally Gary, Mrs. Fairfax, was the lady for 
whom Washington had a tenderness. Mrs. Harrison says : — 

" ' It is fair to say that papers which have never been 
given to the public set this question beyond a doubt. Mrs. 
George William Fairfax, the object of George Washing- 
ton's early and passionate love, lived to an advanced age, 
in Bath, England, widowed, childless and utterly infirm. 
Upon her death, at the age of eighty-one, letters, (still in 
possession of the Fairfax family,) were found among her 
effects, showing that Washington had never forgotten the 
influence of his youthful disappointment.' 

" It is hardly probable that Washington means to express 
his love for Mrs. Gustis, to whom he alludes here, for her 
husband was then living — in fact, did not die until twenty 
odd years after the date of this letter. For the matter of 
that, Mrs. Fairfax's husband did not die until 1787. The 
following letter is, without doubt, one of those letters 
which Mrs. Harrison declares will ' set this question be- 
yond a doubt.' It v^ill be found very interesting, as it 
shows Washington in quite a new light. Even as a lover 




i).;i*a;i'i; '7 



WASHINGTON. 131 

he has all the stateliness of the General and the Father of 
His Country : — 

"'Camp at Fort Cumberland, 12th September, 1758. 
" 'Dear Madam : — 

" ' Yesterday I was honored with your short but very 
agreeable favor of the first inst. — how joyfully I catch at 
the happy occasion of renewing a correspondence which 
I feared was disrelished on your part, I leave to time, that 
never failing expositor of all things — and to a monitor 
equally faithful in my own breast to testify. In silence I 
now express my joy. Silence, which in some cases — I 
wish the present — speaks more intelligently than the sweet- 
est eloquence. 

" ' If you allow that any honor can be derived from my 
opposition to our present system of management, you de- 
stroy the merit of it entirely in me by attributing my 
anxiety to the animating prospect of possessing Mrs. Cus- 
tis — when — I need not name it — guess yourself — Should 
not my own Honor and country's welfare be the excite- 
ment ? 'Tis true, I profess myself a votary of Love — I 
acknowledge that a lady is in the case — and further I con- 
fess-that this lady is known to you. — Yes, madam, as well 
as she is to one who is too sensible of her charms to deny 
the Power whose Influence he feels and must ever submit 
to. I feel the force of her amiable beauties in the recollec- 
tion of a thousand tender passages that I could wish to 
obliterate, till I am bid to revive them, — but experience, 
alas ! sadly reminds me how impossible this is, — and evin- 
ces an opinion which I have long entertained, that there is a 
Destiny, which has the sovereign control of our actions — not 
to be resisted bv the strongest efforts of Human Nature. 

" You have drawn me, dear madam, or rather I have 
drawn myself, into an honest confession of a simple Fact 
— misconstrue not my meaning — doubt it not, nor expose 
it — The world has no business to know the object of my 



132 



WASHINGTON. 



Love — declared in this manner to — you — when I want to 
conceal it. One thing above all things in this world I wish 
to know, and only one person of your acquaintance can 
solve me that or guess my meaning — but adieu to this till 
happier times, if I ever shall see them. The hours at pres- 
ent are melancholy dull, neither the rugged toils of war, 

nor the gentler conflict of A B s is in my choice. 

I dare believe, you are as happy as you say. I wish I was 
happy also. Mirth, good humor, ease of mind and — what 
else? Cannot fail to render you so and consummate your 
wishes. 

" ' If one agreeable lady could almost wish herself a fine 
gentleman for the sake of another ; I apprehend, that 
many fine gentlemen will wish themselves finer e'er Mrs. 
Spotsvvood is possest. She has already become a reigning 
toast in this camp ; and many there are in it, who intend 
(fortune favoring) to make honorable scars speak the full- 
ness of their merit, and be a messenger of their Love to Her. 

''' I cannot easily forgive the unseasonable haste of my 
last express, if he deprived me thereby of a single word 
you intended to add, — the time of the present messenger 
is, as the last might have been, entirely at your disposal. I 
can't expect to hear from my friends more than this "once 
before the fate of the expedition will some how or other be 
determined. I therefore beg to know when you set out for 
Hampton, and when you expect to return to Belvoir again 
— and I should be glad also to hear of your speedy depart- 
ure as I shall thereby hope for your return before I get 
down ; the disappointment of seeing your family would 
give me much concern. — From any thing I can yet see 'tis 
hardly possible to say when we shall finish, I don't think 
there is a probability of it till the middle of November. 
Your letter to Capt'n Gist I forwarded by a safe hand the 
moment it came to me. His answer shall be carefully 
transmitted. 

"'Col. Mercer, to whom I delivered your message and 




m 



Eag^by J.CButtre. 



iF«^rK¥[}fliRi w,5;\©[k;ck(S¥©k, 



"Pfi-OM STUAKT G nCTlIRB, 



WA SHING TON. 1 33 

compliments, joins me very heartily in wishing you and 
the Ladies of Belvoir the perfect enjoyment of every hap- 
piness this world affords, be assured that I am, Dr madam, 
with the most unfeigned regard, yr most obedient and most 
oblig'd H'ble serv't, 

'"G. WASHINGTON. 
" ' N. B. Many accidents happening (to use a vulgar say- 
ing) between the cup and the lip, I choose to make the 
exchange of carpets myself, since I find you will not do 
me the honor to accept mine.' " — Herald, Mar. 30, 1877. 

PRESIDENT Washington's levee. 

" At three o'clock the visitor was introduced to the dining- 
room, from which all seats had been removed for the time. 
On entering, he saw the tall, manly figure of Washington, 
clad in black silk velvet, his hair in full dress, powdered 
and gathered behind in a large silk bag, yellow gloves on 
his harftls, holding a cocked hat with a black cockade in it, 
and the edges adorned with a black feather about an inch 
deep. He wore knee and shoe buckles and a long sword. 
He stood always in front of the fireplace, with his face to- 
wards the door cjf entrance. The visitor was conducted to 
him, and his name distinctly announced. He received his 
visitor with a dignified bow in a manner avoiding to shake 
hands, even with best friends. As visitors came, they 
formed a circle round the room ; and, at a quarter past 
three the door closed, and the circle was formed for that 
day. He then began on the right, and spoke to each vis- 
itor, calling him by name and exchanging a few words. 
When he had completed his circuit he resumed his first 
position, and the visitors, approaching him in succession, 
bowed and retired. By four o'clock this ceremony was 
over. These facts have been learned in general from the 
reminiscences of General Sullivan. Mrs. Washington's 
levees were every Friday evening, at which occasion the 



134 WASHINGTON. 

General was always present. It was an occasion for emu- 
lous and aspiring belles to essay to win his attention. But 
he was never familiar ; his countenance uniformly, even 
there, preserved its habitual gravity. A lady of his family 
said it was his habit, also, when without company, and that 
she only remembered him once to have made a hearty 
laugh in a narrative and incident in which she was a party. 
The truth was, his deportment was unavoidably grave ; it 
was sobriety, stopping short of sadness. His presence in- 
spired a veneration and a feeling of awe rarely experienced 
in the presence of any man. His mode of speaking was 
slov/ and deliberate, not as though he was in search of fine 
words, but that he might utter those only adapted to his 
purpose." 

"George Washington, first President of the United 
States, was born at Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, 
Virginia, 22 Feb., 1732, and died at Mount Vernon, 14 
Dec, 1799. Fourth son of Augustine. John, his ancestor, 
came to Virginia, A. D. 1659. He was educated by a pri- 
vate tutor, and became a surveyor, and was Adjutant-Gen- 
eral, 175 1. He was sent on a mission to the French com- 
mission on the Ohio, by Governor Dinwiddle, 31 Oct., 1753, 
returning 16 Jan., 1754, after much suffering. He was 
appointed Lieutenant-Colonel, Mar., 1754, and 28 May, 
•captured a French detachment, near Great Meadows, kill- 
ing its commander, Jumonville ; surrendered his command 
at Fort Necessity to a superior French force, 4 July. 1754 ; 
volunteer aid to General Braddock, at the battle of Mo- 
nongahela, 9 July, 1755 ; married, 6 Jan., 1759, to Martha, 
widow of John Parke Curtis, and daughter of John Dan- 
•dridge ; member of the House of Burgesses, 1760-75 ; dele- 
gate to the first Congress, Sept. 1774, and to the second, 
May, 1775, by which (15 June) he was chosen commander- 
in-chief of the American army, on the nomination of John 
Adams, and took command at Cambridge, Mass., 3 July. 




>^; 



K 









^ 












xK 



w 



\ 



^^^ 






^ 



WASHINGTON. 135 

He forced the British to evacuate Boston, 17 March, 1776 ; 
lost the battles of Brooklyn, 27 Aug., White Plains, 28 
Oct., gained the victories of Trenton and Princeton, Dec. 
26, and Jan. 3, was defeated at Brandyw^ine, 11 Sept., 1777, 
and at Germantown, 4 Oct., 1777, fought an indecisive 
battle v^^ith Sir H. Clinton, 28 June, 1778, at Monmouth, 
and, in conjunction with the French army of Rochambeau, 
■and the fleet of De Grasse, captured the army of Corn- 
wallis, at Yorktown, 19 Oct., 1781, virtually ending the war. 
On 23 Dec, 1783, he resigned his command and retired to 
Mount Vernon. He was President of the Convention that 
formed the United States Constitution, 1787 ; inaugurated 
President of the United States at New York, 30 April, 1789, 
and returned to private life on the expiration of his second 
term, 4 March, 1797. In Sept., 1796, he published his Fare- 
well Address. See Life and Correspondence, by Sparks, 
12 vols. 8vo. Lives by Ramsay, Marshall, Bancroft, and 
Irving. 

" Martha Washington, the widow of George Waslaington, 
■died May 22, 1802, aged 70. She was the daughter of Mr. 
Dandridge, of the county of New Kent, in Virginia, and 
w^as born in May, 1732. Her first husband was Col. Daniel 
P. Custis, who lived on the Pamunkey river, a branch 
■of York river. Of the children by this marriage, Martha 
■died in womanhood at Mount Vernon, in 1770, and John 
Custis, in 1781, at the siege of Yorkton, aged 27, leaving 
several children. She married Washington in 1759. Dur- 
ing the war she was accustomed to spend the winters at 
headquarters. The remains of husband and wife rest in 
the same vault. She was amiable and dignified, and 
adorned with the Christian virtues, and cheered with the 
Christian hope as she went down to the grave. 

" Washington's close identification with the early history 
of our country, during his entire life, is without a parallel 
in the history of men or nations. Of all the great and good 
men our country has produced, he, whom the gallant Lee 



136 WASHINGTON. 

aptly called "The Father of his Country," stands foremost 
in the eyes of our own people and in the estimation of 
mankind. The whole world is filled with his glory, and 
even after the moons of a century have come and gone, the 
radiance of his glorious character shines with a lustre the 
ages cannot dim. Let all men study the life and character 
of this truly wonderful man. Let him ever be cited as a 
model for all who aspire to fame, for their imitation in 
every duty which adorns and dignifies distinguished men. 

GENERAL WASHINGTON'S WILL. 

" In the name of God, Amen. I George Washington of 
Mount Vernon a citizen of the United States and lately 
President of the same, do make ordain and declare this 
Instrument, which is written with my own hand and every 
page thereof subscribed with my name, to be my last will 
& testament, revoking all others. — 

" Inipriiniis All my debts, of which there are but few, 
and none of magnitude, are to be punctually and speedily 
paid and the legacies hereinafter bequeathed, are to be dis- 
charged as soon as circumstances will permit, and in the 
manner directed. 

" Item — To my dearly beloved wife ISIartha Washington, 
I give and bequeath the use, profit and benefit of my whole 
Estate, real and personal, for the term of her natural life : 
except such parts thereof as are specially disposed of here- 
after : My improved lot in the Town of Alexandria, sit- 
uated on Pitt and Cameron Streets, I give to her & her 
heirs forever : as T also do my household and kitchen fur- 
niture of every sort and kind, with the liquors and groceries 
which may be on hand at the time of my decease ; to be used 
and disposed of as she may think proper. 

" Item. Upon the decease of my wife, it is my will and de- 
sire, that all the slaves \/hich I hold in my own right, shall 
receive their freedom. — To emancipate them during her 



WASHINGTON. 137 

life, would, tho' earnestly wished by me, be attended with 
such insuperable difficulties, on account of their intermix- 
ture by marriages with the dower negroes, as to excite the 
most painful sensations, if not disagreeable consequences 
from the latter, while both descriptions are in the occu- 
pancy Oi the same proprietor : it not being in my power, 
under the tenure by which the dower negroes are held, to 
manumit them. — And whereas among those* who will 
receive freedom according to this devise, there may be 
some, who from old age, or bodily infirmities : and others, 
who on account of their infancy, that will be unable to 
support themselves : it is my will and desire that all who 
come under the first and second description, shall be com- 
fortably clothed and fed by my heirs, while they live : and 
that such of the latter description as have no parents liv- 
ing, or if living are unable, or unwilling to provide for 
them, shall be bound by the Court, until they shall arrive 
at the age of twenty-five years : and in cases where no 
record can be produced, whereby their ages can be ascer- 
tained, the Judgment of the Court, upon its own view 
of the subject, shall be adequate & final. The negroes 
thus bound, are (by their Masters or Mistresses), to be 
taught to read and write, & to be brought up to some 
useful occupation, agreeably to the Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Virginia, providing for the support of orphan 
& other poor children. And I do hereby expressly forbid 
the sale, or transportation out of the said Commonwealth 
of any Slave I may die possessed of, under any pretence 
whatsoever. And I do moreover most pointedly, and most 
solemnly enjoin it upon my Executors hereafter named, or 
the survivors of them, to see that this clause, respecting 
slaves, and every part thereof, be religiously fulfilled at the 
Epoch at which it is directed to take place : without evasion, 
neglect or delay, after the crops which may then be on 
the ground are harvested, particularly, as it respects the 
aged & infirm : seeing that a regular & permanent fund be 



138 WASHINGTON. 

established for their support so long as there are subjects 
requiring it : not trusting to the uncertain provision to 
be made by individuals. — And to my mulatto man, Wil- 
liam (calling himself Wm : Lee.) I give immediate free- 
dom, or if he should prefer it (on account of the acci- 
dents which have befallen him, and which have rendered 
him incapable of walking or of any active employment.) 
to remain-in the situation he now is, it shall be optional 
in him to do so : In either case however, I allow him an 
annuity of thirty dollars during his natural life, which shall 
be independent of the victuals and clothes he has been 
accustomed to receive, if he cho oses the last alternative : but 
in full with his freedom, if he prefers the first : & this I 
give him as a testimony of my sense of his attachment to 
me, and for his faithful services during the Revolutionary 
War. 

" Item. To the Trustees (Governors, or by whatsoever 
name they may be designated) of the Academy in the 
To'.vn of Alexandria, I give and bequeath, in Trust, four 
thousand dollars, or in other words, twenty of the shares 
which I hold in the Bank of Alexandria, towards the sup- 
port of a Free School, established at, and annexed to, the 
said Academy ; for the purpose of educating sucli orphan 
children, or the children of such other poor & indigent 
persons as are unable to accomplish it with their own 
means : and who in the Judgment of the Trustees of the 
said Seminary, are best entitled to the benefit of this dona- 
tion. The aforesaid twenty shares I give and bequeath in 
perpetuity : the dividends only of which are to be drawn 
for, and applied by the said Trustees, for the time being, for 
the uses above mentioned : the stock to remain entire and 
untouched : unless indications of a failure of the said 
Bank should be apparent, or discontinuance thereof should 
render a removal of this fund necessary : in either of these 
cases, the amount of the stock here devised, is to be vested 
in some other Bank or Public Institution, whereby the in^ 



WASHINGTON. 



139 



terest may with regularity & certainty be drawn and ap- 
plied as above. — And to prevent misconception, my mean- 
ing is, and is hereby declared to be, that these twenty shares 
are in lieu of, and not in addition to, the one thousand 
pounds given by a missive letter some years ago : in conse- 
quence whereof an annuity of fifty pounds has since been 
paid toward the support of this Institution. 

" Item : Whereas by a law of the Commonwealth of 
Virginia, enacted in the year 1785, the Legislature thereof 
was pleased (as an evidence of its approbation of the ser- 
vices I had rendered the public during the Revolution — 
& partly, I believe, in consideration of my having sug- 
gested the vast advantages which the community would 
derive from the extension of its Inland Navigation, under 
Legislative patronage,) to present me with one hundred 
shares of one hundred dollars each, in the incorporated, 
company established for the purpose of extending the 
navigation of James River from tide water to the moun- 
tains : and also with fifty shares of one hundred pounds 
sterling each, in the corporation of another company, like- 
wise established for the similar purpose of opening the 
navigation of the Potomac River from tide water to Fort 
Cumberland : the acceptance of which, although the offer 
was highly lionorable and grateful to my feelings, was re- 
fused, as inconsistent with a principle which I had adopted, 
and had never departed from — namely — not to receive pe- 
cuniary compensation for any services I could render my 
Country in its arduous struggle with Great Britain, for its 
Rights : and because I had evaded similar propositions 
from other States in the Union : adding to this refusal, 
however, an intimation that, if it should be the pleasure of 
the Legislature, to permit me to appropriate the said 
shares to public uses, I would receive them on those terms 
with due sensibility : and this, it having consented to, in 
flattering terms, as will appear by a subsequent Law and 
Sundry Resolutions, in the most ample and honorable man- 



I40 WASHINGTON. 

ner, I proceed after this recital, for the more correct under- 
standing of the case, to declare that as it has always been 
a source of serious regret with me, to see the youth of these 
United States sent to foreign countries for the purpose of 
education, often before their minds were formed, or they 
had imbibed any adequate ideas of the happiness of their 
own : contracting, too frequently, not only habits of dissipa- 
tion and extravagance, but principles unfriendly to Repub- 
lican Government & to the true and genuine liberties of 
mankind : which, thereafter, are rarely overcome. — For 
these reasons, it has been my ardent wish, to see a plan de- 
vised on a liberal scale which would have a tendency 
to spr^ systematic ides through all parts of this rising 
Empire, thereby to do away local attachments, and State 
prejudices, as far as the nature of things would, or indeed 
.ought to admit, from our National Councils. Looking 
anxiously forward to the accomplishment of so desirable an 
object as this is (in m)- estimation,) my mind has not been 
able to contemplate any plan more likely to effect the 
measure than the establishment of a University in a cen- 
tral part of the United States to which the youths of for- 
tune and talents from all parts thereof might be sent for 
the completion of their Education, in all the branches of 
polite literature in arts and sciences — in acquiring knowl- 
edge in the principles of politics & good government ; — 
and (as a matter of infinite importance in my judgment) 
by associating with each other, and forming friendships in 
Juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper 
degree from those local prejudices and habitual Jealousies 
which have just been mentioned : and which, when carried 
to excess, are never failing sources of disquietude to the 
public mind, & pregnant of mischievous ccuisequences to 
this Country — Under these impressions, so fully dilated. 

" Item. I give and bequeath in perpetuity, the fifty shares 
which I hold in the Potomac Company (under the afore- 
said Acts of the Legislature of Virginia.) towards the 



WASHINGTON. 141 

endowment of a University to be established within the 
limits of the District of Columbia, under the auspices of 
the general Government, if that Government should in- 
cline to extend a fostering hand towards it — and until 
such Seminary is established, and the funds arising on these 
shares shall be required for its support, my further will 
•& devise is that the profit accruing therefrom shall, 
whenever the dividends are made, be laid out in purchas- 
ing stock in the Bank of Columbia or some other Bank, at 
the discretion of my Executors : or by the Treasurer of the 
United States for the time being under the direction of 
Congress ; provided, that honourable body should patronize 
the measure, and the dividends proceeding from the 
purchase of such stock is t(j be vested in more stock, and 
so on, until a sum adequate to the accomplishment of the 
object is obtained, of which I have not the smallest doubt, 
before many years passes away : even if no aid or encouraged 
is given by Legislative authority, or from any other source. 

" Item. The hundred shares which I held in the James 
River Company, I have given, and now confirm in perpe- 
tuity to, and for the use and benefit of Liberty Hall 
Academy, in the County of Rockbridge, in the Common- 
wealth of Virginia. 

" Item. I release, exonerate and discharge the Estate of 
my deceased brother Samuel Washington, from the pay- 
ment of the money which is due to me for the land I sold 
to Philip Pendleton (lying' in the County of Berkeley,) 
who assigned the same to him. the said Samuel : who, by 
agreement was to pay me therefor : And whereas by some 
contract (the purport of which was never communicated 
to me.) between the said Sam.uel and his son, Tliorntcm 
Washington, the latter became possessed of the aforesaid 
land, without any conveyance having passed from nie, citlier 
to the said Pendleton, the saict Samuel, or the said Thorn- 
ton, and without any consideration having been made, by 
which neglect neither the legal nor equitable title has been 



1 42 WA SHING TON. 

alienated : it rests therefore with me to declare my inten- 
tions concerning the premises : and these are to give and 
bequeath the said land to whomsoever the said Thornton 
Washington (who is also dead,) devised the same : or to his 
heirs forever, if he died intestate : Exonerating the estate 
of the said Thornton, equally with that of the said Samuel 
from payment of the purchase-money: which, with interest,^ 
agreeably to the original contract with the said Pendleton, 
would amount to more than a thousand pounds. And 
whereas, two other sons of my said deceased brother Sam- 
uel, namely, George Steptoe Washington & Laurence 
Augustine Washington, were by the decease of those to 
whose care they were committed, were brought under my 
protection, and in conseqe have occasioned advances on 
my part for their education at College, and other schools, 
for their board, clothing & other incidental expenses, to 
the amount of near five thousand dollars, over and above 
the sum fvirnished by their Estate, wch sum may be incon- 
venient for them, or their father's Estate to refund. — I do 
for these reasons acquit them, and the said Estate from the 
payment thereof. — My intention being, that all accounts 
between them & me and their father's Estate and me, shall 
stand balanced. 

" Item. The balance due to me from the Estate of Bar- 
tholomew Dandridge, deceased, (my wife's brother,) and 
which amounted on the first day of October, 1795, to four 
hundred and twenty-five poiftids (as will appear by an 
account rendered by his deceased son John Dandridge, 
who was the acting Exr of his father's Will,) I release 
and acquit from the payment thereof. — And the negroes, 
(then thirty-three in number,) formerly belonging to the 
said Estate, who were taken in execution — sold and pur- 
chased in on my account in the year and ever since 
have remained in the possession, and to the use of Mary, 
widow of the #aid Bartholomew Dandridge, with their in- 
crease, it is my will and desire, shall continue and be in her 



WA SHING TON. 143 

possession, without paying liire, or making compensation 
for the same, for the time past or to come, during her nat- 
ural life : at the expiration of which, I direct that all of 
them who are forty years old & upwards, shall receive 
their freedom : all under that age and above sixteen, shali 
serv'e seven years and no longer, and all under sixteen 
years shall serve until they are twenty-five years of age, 
& then be free : and to avoid disputes respecting the 
ages of any of these negroes, they are to be taken to the 
Court of the County in which they reside, and the Judg- 
ment thereof, in this relation, shall be final, and a record 
thereof made : which may be adduced as evidence at any 
time thereafter, if disputes should arise concerning the 
same : And I further direct that the heirs of the said 
Bartholomew Dandridge shall equally, share the benefits, 
arising: from the services of the said negroes accordincr to> 
the tenor of this devise, upon the decease of their mother. 

" Item : If Charles Carter, who intermarried with my 
niece Betty Lewis, is not sufficiently secured in the title 
to the lots he had of me in the town of Fredericksburg, it 
is my Avill and desire that my Executors shall make such 
conveyances of them as the law may require to render it 
perfect. 

" Item. To my nephew William Augustine Washing- 
ton and his heirs (if he should conceive them objects 
worth prosecuting) and to his heirs, a lot in the town of 
Manchester, (opposite to Richmond.) No. 265, drawn on 
my sole account, and also the tenth of one or two, hundred 
acre lots, and two or three half acre lots in the city and 
vicinity of Richmond, drawn in partnership with nine 
others, all in the lottery of the deceased William Byrd are 
given — as is also a lot which I purchased of John Hood 
conveyed by William Willie and Samuel Gordon, Trustees,, 
of the said John Hood, numbered 139 in the town of 
Edinburgh, in the County of Prince George, State of Vir- 
ginia. 



144 WASHINGTON. 

" Item. To my nephew Bushrod Washington, I give and 
bequeath all the papers in my possession which relate to 
my civil and military administration of the affairs of this 
Country : I leave to him also sucli of my private papers 
as are worth preserving : and at the decease of my wife, and 
before if she is not inclined to detain them, I give and be- 
queath my Library of books, and pamphlets of every kind. 

" Item : Having sold lands which I possessed in the state 
■of Pennsylvania, and part of a tract held in equal right 
with George Clinton, late Governor of New York, in the 
State of New York ; my share of land and Interest in the 
Great Dismal Swamp, and a tract of land which I owned in 
the County of Gloucester, withholding the legal titles 
thereto, until the consideration money should be paid, — 
and having moreover leased and conditionally sold (as 
will appear by the tenor of the said leases,) all my lands 
upon the Great Kanhawa, — and the tract of land upon Dif- 
ficult Run in the County of Loudon, it being my will and 
direction, that whensoever the Contracts are fully, and res- 
pectively complied with, according to the spirit, true intent, 
and meaning thereof, on the part of the purchasers, their 
heirs, or assigns, that then, and in that case, conveyances are 
to be made, agreeably to the terms of tlic said Contracts & 
the money arising therefrom, when paid, to be vested in 
Bank Stock : the dividends whereof, as of that also wdi is 
already vested therein, to inure to my said wife during her 
life, but the Stock itself is to remain and be subject to the 
general distribution, hereafter directed. 

"Item. To the Earl of Buchan, I recommit, "the box 
made of the " Oak that sheltered the Great Sir William Wal- 
lace, after the battle of Falkirk," presented to me by his 
Lordship, in terms too flattering for me to repeat, — with a 
request " to pass it, on the event of my decease, to the man 
in my Country, who should appear to merit it best, upon 
the same conditions that have induced him to send it to 
me." Whether easy, or not, to select the man who might 



WA SUING TON. 145 

comport with his Lordship's opinion in this respect, is not 
for me to say : but conceiving that no disposition of this 
valuable curiosity can be more eligible than the re-com- 
mitment of it to his own cabinet, agreeably to the original 
design of the Goldsmith's Company of Edinburgh, who 
presented it to him, and at his request, consented that it 
should be transferred to me ; I do give and bequeath the 
same to his Lordship, and in case of his decease, to his heir, 
with my grateful thanks for the distinguished honor of 
presenting it to me : and more especially for the favourable 
sentiments with which he accompanied it. 

" Item. To my brother Charles Washington I give and 
bequeath the gold-headed cane left me by Docf Franklin 
in his will — I add nothing to it because of the ample 
provision I have made for his issue. To the acquaint- 
ances and friends of my Juvenile years, Lawrence Wash- 
ington & Robert Washington, of Chotanck, I give my 
other two gold-headed canes, having my arms engraved 
on them, and to each (as they will be useful where they 
live,) I leave one of the spy glasses which constituted 
part of my Equipage during the late war. To my com- 
patriot in arms and old and intimate friend Ucjcf Craik, 
I give my Bureau (or as the Cabinet Makers called it, 
Tambour Secretary,) and the circular chair, an append- 
age of my sturdy : — To Doctor David Stuart, I give my 
large shaving and dressing table, and my Telescope. To 
the Reverend, now Bryan, Lord Fairfax, I give a Bible in 
three large folio volumes, with notes, presented to me by 
the Right Reverend Thomas Wilson, Bishop of Sodor and 
Man. To General de la Fayette, I give a pair of finely 
wrought steel pistols, taken from the enemy in the Rev- 
olutionary war. To my sisters in law Hannah Washing- 
ton and Mildred Washington ; to my friends Eleanor 
Stuart, Hannah Washington, of Fairfield, and Elizabeth 
Washington of Hayfield, I give each a mourning ring of 
the value of one hundred dollars. These bequests are 
10 



146 WASHINGTON. 

not made for the intrinsic value of them, but as mementors 
of my esteem and regard. To Tobias Lear, I give the 
use of the farm which he now holds, in virtue of a lease 
from me to him, and his deceased wife (for and during their 
natural lives,) free from Rent during his life : at the expir- 
ation of which, it is to be disposed as is hereinafter directed. 
— To Sally B. Haynie (a distant relation of mine,) I 
give and bequeath three hundred dollars. — To Sarah 
Green daughter of the deceased Thomas Bishop, & to 
Ann Walker, daughter of Jn*^ Alton, also deceased, I give, 
each, one hundred dollars, in consideration of the attach- 
ment of their fathers to me, each of whom having lived 
nearly forty years in my family. To each of my 
nephews, William Augustine Washington, George Lewis, 
George Steptoe Washington, Bushrod Washington, & 
Samuel Washington, I give one of the swords or cutteaux of 
which I may die possessed : and they are to cJiuse in the 
order they are named. These swords are accompanied 
with an injunction not to unsheath them for the purpose 
of shedding blood, except it be for self defence, or in de- 
fence of their Country & its rights : and in the latter case, 
to keep them unsheathed, and prefer falling with them in 
their hands, to the relinquishment thereof. 

" And now 

" Having gone through these specific devises, with expla- 
nations for the more correct understanding of the meaning 
and design of them, I proceed tp the distribution of the 
more important parts of my Estate, in manner following. 

" First : To my nephew Bushrod Washington and his 
heirs (partly in consideration of an intimation to his de- 
ceased father, while we were Bachelors, & he had kindly 
undertaken to superintend my Estate during my military 
services in the former war between Great Britain and 
France, that if I should fall therein. Mount Vernon (then 
less extensive in domain than at present,) should become his 
property,) I give and bequeath all that part thereof which 



WASHINGTON. 14^ 

is comprehended within the following limits, viz : Be- 
ginning at the ford of Dogue run, near my mill, and ex- 
tending along the road, and bounded thereby, as it now 
goes, and ever has gone since my recollection of it, to the 
ford of Little Hunting Creek, at the Gum spring until it 
comes to a knowl, opposite to an old road which formerly 
passed through the lower field of muddy hole farm : at 
which, on the north side of the said road are three red or 
Spanish oaks marked as a corner, and a stone placed, 
thence by a line of trees to be marked, rectangular to the 
back line, or outer boundary of the tract between Thomson 
Mason & myself, — thence with that line easterly (now 
double ditching with a post & Rail fence thei^eon,) to the 
run of little hunting creek, thence with that run which is 
the boundary between the lands of the late Humphrey 
Peake and me, to the tide water of the said creek, thence 
by that water to Potomac River, thence with the River to 
the mouth of Dogue creek, — and thence with the said 
Dogue creek, to the place of beginning at the aforesaid 
ford ; containing vipwards of four thousand acres, be the 
same more or less — together with the Mansion house, and 
all other buildings, and improve'" thereon. 

" Second. In consideration of the consanguinity between 
them and my wife, being as nearly related to her as to my- 
self, as on account of the affection I had for, and the obli- 
gation I was under to, their father when living, who from 
his youth had attached himself to my person, and followed 
my fortunes through the vicissitudes of the late Revolu- 
tion — afterwards devoting his time to the superintendence 
of my private concerns for many years, whilst my public 
employments rendered it impracticable for me to do it 
myself, thereby affording me essential services, and always 
performing them in a manner the most filial and respect- 
ful : for these reasons, I say, I give and bequeath to George 
Fayette Washington & Laurence Augustine Washington 
and their heirs, my estate east of little Hunting creek, lying 



148 WASHINGTON. 

on the river Potomac : including the farm of 360 acres, 
leased to Tobias Lear as noticed before — and containing in 
the whole, by Deeds, two thousand and seventy seven acres 
— be it more or less, which said Estate it is my will and 
desire should be equitably & advantageously divided be- 
tween them, according to quantity, quality and other cir- 
cumstances when the youngest shall have arrived at the 
age of twenty one years, by three judicious and disinter- 
ested men ; — one to be chosen by each of the brothers, and 
the third by these two. In the mean time if the termination 
of my wife's interest therein should have ceased, the profits 
arising therefrom are to be applied, for their joint uses and 
benefit : — 

" Third. And whereas it has always been my intention, 
since my expectation of having issue has ceased, to con- 
sider the grandchildren of my wife in the same light as I 
do my own relations, and to act a friendly part by them ; 
more especially by the two whom we have reared from 
their earliest infancy — namely — Eleanor Parke Custis and 
George Washington Parke Custis. And whereas the former 
of these hath lately intermarried with Lawrence Lewis, a 
son of my deceased sister Betty Lewis, by which union the 
inducement to provide for them both has been increased : 
Wherefore, I give and bequeath to the said Lawrence Lewis 
and Eleanor Parke Lewis, his wife, and their heirs, the 
residue of my Mount Vernon Estate, not already devised 
to my nephew Bushrod Washington, comprehended within 
the following description, viz : All the land north of the 
road leading from the ford of Dogue run to the Gum 
springs as described in the devise of the other part of the 
tract, to Bushrod Washington, until it comes to the stone 
and three red or Spanish oaks on the knowl, — thence with 
the rectangular line to the back line (between Mr. Mason 
& me,) thence with that line westerly, along the new 
double ditch to Dogue run, by the tumbling dam of my 



WA SHING TON. 1 49 

mill, thence with the said run to the ford aforemen- 
tioned : to which I add all the land I possess west of the 
said Dogue run, and Dogue Cr^ bounded Easterly and 
Southerly thereby : together with the Mill, Distillery & 
all other houses and improvements on the premises, mak- 
ing together about two thousand acres, be it more or 
less. 

" Fourth. Actuated by the principle already mentioned, 
I give and bequeath to George Washington Parke Custis, 
the Grandson of my wife, and my ward, and to his heirs, 
the tract I hold on four mile run in the vicinity of Alex- 
andria, containing one thousand Two hundred acres, more 
or less : and my entire square, number twenty one, in the 
City of Washington. 

" Fifth : All the rest and residue of my Estate, real and 
personal — not disposed of in manner aforesaid — In what- 
soever consisting — wheresoever lying — and whensoever 
found — a Schedule of which, as far as is recollected, with a 
reasonable estimate of its value, is hereunto annexed — I 
desire may be sold by my Executors at such times — in such 
manner — and on such credits (if an equal, valid, and sat- 
isfactory distribution of the specific property cannot be 
made without,) as, in their judgment shall be most con- 
ducive to the interest of the parties concerned : and the 
monies arising therefrom to be divided into twenty three 
equal parts, and applied as follows, viz : 

To William Augustine Washington, Elizabeth Spots- 
wood, Jane Thornton and the heirs of Ann Ashton, son 
and daughters of my deceased brother, Augustine Wash- 
ington, I give and bequeath four parts ; that is, one part to 
each of them. — To Fielding Lewis, George Lewis, Robert 
Lewis, Howell Lewis and Betty Carter, sons and daughter 
of my deceased sister Betty Lewis, I give and bequeath, 
five other parts, one to each of them. To George Steptoe 
Washington, Lawrence Augustine Washington, Harriot 



I50 WA SHING TON. 

Parks, and the heirs of Thornton Washington, sons and 
•daughter of my deceased brother, Samuel Washington, 
I give and bequeath other four parts, one part to each of 
them. To Corbin Washington, and the heirs of Jane 
Washington, son and daughter of my deceased brother 
John Augustine Washington I give and bequeath two 
parts : one part to each of them. 

To Samuel Washington, Frances Ball ?nd Mildred Ham- 
mond, son and daughters of my brother Charles Wash- 
ington, I give and bequeath three parts : one part to each 
of them : — And to George Fayette Washington, Charles 
Augustine Washington and Maria Washington, sons and 
daughter of my deceased nephew, George Augustine Wash- 
ington, I give one other part : that is, to each a third of 
that part. To Elizabeth Parke Law, Martha Parke Peter, 
and Eleanor Parke Lewis, I give and bequeath three other 
parts, that is, a part to each of them. 

And to my nephews Bushrod Washington and Lawrence 
Lewis, and to my ward, the Grandson of my wife, I give 
and bequeath one other part : — that is, a third thereof to 
each of them. — And if it should so happen, that any of the 
persons whose names are here enumerated (unknown to 
Tne,) should now be deceased, or should die before me, 
that in either of these cases, the heirs of such deceased 
person shall, notwithstanding, derive all the benefit of the 
bequests : in the same manner as if he, or she, was actually 
living at the time. 

And by way of advice, I recommend it to my Executors 
not to be precipitate in disposing of the landed property 
^therein directed to be sold,) if from temporary causes 
the sale thereof should be dull : experience having fully 
evinced, that the price of land (especially above the Falls 
•of the Rivers and on the western waters,) have been pro- 
gressively rising, and cannot be long checked in its in- 
creasing value. And 1 particularly recommend it to such 



WASHING TON. 15 1 

■of the Legatees (under this clause of my will,) as can 
make it convenient, to take each a share of my stock in 
the Potomac Company in preference to the amount of 
what it might sell for : being thoroughly convinced my- 
self, that no uses to which the money can be applied 
will be so productive as the Tolls arising from this navi- 
gation when in full operation (and this from the nature 
of things it must be 'ere long,) & more especially if that 
of the Shenandoah is added thereto. 

"The family vault at Mount Vernon requiring repairs, 
and being improperly situated besides, I desire that a new 
one of brick, and upon a larger scale, may be built, at the 
foot of what is commonly called the Vineyard enclosure, 
on the ground which is marked out. — In which my remains, 
with those of my deceased relatives (now in the old vault,) 
.and such others of my family as may chuse to be en- 
tombed there, may be deposited. And it is my express 
desire that- my corpse may be interred in a private manner, 
without parade or funeral oration. 

" Lastly, I constitute and appoint my dearly beloved 
wife Martha Washington, my nephews, William Augustine 
Washington, Bushrod Washington, George Steptoe Wash- 
ington, Saml Washington & Lawrence Lewis and my ward 
Geo. Washington Parke Custis, (when he shall have arrived 
at the age twenty years,) Executrix and Executors, of this 
will and testament. 

" In the construction of which it will readily be per- 
ceived that no professional character has been consulted 
or has had any agency in the draught and that, although 
it has occupied many of my leisure hours to digest and to 
through it into its present form, it may, notwithstanding, 
appear crude & incorrect. — But having endeavored to 
be plain and explicit, in all the devises — even at the ex- 
pence of prolixity, perhaps of tautology, I hope, and 
•trust, that no disputes will arise concerning them : but if, 



T^2 



WASHINGTON. 



contrary to expectation, the case should be otherwise^ 
from the want of legal expression, or the usual technical 
terms, — or because too much or too little has been* said on 
any of the devises to be consonant with law, my will and 
direction expressly is, that all disputes (if unhappily any 
should arise,) shall be decided by three impartial and intel- 
ligent men, known for their probity and good understand- 
ing : two to be chosen by the disputants, each having the 
choice of one — and the third by those two. — Which three 
men thus chosen, shall, unfettered by law, or legal con- 
structions, declare their sense of the testator's intention : 
and such decision is, to all intents and purposes to be as 
binding on the parties as if it had been ^iven in the. 
Supreme Court of the United States. 

" In witness of all, and of each of tlie things herein con- 
tained I have set my hand and seal this ninth day of July 
in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety* — &. 
of the Independence of the United States the twenty 
fourth. 



[sea L.J 




* It appears the testator omitted the word " nine." 



WASHINGTON. 153 



Schedule of property comprehended in the foregoing will : which 
is directed to be sold, and some of it, conditionally is sold : 
with descriptive and explanatory notes relative thereto 



In Virginia. 

Acres. Price. Dollars. 



Loudoun County 
Difficult run 



Loudoun & Fauquier 
Ashby's Bent . 
Chattins run . 

Berkeley 

So Fork of Bullskin 
Head of Evan's Mill 
In Wormely's line . 



Frederick 

Bought from Mercer 

Hampshire 

On Potmk. river above B. 

Gloucester 

On North River 

Nansemond, 

Near Suffolk ^of 1119 ) 
Acres . . ) 

Great Dismal Swamp 

My dividend thereof 

Ohio River 

Round Bottom 
Little Kenhawa 



300 




$6,666 {a) 


2,481 
885 


$8 


24,810 ) 
7,080 f ^'-^ 


1,600 






453 
183 






2,236 


$20 


$44,720 {c) 


571 


20 


11,420 {d.) 


240 


15 


3,600 {e) 


400 


abt 


3,600 (/.) 


373 


$8 


2,984 {g) 




abt 


20,000 {K) 


587 
2,314 







2,901 $124,880 



IS4 



WASHINGTON. 



Schedule — Continued. 









Dollars. 




Amount brot. over . 


2,901 




$124,880 




i6 miles lower down 


2,448 








Opposite big bent . 


4,395 


Dol. 
10 






Great Kenhawa 


9,744 


97,440 


{i) 


Near the mouth west 


10,990 








East side above 


• 7,276 








Mouth of Cole river 


2,000 








Opposite thereto . 


2,950 








Burning Spring 


125 




200,000 




Maryland 


23,341 


{k) 


Charles County- 


600 


6 


3,600 


(0 


Montgomery do . 


519 


12 


6,228 


{m) 


Pennsylvania 










Great Meadows 


234 


6 


1,404 


{n) 


New York 










Mohawk River abt 


, 1,000 


6 


6,000 


(0.) 


North Western Territory 










On little Miami 


. 839 








Ditto 


. 977 








Ditto 


^,235 


5 


15,251 




Kentucky 


3,051 


(/.) 


Rough Creek 


3,000 








Ditto adjoins- 


. 2,000 


$2 


10,000 






5,000 


(^•) 


Lots, viz : City of Washingi 


ton. 








Two near the capitol, 


sqr. 634 








cost $963, and with Bi 


iild's. 




15,000 


{r) 



Carried over. 



479,803 



WASHINGTON. 155 

Schedule — Continued. 

Dollars. 
Amt. brought over. . . . $479,803 
Lots. City of Washington. 

No. 5, 12, 13 & 14, the 3 last, water lots 
on the Eastern Branch, in sqr. 667, 
containing together 34,438 sqr. ft. at 
12 cts 4,132 {s) 

Alexandria. 

Corner of Pitt & Prince streets, half 
an acre — laid out into buildings, 3 
or 4 of whi'^ii are let on ground Rent 
at $30 pr. foot 4,000 {t) 

Winchester. 

A lot in the town of half an acre, & 
another in the commons of about 6 
acres, supposed. ..... 400 («.) 

Bath, or Warm Springs. 

Two well situated & had buildings to 

the amount of $150 800 (z;.) 



Stock. 








United States, 6 P c^- 


• 


3,746 




Do deferred 1873 








3 P cts. 2946, 


• 


2500 


6,246 {x) 


Potomack Company. 








24 shares, cost ea. ^100 star. 


• 


• • 


20,666 (jv.) 


James River Company. 








5 shares, each cost $100. 


• 


• • 


500 {z) 


Bank of Columbia. 








170 shares — $40 each. 


• 


6,800 




Bank of Alexandria — besides 20 


to 




(6^) 


the free school 5. 


• 


1,000 





$514,347 



156 WASHINGTON. 

Schedule — Continued. 
Amt. brought over. . . . 514,347 

Stock — living — viz : 

I Covering horse, 5 Co. Horses, 4 riding 
do — six brood mares — 20 working 
horses & mares — 2 covering jacks — 
& three young ones — 10 she asses, 
42 working mules, 15 younger ones — 
329 head of horned cattle, 640 head of 
sheep, & a large stock of hogs — the 
precise number unknown. 
My manager has estimated this live 
stock at $7,000 but I shall set it down 
in order to make said sum at. ^Sj^SJ 



Aggregate Amt. . . . $530,000 

NOTES. 

{a?) This tract for the size of it is valuable : more for its 
situation — than the quality of its soil, though that is good 
for farming ; with a considerable portion of gr"^ that 
might, very easily, be improved into meadow. It lies on 
the Great road from the city of Washington, Alexandria 
& Georgetown to Leesburgh & Winchester, at Difficult 
bridge, nineteen miles from Alexandria, less from Wash- 
ington and Georgetown, and not more than three from 
Matildaville, at the Great Falls of Potomac. There is a 
valuable seat on the premises, and the whole is condition- 
ally sold, for the sum annexed in the schedule. 

{b^ What the selling prices of lands in the vicinity of 
these two tracts are, I know not ; but compared with those 
above the ridge, and others below them, the value annexed 
will appear moderate, a less one would not obtain them 
from me. 

{c) The surrounding land, not superior in soil, situation 



WASHINGTON. 157 

or properties of any sort, sell currently at from twenty to 
thirty dollars an acre, the lowest price is affixed to these. 

{d.) The observations made in the last note applies equally 
to this tract tract — being in the vicinity of them, and of sim- 
ilar quality, although it lies in another County. 

{e) This tract, though small, is extremely valuable : It 
lies on Potomac River about 12 miles above the town of 
Bath (or Warm Springs,) and is in the shape of a horse- 
shoe — the river running almost around it. Two hvindred 
acres of it is rich low grounds : with a great abundance of 
the largest and finest walnut trees : which, with the produce 
of the soil, might, (by means of the improved navigation of 
the Potomac,) be brought to a shipping port with more 
■ease, and at a smaller expence, than that which is trans- 
ported 30 miles only by land. 

(/.) This tract of second rate Gloucester low grounds. 
It has no improvements thereon, but lies on navigable 
water, abounding in fish and oysters. It was received in 
payment of a debt (carrying interest), and valued in the 
year 1789 by an impartial gentleman at ^800. N. B. It 
has lately been sold and there is due thereon, a balance 
€qual to what is annexed the Scedule. 

(^.) These 373 acres are the third part of undivided pur- 
chases made by the deceased Fielding Lewis, Thomas Wal- 
ker and myself : on full conviction that they would become 
valuable. The land lies on the road from Suffolk to Nor- 
folk — touches (if I am not mistaken) some part of the 
navigable water of Nansemond River — borders on and 
comprehends part of the Rich Dismal Swamp ; is capable 
of great improvement : and from its situation must become 
extremely valuable. 

(^.) This is an undivided interest whch I held in the Great 
Dismal Swamp Company, containing about 4,000 acres, 
with my part of the Plantation & the Stock thereon, be- 
longing to the Company in the said swamp. 

(/) These several tracts of land are of the first quality on 



158 WASHINGTON. 

the Ohio River, in the parts where they are situated : 
being almost if not altogether River bottoms. The small- 
est of these tracts is actually sold at ten dollars an acre, 
but the consideration therefor, not received — the rest are 
equally valuable and will sell as high — especially that 
which lies just below the Little Kenhawa and is opposite 
to a thick settlement on the west side the River. The four 
tracts have an aggregate breadth upon the river of sixteen 
miles and is bounded thereby that distance. 

(/^.) These tracts are situated on the Great Kenhawa 
river, and the first four are bounded thereby for more than 
forty miles. It is acknowledged by all who have seen 
them (and of the tract containing 10990 acres which I have 
been on myself, I can assert,) that there is no richer or 
more valuable land in all that Region — they are condition- 
ally sold, for the sum mentioned in the Schedule — that is. 
$200,000. & if the terms of that Sale are not complied 
with they will command considerably more. The tract of 
which the 125 acres is a moiety, was taken op by General 
Andrew Lewis and myself, for & on account of a bitumin- 
ous spring which it contains, of so inflammable a nature 
as to burn as freely as spirits, and is as nearly difficult to^ 
extinguish. 

(/.) I am but little acquainted with this land, although I 
have once been on it. — It was received (many years since,) 
in discharge of a debt due to me from Daniel Jenifer 
Adams to the value annexed thereto — & must be worth 
more. It is very level, lies near the River Potomac. 

(;«.) This tract lies about 30 miles above the City of 
Washington, not far from Kittoctan. It is good farming 
land, and by those who are well acquainted with it I am 
informed that it would sell at twelve or $15 p. acre. 

(«.) This land is valuable on account of its local situa- 
tion, & other properties. It affords an exceeding good 
stand on Braddock's road from Fort Cumberland to Pitts- 
burgh, and besides a fertile soil, possesses a large quantity 



WASHIXGTON. 



IS9 



of natural meadow, fit ioc the scythe. It is distinguished 
by the appellation of the Great Meadows, where the first 
action with the French in the year 1754, was fought. 

(0) This is the moiety of about 2000 acres, which remains 
unsold of 6071 acres, on the Mohawk River (Montgomery 
County) in a patent granted to Daniel Coxe, in the Town- 
ship of Coxeborough, & Carolaca, as will appear by deed 
from Marinus Willett & wife to Geo. Clinton (late Gov- 
ernor of New York,) and myself. The latter sales have 
been at six dollars an acre and what remains unsold will 
fetch that or more. 

(/.) The quality of these lands and their situation may 
be known by the Surveyor's certificates — which are filed 
along with the patents. They lie in the vicinity of Cin- 
cinnati — one tract near the mouth of the little Miami— 
another seven, and the third ten miles up the same. I have- 
been informed that they will readily command mdre than 
they are estimated at. 

(^.) For the description of these tracts in detail, see Gen- 
eral Spotswood's letters filed with the other papers relat- 
ing to them. Besides the general good quality of the 
land, there is a valuable Bank of Iron ore thereon — which 
when the settlement becomes more populous (and settlers 
are moving that way very fast,) will be found* very valu- 
able, as the rough Creek, a branch of Green River affords 
ample water for Furnices and Forges. 

Lots, viz. : 

CITY OF WASHINGTON. 

(r.) The two lots near the capitol, in square 634, cost me 
^963, only ; but in this price I was favoured, on condition 
that I should build two brick houses three story high each. 
Witliout this reduction the selling prices of those lots 
would have cost me about $1350. These lots, with the 



i6o WASHINGTON. 

Buildings thereon, when completed will stand me in 
^15000 at least. 

(i^.) Lots No. 5, 12, 13 & 14, on the Eastern branch, are 
advantageously situated on the water, & although many 
lots much less convenient have sold a great deal higher, 
I will rate these at 12 cts. the square foot only. 

ALEXANDRIA. 

(/) For this lot, though vinimproved, I have refused ^3500. 
It has since been laid off into proper sized lots for building 
on, three or four of which are let on ground rent, forever — 
at three dollars a foot on the street — and this price is asked 
for both fronts on Pitt & Princes street. 

WINCHESTER. 

{u!) As neither the lot in the town or common have any 
improvements on them, it is not easy to fix a price, but as 
both are well situated, it is presumed the price annexed to 
them in the schedule is a reasonable value. 

BATH. 

(z£/.) The lots in Bath (two adjoining) cost me, to the best 
of my recollection, between fifty and sixty pounds, 20 years 
ago, and the buildings thereon ^150 more. Whether prop- 
erty there has increased or decreased in its value, and in 
v^rhat condition the houses are, I am ignorant — but suppose 
they are not valued too high. 

(jc.) These are the sums which are actually funded, — and 
though no more in the aggregate than $7,566, stand me in 
at least ten thousand pounds Virginia money, being the 
amount of bonded and other debts due to me, and dis- 
charged during the war, when money had depreciated in 
that rate and was so settled by public authority. 

\y^ The value annexed to these shares is what they 
actually cost me and is the price afl&xed by law, & although 



WASHINGTON. i6i 

the present settling price is under par ; my advice to the 
legatees (for whose benefit they are intended, especially 
those who can afford to lie ocit of the money,) is that each 
should take and hold one ; there being a moral certainty 
of great & increasing profit arising from them in the course 
of a few years. 

{z.) It is supposed that the shares in the James River 
Company must also be productive : but of this I can give 
no decided opinion for want of more accurate informa- 
tion. 

(cT'.) These are the nominal prices of the shares in the 
Banks of Alexandria and Columbia : the selling prices 
vary according to circumstances. But as the stock usually 
divide from eight to ten per cent per annum, they must be 
worth the former at least — so long as the Banks are con- 
ceived to be secure, although circumstances may sometimes 
below it. The value of the live stcjck depends more upon 
the quality than quantity of the different species of it, & 
this again upon the demand and judgment, or fancy of 
purchasers. 

GO WASHINGTON. 

Mount Vernon 

9th : July 1799. 

At a Court held for the County of Fairfax, the 20th, 
January 1800. This last will and testament of Geo. 
Washington, deceased, late President of the United States 
of America, was presented in Court by Geo. Steptoe Wash- 
ington, Samuel Washington and Lawrence Lewis, three of 
the Executors therein named, who made oath thereto, and 
the same being proved by the oath of Charles Little, Charles 
Simms and Ludwell Lee, to be in the true hand writing of 
the said Testator, as also the schedule thereto annexed, & 
the said will being sealed and signed by him, is on motion 
ordered to be recorded — And the srtid Executors having 
given security and performed what the Laws require a 
11 



i62 WASHINGTON. 

certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof 
in due form. 

Teste : 

G. Deneale, C. Fx. 
Examined by 

G. Deneale. 

Virginia, to wit : 

I, F. D. Richardson, Clerk of the County Court of Fair- 
fax County, Virginia, do hereby certify, that the foregoing 
is a full, true and complete copy of the last will & testa- 
ment of Genl- Go Washington, as the same is now on 
record among the will records of my said Court. Given 

under my hand, and the seal of said 
Court, this 22d. day of October A. D. 
[seal.] 1878, & in the 103rd. year of the Com- 

monwealth of Virginia. 

F. D. RICHARDSON, Clerk. 

Virginia, to wit : 

I, James Sangster, Judge of the County Court of Fairfax 
County, in the State aforesaid, do certify, that F. D. Rich- 
ardson, whose genuine signature appears to the foregoing 
certificate, is Clerk of the said Court and that all his 
official acts as such are entitled to full faith and credit. 

Given under my hand, this 24 day of Oct. 1878. 

JAMES SANGSTER, Judge. 




WASIirilTGTOKr MONUMEMTo 



WASHINGTON. 163 



lHasljington, 

The Defender of his Countr}- ; the Founder of Liberty ; 

The Friend of Man. 

History and Tradition are explored in vain 

For a Parallel to his Character. 

In the annals of modern Greatness 

He stands alone, 

And the noblest Names of Antiquity 

Lose their Lustre in his Presence. 

Born the Benefactor of Mankind, 

He united all the Qualities necessary 

To an illustrious Career. 

Nature made him Great, 

He made himself Virtuous. 

Called by his Countr}' to the Defense of her Liberties, 

He triumphantly vindicated the Rights of Humanity, 

And on the Pillars of National Independence 

Laid the Foundations of a Great Republic. 

Twice invested with Supreme Magistracy 

By the Unanimous Voice of a Free People, 

He surpassed in the Cabinet 

The Glories of the Field. 

And, voluntarily resigning the Sceptre and the Sword, 

Retired to the Shades of Private Life, 

A spectacle so new and so sublime 

Was contemplated with the profoundest Admiration ; 

And the Name of Washington, 

Adding new Lustre to Humanity, 

Resounded to the remotest Regions of the Earth. 

Magnanimous in Youth, 

Glorious through Life, 

Great in Death. 

His highest Ambition, the Happiness of Mankind, 

His noblest Victory the Conquest of himself. 

Bequeathing to Posterity the Inheritance of his Fame, 

And building his Monument in the Hearts of his Countrymen, 

He lived the Ornament of the Eighteenth Century, 

He died regretted by a Mourning World. 



i64 WASHINGTON. 

23 Betty Washington, second child of Augustine (by sec- 
ond wife), was born in Stafford county, Virginia, 20 June, 

1733- 

She married Colonel Fielding Lewis. She was his second 

wife. A great-grandson now (1876) lives on Hoboken 

Heights, at Stevens' Castle — Colonel Edward Parke Custis 

Lewis, 314 Hudson Street, Hoboken. Her children were ■ 

24 Fielding Lewis, born in Stafford county, Virginia, 

about 1755. 
24 Betty Lewis, born in Stafford county, Virginia, 

about 1758. 
24 George Fielding Lewis, born in Stafford county, 

Virginia, about 1760. 
24 Robert Lewis^ born in Stafford county, Virgina, 

about 1765. 
24 Howell Lewis, born in Stafford county, Virginia, 

Dec. 12, 1770. 
24 Laurence Lewis, born in Stafford county, Virginia, 
about 1775. 
" Betty Lewis had a number of children, many of whom 
died young, but five sons and a daughter are yet living." — 
.General Washington s Letter, May 2, 1752. 

23 Mildred Washington, sixth child of Augustine (by 
second wife), was born 21 June, 1739. Died infant, 28 
Oct., 1740. 

23 Colonel Samuel Washington, third child of Augustine 
(by second wife), was born in Stafford county, Virginia, 
16 Nov., 1734. 

He was Colonel in the American Army. He died at Hare- 
wood, in Berkeley county, Virginia, in 1781. He married 
first, Jane, daughter of Colonel John Champe. No chil- 
dren. Married second, Mildred, daughter of Colonel John 
Thornton. He had issue : 



y 



iBy 



^^sms^®^®^ -Hfis^ni^-r, 




C. H BalT 

THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT, RICHMOND. VA , 
THOMAS CHAWrOBD. SCULPTOR 



Frcm H Itiotojjiapb JfeUrnwrng made ibr Trvm^s Washjiigtciii, by .1. W. Elhiliuger. JJ.I, 



I WASHINGTON. 165 

24 Thornton Washington, born in Stafford county, 

Virginia, about 1760. 
24 Tristam Washington, born in Stafford county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1763. 
Married third, Lucy, daughter of Nathaniel Chapman. 
No children. Married fourth, Anne, daughter of Colonel 
William Steptoe (widow of Willoughby Allerton). Chil- 
dren by fourth wife : 

24 Frederick or Ferdinand Washington, born at 

Harewood, Berkeley county, Virginia, 1773. 
24 George Steptoe Washington, born in Harewood, 

Berkeley county, Virginia, 1775. 
24 Laurence Augustine Washington, born in Hare- 
wood, Berkeley county, Virginia, 1777. 
24 Harrio 1 Parks Washington, born in Harewood, 
Berkeley county, Virginia, 1780. 
His fifth wife was Widow Perrin. 

"Samuel Washington, son of Augustine and Mary, was 
five times married. First, to Jaiie, daughter of C()h)nel 
John Champe. Second, to Mildred, daughter of Cohjnel 
John Thornton. Third, to Lucy, daughter of Nathaniel 
Chapman. Fourth, to Anne, daughter of Colonel William 
Steptoe, and widow of Willoughby Allerton. Fifth, to 
Widow Perrin. Samuel by his second wife, Mildred, had 
issue one son, Thornton, who was twice married, and left 
three sons. By his fourth wife, Anne, he had three sons, 
Ferdinand, George Steptoe, and Laurence Augustine, and a 
daughter, Harriet. Ferdinand was married, but died soon 
after, leaving no issue. The other two sons and daugliter 
are living (1792), and single. Samuel had children by his 
other wives, but they all died in their infancy. 

''Samuel departed this life, A. D. 1781, at Harewood, in 
the county of Berkeley, where he was buried." — General 
Was/iiiigioii's Letter, May 2, 1792. 

Colonel Samuel Washington built the Harewood House, 
near Charlestown, Jefferson county, West Virginia, about 



1 66 WASHINGTON. 

A. D. 1752, and lived there until his death in 1781. He 
often entertained his distinguished brother, General George 
"Washington, beneatli his hospitable roof 

EXTRACT FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON'S WILL. 

" I release, exonerate and discharge the Estate of my 
deceased brother Samuel Washington, from the pay- 
ment of the money which is due to me for the land I sold 
to Philip Pendleton (lying in the County of Berkeley,) 
who assigned the same to him, the said Samuel : who, by 
agreement was to pay me therefor : And whereas by some 
contract (the purport of which was never communicated 
to me,) between the said Samuel and his son, Tiiornton 
Washington, the latter became possessed of the aforesaid 
land, without any conveyance having passed from me, either 
to the said Pendleton, the said Samuel, or the said Thorn- 
ton, and without any consideration having been made, by 
which neglect neither the legal nor equitable title has been 
alienated : it rests therefore with me to declare my inten- 
tions concerning the premises : and these are to give and 
bequeath the said land to whomsoever the said Thornton 
Washington (wha is also dead,) devised the same : or to his 
heirs forever, if he died intestate : Exonerating the estate 
of the said Thornton, equally with that of the said Samuel 
from payment of the purchase-money: which, with interest, 
agreeably to the original contract with the said Pendleton, 
would amount to more than a thousand pounds. And 
whereas, two other sons of my said deceased brother Sam- 
uel, namely, George Steptoe Washington & Laurence 
Augustine Washington, were by the decease of those to 
whose care they were committed, were brought under my 
protection, and in conseqe have occasioned advances on 
my part for their education at College, and other schools, 
for their board, clothing & other incidental expenses, to 
the amount of near live thousand dollars, over and above 
the sum furnished by their Estate, wch sum may be incon- 



WASHINGTON. 167 

venient for them, or their father's Estate to refund.— I do 
for these reasons acquit them, and the said Estate from the 
payment thereof. — My intention being, that all accounts 
between them & me and their father's Estate and me, shall 
stand balanced." 



-23 John Augustine Washington, fourth child of Augustine 
(by second wife), was born in Stafford county, Virginia, 
13 Jan., 1736. In 1785 he was chosen one of the Vestry- 
men of Cople Parish, in Westmoreland. Married Hannah, 
daughter of Col. John Bushrod, of Westmoreland county. 
Had several children who died young, and left two sons 
^nd two daughters : 

24 Jane WashingtOxNt, born in Stafford county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1758. 
24 Mildred Washington, born in Stafford county, 

Virginia, about 1760. 
24 Bushrod Washington, born in Stafford county, 

Virginia, 5 June, 1762. 
24 CoRBiN Washington, born at Bushfield, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1765. 
24 William Augustine Washington, born in Stafford 
county, Virginia, about 1767. 
To Hannah, wife of John A. Washington, was left by 
General Washington, in his will, a mourning ring of the 
value of one hundred dollars. 

"John Augustine Washington died in Feb., 1787, at his 
estate on Nomony, in Westmoreland county, and was 
there buried." — General Washington's Letter. 

22 Col. Charles Washington, fifth child of Augustine 
(by second wife), was torn in Stafford county, Virginia, 
about 1740. He was Colonel in the American Army. He 
married, Mildred, daughter of Colonel Francis Thorn- 
ton, of Spottswood county, Virginia. 'He had issue : 



i68 WASHINGTON. 

\.^ 
24 George Augustine Washington, born in Stafford 

county, Virginia, about 1763. / 

24 Samuel Washington, born in Stafford county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1765. 
24 Frances Washington, born in Stafford county,. 

Virginia, about 1772. Married Col. Burgess Ball. 
24 Mildred Washington, born in -Stafford county^ 
Virginia, about 1777. Married Hammond. 
He laid out the town that now bears his name " Charles- 
town," in Jefferson county. West Virginia. His place of 
residence was called " Happy Retreat." 

extracts from general Washington's will. 

Item. " To my brother, Charles Washington, I give and 
bequeath the Gold-headed cane, left me by Dr. Franklin,. 
in his will. I add nothing to it because of the ample pro- 
vision I have made for his issue." 

Item. " To Samuel Washington. Frances Ball and Mil- 
dred Hammond, son and daughters of my brother Charles 
Washington, I give and bequeath three parts of the residue 
of my estate, one part to each of them." 

To Mildred, wife of Charles Washington, was left a 
mourning ring, of the value of one hundred dollars. 

24 Warner Washington, first of Warner, first of John, 
first of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, was born in Gloucester county, Virginia, April 
15, 1751. Died in Llewellyn, Clark county, Virginia. 
After his father's second marriage he removed with him 
to Fairfield, Clark county, Virginia, thence to Clifton, 
thence to Audley, thence to Llewellyn, where he died. 

Married, first, in Gloucester county, 18 Oct., 1770, to 
Mary, daughter of Francis (and Frances Perrin) Whiting, 
of Gloucester county, Virginia. She died at Clifton, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1794. " Many sons and daughters." — George 
Washington's Letter, 2 May, 1792. He had issue : 



WASHINGTON. 169 

25 Warner Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 
Dec. 7, 1771, 

25 John Whiting Washington, born in Kentucky, 

Oct. 4, 1773. 
25 Frances Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 

April 30, 1775. 
25 Emily Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, May 

8, 1778. 
25 Sydney Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 

May 31, 1780. Died young. 
25 Henry Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 

Mar. 8, 1782. 
25 Francis Whiting Washington, born at Clifton, 

Virginia, June 18, 1784. 
25 Beverly Washington, born at Clifton, Vii-ginia, 

Aug. 25, 1786. 
25 Perrin Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 

Feb. 7, 1790. 
Married, second, at Elmington, Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, June 13, 1795, to Sarah Warner Rootes, of . 

Children : 

25 Reade Washington, born at Audley, Virginia, 

May 18, 1796. 
25 Thacher Washington, born at Audley, Virginia, 

Dec. 5, 1797. Died infant. 
25 Elizabeth Warner Washington, born at Audley, 

Virginia, Sept. 28, 1800. 
25 Fairfax Washington, born at Audley, Virginia, 

Mar. 30, 1802. 
25 William Herbert Washington, born at Audley, 

Virginia, May 30, 1803. 
25 Alexander Hamilton Washington, born at Aud- 
ley, Virginia, Mar 5, 1805. 
25 Mary Herbert Washington, born at Audley, Vir- 
ginia, Sept. 25, 1808. 



I70 WASHINGTON. 

2/^ Mildred Washington, second child of Warner, was 
born at Fairfield, Virginia, A. D. 1765. Removed to 
Woodbury, now (1877) Mansfield, Virginia. Died there 
about 1808. Married at Fairfield, b)' Rev. Alexander Bel- 
maine, about 1791, to Albion Throckmorton, of Glouces- 
ter county, Virginia. He died at Woodbury. Children : 
25 Warner Washington Throckmorton, born at 
Woodbury, Virginia, Feb., 1792. Died in Jefferson 
county, Virginia, in 1855. 
25 Hannah Fairfax Throckmorton, born at Wood- 
bury, Virginia, in 1793. Died in Memphis, Tennes- 
see, in 1858. 
25 Catharine Throckmorton, born at Woodbury 
Virginia, in 1796. Died in Nashville, Tennessee. 

24 Hannah Fairfax Washington, third child of Warner, 
was born at Fairfield, Virginia, in April, 1767. Removed 
in 1787 to Gloucester county. Returned to Clarke 
county, about 1811. Died at Berryville, Virginia, Aug. 
3, 1828. Married at Fairfield, by Rev. Alexander Bel- 
maine, A. D. 1787, to Peter Beverly, son of Peter Beverly 
(and Elizabeth Burwell) Whiting, of Elmington, Vir- 
ginia. He died at Oakley, 1810-11. Children: 

25 Beverly Whiting, born in Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1788. Died infant. 
25 Warner Whiting, born in Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, Dec, 1790. 
25 Anne Beverly Whiting, born in Gloucester coun- 
ty, Virginia, Sept., 1792. 

25 Louisa Whiting, born in Gloucester county. Vir- 
ginia, Jan., 1795. 
25 Harriet Thacher Whiting, born in Gloucester 

county, Virginia, Sept., 1797. 
25 Hannah Fairfax Whiting, born in Gloucester 

county, Virginia, Dec, 1799. 
25 Petei; Beverly Whiting, born in Gloucester coun- 
ty, Virginia, A. D. 1802. 



WA SUING TON. 1 7 , 

25 Mary Blair Whiting, born in Gloucester county, 

Virginia, A. D. 1804. 
25 Louisa Skaife Whiting, born in Gloucester county, 

Virginia, A. D. 1807. 

24 Catharine Washington, fourth child of Warner, was 
born at Belvoir, Virginia, Apr. 7, 1769. Died at Rose- 
ville, Clarke county, Virginia, A. D. 1845. Mnrried at 
Fairfield, by Rev. Alexander Belmaine, in 1789, to Dr. 
John Nelson, son of Roger Nelson, of Frederick City, 
Maryland. He died at Frankfort, Jefferson county, Vir- 
ginia. Children : 

25 Philip Thomas Nelson, born Nov. 6, 1790. 

25 LuciNDA " " May 23, 1792. 

25 Hannah Fairfax " " Nov. 18, 1793. 

25 Louisa Washington " " A. D. 1796. 

25 George William " " A. D. 1798. 

25 Elizabeth Cary " " May, 1800. 

25 Geraldine " " about 1802. 

25 Anne Fairfax " " " 1805. 

24 Elizabeth Washington, fifth child of Warner, was born 
at Fairfield, Virginia, A. D. 1771. Died there a few 
months after her marriage. She was married at Fairfield, 
about 1790, by Rev. Mr. Belmaine, to George Booth, of 
Gloucester county, Virginia. 

24 Louisa Washington, sixth child of Warner, was born at 
Fairfield, Virginia, about 1775. Died at Fairfield, soon 
after marriage. Married at Fairfield, about 1795, by Rev. 
Alexander Belmaine, to Thomas Fairfax, eldest son of 
her uncle. Rev. Bryan (and Miss Cary) Fairfax, of 
Mount Eagle. 

24 Fairfax Washington, seventh child of Warner, was 

born at Fairfield, about 1778. Removed to Elkton, Ken- 

• tucky. Died there, in i860. Married at , about 



172 WASHINGTON. 

1804, to Sarah Armistead, of Hesse, Gloucester county, 
Virginia. She died at Elkton, Kentucky. Children : 

25 William Armistead Washington, born at Fair- 
field, Virginia, about 1805. 

25 Warner Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia. 

25 Mary Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia. 

25 Anne Olive Washington, born at Fairfield, Vir- 
ginia, about 1812. 

25 Fairfax Washington, born at Fairfield, Virginia. 

25 Virginia Washington, born at Elkton, Kentucky, 
about 1820. (All living in 1861.) 

24 Whiting Washington, eighth child of Warner, was 
born at Fairfield, Virginia, about 1780. Removed to 
Logan county, Kentucky. Died there. Married in Clarke 
county, Virginia, about 1805, to Rebecca, daughter of 
Charles Smith, of Berryville, Clarke county, Virginia, 
widow, living near Elkton, Kentucky. 

25 Charles Henry Washington, born at Elmington, 
Virginia, about 1806. 

25 Daughter, in Kentucky, about 1808. 

25 Daughter, " " 1810. 

24 Thacher Washington, only son of Henry, second of 
John, first of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born in Gloucester county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1740. 

" He married a daughter of Sir John Peyton, of Glou- 
cester county, and lived on the family estate left to his 
grandfather, John, at Mahodoe, in Westmoreland county. 
Had several children." 

24 John Lewis, first child of Catharine Washington (page 
123), fifth of John, first of Laurence, first of Col. John, 
of Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at , Virginia. 



WASHINGTON. 173 

24 Frances Lewis, second child of Catharine Washington, 
born at , Virginia. Died without issue. 

.24 Elizabeth Washington, first child of Augustine, sec- 
ond of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel 
John, was born at Wakefield, Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
about 1750. Married General Alexander Spotswood, of 
Spotsylvania county, Virginia. Children were : 

25 Henrietta Spotswood, born at , Virginia, 

about 1775. Married her cousin, Bushrod Washing- 
ton, of Mount Zephyr. 

25 Patsy Spotswood, born at , Virginia. Not 

married. 

25 William Spotswood, born at , Virginia. 

25 George Spotswood, born at , Virginia. 

24 Jane Washington, second child of Augustine, was born 
at Wakefield, Bridge's Creek, Virginia, about 1752. Mar- 
ried Colonel William Thornton, of Culpepper county, 
Virginia. 

24 Ann Washington, third child of Augustine, was born 
at Wakefield, Bridge's Creek, Virginia, abovit 1755. Mar- 
ried Burdet Ashton, of Westmoreland county, Virginia. 

25 Sarah Ashton, born at , Virginia, about 

1775. Married Nickolas Fitzhugh. Left child. 
Other children died young. 

24 Colonel William Augustine Washington, fourth 
child of Augustine, second of Augustine, second of 
Laurence, first of Colonel John, fifth of Leonard, first 
of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of 
Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of Robert, first 
of John, first of John, first of John, second of Robert, 
second of Robert, first of Robert, first of Walter, fourth 
of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bardolf, second of 



174 WASHINGTON. 

Torfin the Dane ; was born at Wakefield, Bridge's Creek,. 
Virginia, 25 Nov., 1757. ''Removed about 1802 to, and 
died at, Georgetown, Virginia, 2 or 10 Oct., 18] o. Was 
buried in the Vault at Mount Vernon. "He married his 
cousin Jane, 25 Sept., 1777, daughter of John Augustine 
Washington, of Bushfield, Westmoreland county, Vir- 
ginia, by whom he has four children." — General Washing- 
ton's Lette?-, 2 May, 1792. His children were: 

25 Augustine Washington, born at Harewood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1778. Died, aged 
20 years. 
25 CoRBiN Aylett Washington, born at Haywood,. 
Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1780. Died 
young. 
25 Hannah Bushrod Washington, born at Haywood^ 
Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1782. Died, 
aged 20 years. 
25 Bushrod Washington, born at Haywood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, 4 April, 1785. 
25 Ann Ayletta Washington, born at Haywood, 

Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1787. 
25 George Corbin Washington, born at Haywood, 

Westmoreland county, Virginia, 20 Aug., 1789. 
25 Laurence Washington, born at Haywood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, 26 Feb., 1791 ? 
Wife died about 1791. Married second, 10 July, 1792, to 
Mollie, or Polly, daughter of Richard Henry Led, of Chan- 
tilly, Westmoreland county, Virginia. No children. Mar- 
ried third, at , 11 May, 1799, to Sally, sister of CoL 

John Taylor, of Mount Airy, Richmond count}^, Virginia. 
Children by third wife : 

25 Sarah Taylor Washington, born at Haywood, 

14 Apr., 1800. 
25 William Augustine Washington, born at Hay- 
wood, 30 Aug., 1804. 
Other children died young. 



WASHINGTON. 175 

" This William Augustine Washington is the same men- 
tioned by General Washington, in his letter to Sir Isaac 
Heard {Appendix to Sparks Life of Washington, p. 507). The 
same also named by his will, first after his widow, as one 
of his Executors, and also as Legatee." 

EXTRACTS FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON'S WILL. 

Item. " To my nephew, William Augustine Washing- 
ton and his heirs (if he should conceive them to be objects 
worth prosecuting), and to his heirs, a lot in the Town of 
Manchester (opposite to Richmond), No. 265, drawn on my 
sole account, and also the tenth of one or two hundred 
acre lots, and two or three half acre lots in the city and 
vicinity of Richmond, drawn in partnership with nine 
others, all in the lottery of the deceased William Byrd, are 
given, — as is also a lot which I purchased of John Hood, 
conveyed by William Willie and Samuel Gordon, Trustees 
of the said John Hood, numbered 139, in tlie town of Edin- 
burgh, in the county of Prince George, State of Virginia." 

Item. " To each of my nephews, William Augustine 
Washington, George Lewis, George Steptoe Washington, 
Bushrod Washington, and Samuel Washington, I give one 
of the swords or cutteaux of which I may die possessed, 
and they are to chuse in the order they are named. These 
swords are accompanied with an injunction not to unsheath 
them for the purpose of shedding blood, except it be for 
self-defence, or in defence of their country and its rights, 
and in the latter case to keep them unsheathed, and prefer 
falling with them in their hands to the relinquishment 
thereof." 

Note. " These swords have all been presented by the Washington 
heirs to the people of the United States, through Congress. They are 
usually to be seen among the valuable Washington relics, in the Patent 
Office, at Washington City. During the Centennial Exposition they may 
be seen in the Government building in Fairmount Park." 



176 WASHINGTON. 

2/\. Fielding Lewis, fir;^ child of Betty Washington, sixth 
of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of 

Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at , about 1755. 

Children : 

25 Charles Lewis, born at , about 1780. 

25 Robert Lewis, born at , about 1782. 

25 Catharine Lewis, " " " 1785. 

Married H. C. Dale. 
25 LuciNDA Lewis, born at , about 1787. Mar- 
ried Stetson Foote. 
25 Nancy Lewis, born at •, about 1790. Mar- 
ried Thomas Davison. 
25 Elizabeth Lewis, born at , about 1792. Mar- 
ried Alexander Spotswood. 

24 Betty Lewis, second child of Betty Washington, sec- 
ond child of Augustine, by second wife, second of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, of Bridge's Creek, Virginia, and 
"Warton, England ; was born at Fredericksburgh, in Staf- 
ford county, Virginia, about 1758. Removed to Culpep- 
per county, thence to Frederick county, and thence to 
Deerwood, Pittsylvania county, Virginia. Died in April, 
1829, at Audley, the seat of Mr. Laurence Lewis, in 
Clarke county, Virginia. She was married at Freder- 
icksburgh, Virginia, 7 May, 1781, to Charles (of Cul- 
pepper county), son of Edward Carter, of Bernheim, 
Albemarle county, Virginia. Charles Carter removed 
to Deerwood, Pittsylvania county, Virginia. Died there, 
8 May, 1839, aged 64 years. 

extract from general Washington's will. 

Item. '' If Charles Carter, who intermarried with my 
niece, Betty Lewis, is not sufficiently secured in the title to 
the lots he had of me, in the Town of Fredericksburgh, it 
is my will and desire that my Executors shall make such 
conveyances of them, as the law requires to render it per- 
fect." Children of Charles and Betty Lewis Carter : 



. WASHINGTON. 177 

25 Betty Washington Carter, born at , Mar. 

15, 17G2. Died Oct. 29, 1795. 
25 Sally Champ Carter, born at , July 14, 1783. 

Died Oct. 19, 1784. 

25 Maria Ball Carter, born at , Nov. 17, 1784. 

25 Edward Carter, born at , Jan. 20, 1786. 

Died July 10, 1795. 
25 Fielding Carter, born at , July 20, 1787. 

Died July 28, 1787. 
25 Sally Peyton Carter, born at , Apr. 10, 

1789. Died 1806. 
25 George Washington Carter, born at , Mar. 

I, 1791. 
25 Charles Lewis Carter, born at , July i, 

1792. Died Aug., 1792. 
25 Mary Willis Carter, born at , July 13, 1793. 

Died Oct., 1793. 
25 Elizabeth Washington Carter, born at , 

Jan. 13, 1795. Died Dec. 27, 1811. 
25 Charles Edward Carter, born at , Apr. 16, 

1796. 
25 William Farley Carter, born at , Jan. i, 

1797. 
25 Eleanor Custis Lewis Carter, born at , 

Sept. 24, 1800. 
25 Laurence Fielding Carter, born at , Apr. 

22, 1803. 

25 Otwayanna Carter, born at , June 15, 1805. 

25 Edward Frederick Carter, born at , Nov. 

23, 1807. Died July 9, 1814. 

24 Major George Fielding Lewis, third child of Betty 

Washington, was born at , about 1760. Married 

Catharine Dangerfield. His children were : 

25 Samuel Lewis, born at , about 1790. 

12 



•17.8 WASHINGTON. 

25 Samuel Lewis, born at , about 1790. 

25 Dangerfield Lewis, born at , about 1795. 

25 Polly Lewis, " " " 1800. 

extract from general washington's will. 

Item. "To each of my nephews, William Augustine 
Washington, George Lewis, George Steptoe Washington, 
Bushrod Washington, and Samuel Washington, I give one 
of the swords or cutteaux of which I may die possessed, 
and they are to chuse in the order they are named." 

24 Laurence Lewis, sixth child of Betty Washington, sec- 
ond of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, 
of Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Woodlawn, Vir- 
ginia, about 1775. Married Eleanor Parke Custis, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. General Washington, Feb. 22, 1799. He had 
four children. 

24 Robert Lewis, fourth child of Betty Washington, was 
born at Woodlawn, Virginia, about 1765. Married Ju- 
dith Brown. Had two daughters : 

25 Judy Lewis, born at , about 1805. 

25 Betty Burnett Lewis, born at , about 1809. 

24 Howell Lewis, fifth child of Betty Washington, was 
born at Woodlawn, Culpepper county, Virginia, Dec. 12, 
1770. Removed in 1812 to Kanawha, Mason county, 
West Virginia, and died there, Dec. 26, 1822. He was 
married in Richmond, Virginia, Sept. 26, 1795, to Ellen 
Hackley Pollard (Born Dec. 7, 1776, and died at 
Marietta, Ohio, 15 Jan., 1859), daughter of Robert Pol- 
lard, of Richmond. "She removed, in 1834, to Mari- 
etta, Ohio, and died at the house of her daugh';;er, Mrs. 
. Lovell, in 1859." 

Howell Lewis was a favorite nephew of General Wash- 
ington, arid inherited from him some 1,300 acres of land, 



WASHINGTON. 179 

upon the Kanawha river, in Western Virginia, in Mason 
county, near the mouth of the Big Buffalo Creeli. Of this 
he took possession, in 181 2, with twelve male and six 
female slaves and their children, under the care of "Old 
Jack," a trusty old leader among them. 
Children of Howell Lewis : 

25 Betty Washington Lewis, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 14 Oct., 1796. Died at Marietta, Ohio, 2 July, 
1866. 
25 Robert Pollard Lewis, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 13 Oct., 1798. Died 4 Jan., 1853. 
25 George Richard Lewis, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 25 July, 1800. Died 3 Dec, 1843. 
^ 25 Ellen Jael Lewis, born at Richmond, Virginia, 28 
Jan., »8o2. Died 4 Oct., 1850. 
25 Frances Fielding Lewis, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, II Feb., 1805. 
25 Virginia Lewis, born at Richmond, Virginia, 13 

Sept., 1806. Died 9 Aug., 1843. 
25 Howell Lewis, born at Richmond, Virginia, 10 

July, 1808. 
25 Mary Ball Lewis, born at Richmond, Virginia, 2 

Jan., 1810. Died 2 Feb., 1810. 
25 John Edward Lewis, born at Richmond, Virginia, 

5 Nov., 181 1. Died . 

25 Laurence Lewis, born at Kanawha, Virginia, 15 

Dec, 1813. 
25 Henry Dangerfield Lewis, born at Kanawha, 
Virginia, 14 Jan., 1815. Died 1855. 

24 Thornton Washington, first child of Col. Samuel 
Washington (by second wife), third of Augustine (by sec- 
ond wife), second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; was born in Stafford county, 
Virginia, about 1760. He died before 1799, in Jefferson 



i8o WASHINGTON. 

county, Virginia. Was named in General Washington's 
will. 

He removed into Jefferson county, Virginia (formerly 
Berkeley county). Married first, Miss Berry, of Berry Plain 
on the Rappahannock River. Married second, Miss Wash- 
ington. Children : 

25 John Thornton Augustine Washington, born at 

, about 1790. 

25 Thomas Washington, born at , about 1792. 

Died young. 
25 Samuel Washington, by second wife, born at 

, about 1795. 

Thornton Washington served as an Ensign in the Army, 
under his uncle General Washington. He left his home tc^ 
join the Army before he was 16 years old. • 

24 Tristam Washington, second child of Colonel Samuel, 
sixth of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
fifth of Leonard, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first 
of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of 
John, first of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of 
John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Rob- 
ert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, 
first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born in 
Stafford county, Virginia, about 1763. 

• 

24 Frederick (or Ferdinand) Washington, third child of 
Colonel Samuel, was born at Harewood, Jefferson county, 
Virginia, about 1770. Died without issue. 

24 George Steptoe Washington, fourth child of Colonel 
Samuel, was born in Harewood, Jefferson county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1773. Removed about , to South Caro- 
lina. Buried in Augusta, Georgia. Married at Phila- 
delphia, about 1796, to Lucy Payne, daughter of Mr. 
Payne, of Virginia and Philadelphia. Children : 



WASHINGTON. i8i 

25 George Washington, born at , about 1797. 

Died infant. 

25 Samuel Walter Washington, born at , about 

1799. 

25 William Temple Washington, born at , 16 

July, 1800. 

25 George Steptoe Washington, born at , 15 

Oct., 1806. 
His widow married Hon. Thomas Todd, of Kentucky, As- 
sociate Justice of Supreme Court of United States. 

Item. ''To each of my nephews William Augustine 
Washington, George Lewis, George Steptoe Washington, 
Bushrod Washington, and Samuel Washington, I give one 
of the swords or ciitteaux of which I may die possessed, 
and thev are to chuse in the order they are named. These 
swords are accompanied with an injunction, not to un- 
sheath them for the purpose of shedding blood, except it 
be for self-defence, or in defence of their country and its 
rights, and in the latter case to keep them unsheathed, and 
prefer falling with them in their hands to the relinquish- 
ment thereof." 

Note. " These swords have all been presented by the Washington 
heirs to the people of the United States, through Congress. They are 
usually to be seen among the valuable Washington relics, in the Patent 
Office, at Washington City. During the Centennial Exposition they may 
be seen in the Government building, in Fairmount Park." 

24 Lawrence Augustine Washington, fifth child of Col. 
Samuel, sixth of Augustine, was born in Stafford 
county, Virginia, in 1775. Removed to Wheeling, Vir- 
ginia, 1815. " He died at Wheeling, Virginia, in Feb., 
1824, aged 49. He was a nephew and one of the heirs 
of General Washington. He married at Winchester, 
Virginia. A. D. 1798, Mary Dorcas, daughter of James (and 
Comfort) Wood, of Winchester, Virginia." Children : 
25 Robert Wood Washington, born in Mason county, 
Virginia, A. D. 1808. Died at Wheeling, 1843. 



i82 WASHINGTON. 

25 Emma Tei,l Washington, born in Mason coUnty, 

Virginia, A. D. 181 1. Died at Wheeling, 1838. 
25 Dr. Laurence A. Washington, born in Mason 

county, Virginia, Dec. 5, 1813, now (1877) at Denni- 

son, Texas. 
25 Mary Dorcas Washington, born in Mason county, 

Virginia, A. D. 1815. Died in Colorado county, 

Texas, Nov. 15, 1861. 

24 Harriot Washington, sixth child of Col. Samuel, was 
born in Stafford county, Virginia, about 1780. Removed 
to Baltimore, A. D. 1796 ; to Kanawha, Salines, 1818. 
Died there, Jan. 3, 1822. Married at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 4 July, 1796, to Andrew Parks, of Baltimore, son 
of John (and Margaret) Parks, of Ireland and Baltimore. 
Children : 

25 Anne Eli;^a Parks, born at Baltimore, A. D. 1797. 

Died at Maiden, West Virginia, A. D. 1852. 
25 Laurence Augustine Parks, born at Baltimore, 

A. D. 1801. Died at Kanawha, Salines, A. D. 1822. 
25 BusHROD Parks, born at Baltimore, A. D. 1806. 

Died in Louisiana, A. D. 1832. 
25 Laura Parks, born at Baltimore, 15 Nov., 1809. 
25 Andrew Parks, born at Baltimore, A. D. 181 1. 

Died at Charleston, West Virginia, A. D. 1863. 
25 Mary Parks, born at Baltimore, A. D. 1813. Died 

at Clifton, West Virginia. 
25 John Parks, born at Baltimore, A. D. 1816, now 
(1877) at Kanawha, Salines, West Virginia. 

24 Jane Washington, first child of John Augustine, eighth 
of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, 
of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, fifth 
of Leonard, of Warton, first of Laurence, first of Lau- 
rence, first of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, 
first of John, first of Robert, first of John, first of John, 



WASHINGTON. jj? 



o 



first of John, second of Robert, second of Robert, first of 
Robert, first of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Ak- 
aris, first of Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was 
born at Bushfield, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 
1758. Removed to Bridge's Creek, Virginia. Died there, 
A. D. 1791. 

She married William, first child of Augustine and Anne 
Aylett Washington, of Bridge's Creek, Virginia, third 
<:hild of Augustine, third of Laurence, first of Colonel 
John, of Bridge's Creek, Virginia. Had 4 children : • 

25 BusHROD Washington. 

25 George Corbin Washington 

25 William Washington. 

25 Jane Washington. 
These children are given in the line of William Wash- 
ington. 

24 Mildred Washington, second child of John Augustine, 

was born in Bushfield, about 1760. Died at , about 

. Married in Selby, Fairfax county, Virginia, about 

1780, to Thomas Lee, son of Hon. Richard Henry Lee, of 
Chantilly, Westmoreland county. 

25 Daughter. Married General Alexander, of . 

Mrs. Alexander died, leaving one son, Sudwell 
Alexander, of United States Army. 

24 Hon. Bushrod Washington, third child of John Augus- 
tine, was born in Westmoreland county, Virginia, 5 June, 
1762. He was of Mount Vernon, Virginia, and died in 
Philadelphia, whilst attending court, 26 Nov., 1829. 
He was the favorite nephew of his uncle, George. Re- 
moved, first to Richmond, Virginia, thence to Mount Ver- 
non, after General Washington's death. 

" Mount Vernon was willed by General Washington to 
his nephew, Hon. Bushrod Washington." 

"He was at an early age admitted to the bar of his native 



1 84 WASHINGTON. 

State, and arrived at such an eminence in liis profession^ 
that at the age of 36 he was selected by President Adams 
as a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 
He was married at Rippon Lodge, Prince William county, 
in 1785, to Ann, daughter of Colonel Thomas Blackburn, of 
Rippon Lodge, Prince William county. No issue. She 
died of grief at death of her husband, on her way home 
from Philadelpliia, in Nov., 1829." 

Bushrod Washington, LL. D. (N. J. Coll., 1803). jurist,. 
\Vas born in Westmoreland county, Virginia, June 5, 
1762, and died in Philadelphia, Nov. 26, 1829. Of William 
and Mary College, 1778. • He was the favorite nephew of 
the President. Studied law with James Wilson, of Phil- 
adelphia, and commenced practice with great success in his 
native county. He served as a private soldier at York- 
town ; was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, 
in 1787, and the next year was a member of the Conven- 
tion to ratify the United States Constitution : afterwards 
removed to Alexandria and thence to Richmond. Dec. 20, 
1798, he was appointed an Associate Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court. First President of the Coloniza- 
tion Society. Author of Reports in Court of Appeals, Vir- 
ginia, 1790-6, 2 vols., 8vo, 1798-9 ; Reports of United States 
Circuit Court, Third Circuit, 1803-27 ; edited by R. Peters, 
4 vols., 8vo, 1826-9." 

"Judge Bushrod Washington died at Philadelphia, Nov. 
26, 1829, aged 67. The first President of the American 
Colonization Society. The nephew of George Washing- 
ton, and heir of his books and papers. He was born in 
1762, and studied law with James Wilson. At the siege of 
Yorktown he was a private soldier, under Mercer. In 1797 
he wos appointed by Mr. Adams, a Judge of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, an office which he retained till 
his death. At the first annual meeting of the Colonization 
Society, he delivered an address which expresses his de- 
vout confidence in the blessing of God upon the instita- 



WA SHING TON. 1 85 

tion. His widow, the daughter of Mr. Blackburne, died 
in a few days after him. (His nephew, John Augustine 
Washington [the son of Corbin Washington], to whom he 
bequeathed the mansion at Mount Vernon, died June 14, 
1832, aged 43.) He was a man of integrity and simplicity 
of manners, devoted to the performance of his duties, a 
patriot and a Christian. He published Reports in the 
Court of Appeals of Virginia, 2 vols., 1798-9." 

EXTRACT FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON'S WILL. 

Item. "To my nephew, Bushrod Washington, I give 
and bequeath all the papers in my possession which relate 
to my civil and military administration of the affairs of 
this country. I leave to him also such of my private 
papers as are worth preserving ; and at the decease of my 
wife, and before, if she is not inclined to retain them, I 
give and bequeath my library of books and pamphlets of 
every kind." 

EXTRACT FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON'S WILL. 

Item. "To each of my nephews, William Augustine 
Washington, George Lewis, George Steptoe Washington, 
Bushrod Washington, and Samuel Washington, I give one 
of the swords or cutteaux of which I may die possessed, and 
they are to chiise in the order they are named. These 
swords are accompanied with an injunction not to unsheath 
them for the purpose of shedding blood, except it be for 
self defence, or in defence of their country and its rights, 
and in the latter case to keep them unsheathed, and prefer 
falling with them in their hands to the relinquishment 
thereof." 

Note. "These swords have all been presented by the Washington 
heirs to the people of the United States, through Congress. They are 
usually to be seen among the valuable Washington relics, in the Patent 



1 86 IVA SHING TON. 

Office, at Washington City. During the Centennial Exposition they may 
be seen in the Government building, in Fairmount Park." 

24 CoRBiN Washington, fovirth child of John Augustine, 
was born in Bushfield, Westmoreland county, about 
1765. He resided at Walnut Farm, Westmoreland county. 
Died about 1800, at Selby, Fairfax county, Virginia. 
Married at Chantilly, Westmoreland county, about 1786, 
to Hannah, daughter of Hon. Richard Henry Lee, of 
Chantilly, Westmoreland county, Virginia. Four chil- 
dren : His will was dated 19 Oct., 1799. 

25 Richard Henry Lee Washington, born at Walnut 
Farm. Wesi;moreland county, Virginia, A. D. 1787, 
Died unmarried. 
25 BusHROD CoRBiN WASHINGTON, born at Walnut 

Farm, Westmoreland county, Virginia, A. D. 1790. 
25 John Augustine Washington, born at Walnut 
Farm, Westmoreland county, Virginia, in Fall of 1792. 
25 Marv Lee Washington,' born at Walnut Farm, 

Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1795. 
25 Jane Washington, born at Walnut Farm, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1800. 

24 William Augustine Washington, fifth child of John 
Augustine, was born in Bushfield, Westmoreland county, 
Virginia, about 1767. 
He was killed whilst at school at , in Maryland. 

24 CoL. George Augustine Washington, first child of 
Col. Charles, fifth of Augustine, by second wife, second 
of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, fifth of Leonard, of Warton, 
first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, 
first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, first of 
Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, second 
of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first of 
Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of Bar- 



WASHINGTON. 187 

dolf, second of Torfin the Dane, was born in Stafford 
county, Virginia, about 1763 Will dated 24 Jan., 1793. 
He was Colonel in the American Army. 
" He married, Oct. 15, 1785, Frances, daughter of Col. 
Burwell Bassett, of New Kent county, Virginia, by whom 
he has (1792) had four children, three of whom are living.' 
— General Washington s Letter. Viz. : 

25 George Fayette Washington, born at 

Apr. 10, 1*787. Died infant. 

25 Anna Maria Washington, born at , Apr. 3 

1788. 

25 George Fayette Washington, born at 

Jan. 17, 1790. Died at Waverly, Sept., 1867. 

25 Charles Augustine Washington, born at 

Nov. 3, 1791. Died at Cadiz, unmarried. 

24 Capt. Samuel Washington, second child of Col. 
Charles, was born in Stafford county, Virginia, about 
1767. He was of Fredericksburgh, Virginia ; was Cap- 
tain in the American Army. He removed to Kanawha, 
West Virginia. Unmarried in 1792. Married about 1795, 
to Dorothea, daughter of . Children : 

25 Samuel T. Washington, born about 1796. 

25 Augustine C. " " 1798. 

25 George F. " " 1800. 

25 Frances A. " " 1805. 

24 Frances Washington, third child of Colonel Charles, 
was born in Stafford county, Virginia, about 1770. 
She married Colonel Burgess Ball, of the American 
Army. Had several children : 

25 Fayette Ball, born about 1792. 
25 Charles " " i795- 
25 Mildred " " i797- 
25 Frances " " 1800. 
25 Martha " " 1805. 
Married second, Francis Peyton, of . 



1 88 WASHINGTON. 

24 Mildred Washington, fourth child of Colonel Charles, 
was born in Stafford county, Virginia, about 1772. Died 
without issue. 

She married Colonel Thomas Hammond, of the Ameri- 
can Army. 

25 Warner Washington, first child of Warner, first of 
Warner, first of John, first of Laurence, first of Colonel 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's XDreek, Virginia, 
was born at Clifton, Virginia, 7 Dec, 1771. He died un- 
married while attending medical lectures in Philadelphia. 

25 John Whiting Washington, second child of Warner, 
was born at Clifton, Virginia, 4 Oct., 1773. Removed to 
Kentucky, where he died. Married Fanny Baylor, of 
Jefferson county, Virginia. Children : 

26 Robert Washington, born about 1800. 
26 Henry " " 1802. 

26 GWYNN " " 1805. 

26 Tucker " " 1807. 

26 Emily " " i8io. 

26 Eliza " " 1812. 

25 Frances Washington, third child, was born at Clif- 
ton, Gloucester county, Virginia, 30 April, 1775, ^"^ 
died in Clarke county, Virginia, A. D. 1810. She was 
married in Clarke county, Virginia, to William, son 
of Edmond (and Elizabeth Taliafiero) Snicker, of Clarke 
county, Virginia. Died A. D. 1822. Children : 
26 Mary Snicker, born in Clarke county, Virginia, 

about 1793. Dead. 
26 William Snicker, born in Clarke county, Virginia, 

about 1795. Dead. 
26 Emily Snicker, born in Clarke county, Virginia, 

about 1797. Dead. , 



WASHINGTON. 189 

26 Edward Snicker, born in Clarke county, Virginia, 

about 1803. Dead. 
26 Elizabeth Snicker, born in Clarke county, Vir- 

'ginia, 15 Oct., 1806. 
26 Beverly Snicker, born in Clarke county, Virginia, 

about 1808. Dead. 

25 Emily Washington, fourth child of Warner, was born 
at Clifton, Virginia, May 8, 1778. Died in Clarke 
county, Virginia, about 1795. 

25 Sidney Washington, fifth child of Warner, was born at 
Clifton, Virginia, May 31, 1780. Died at , about 1800. 

.25 Henry Washington, sixth child of Warner, was born 
at Clifton, Virginia, Mar. 8, 1782. Removed to Alabama, 
in 1836, returned to Clarke county, Virginia, in 1841. 
Died there, in 1852. Married at Berryville, Virginia, by 
Bishop Meade. May 15, 1815, to Louisa Washington, 
daughter of P. B. (and Hannah Washington) Whiting, 
formerly of Elmington, Virginia. 

26 Warner Blair Washington, born at 
26 Beverly " 

26 Henry Sharpe " 

married. 
26 Harriet Anna " 

married. 
26 Virginia Meade " 

married. 
26 Hannah ** 

in childhood. 
26 John Cary " 



« 


« 




« 


t( 


Not 


M 


« 


Not 


M 


(i 


Not 


M 


\ 


Died 



(( 



25 Francis Whiting Washington, seventh child of Warner, 
was born at Clifton, June 18, 1784. Married Miss Hall, 
of Nashville, Tennessee. Died in Kentucky, leaving 
children. 



I90 WASHINGTON. 

25 Beverly Washington, eighth child of Warner, was- 
born at Clifton, Virginia, Aug. 25, 1786. Died unmar- 
ried in South America. 

25 Perrin Washington, ninth child of Warner, was born 
at Clifton, Virginia, 7 Feb., 1790. Removed to Wash-^ 
ington. D. C. Died there, A. D. 1857. Married at the 
old chapel, in Clarke county, by Bishop Meade, to Han- 
nah Fairfax, daughter of P. B. Whiting (and Hannah 
Washington). 
26 Hannah Fairfax Washington, born, about 1815.. 

Died unmarried. 
26 William Dickinson " " " 1817. 

Died unmarried. 

26 Louisa " " " 1820.. 
Died unmarried. 

27 John Henry " " " 1822. 
Married Selina Carter, and lives in Fauquier county, 
Virginia. 

25 Reade Washington, tenth child of Warner, -was borui 
at Audley, Virginia, May 18, 1796. Removed to Cham- 
bersburgh, Pennsylvania, thence to Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he died. Married at , about 1820, to 

Miss Crawford, of Chambersburgh, Pennsylvania. 

26 Warner Fairfax Washington, born about 1822.. 

Died infant. 
26 Crawford Washington, born about 1825. Killed. 

in late war. 
26 Augustus Washington, born about 1827. 



26 Virginia 


(< 


« 


« 


1830. 


26 BUSHROD 


« 


(( 


u 


1832. 


26 Thomas 


(( 


(( 


« 


1835. 


26 Kate 


(( 


« 


« 


1837. 


26 Mary 


« 


(( 


« 


1840, 


26 Louisa 


« 


(( 


(( 


1842. 



WASHINGTON. 191 

26 Herbert Washington, born about 1845. 
26 Rebecca " " " 1847. 

25 Thacher Washington, eleventh child of Warner, was 
born at Audley, Virginia, Dec. 5, 1797. Died infant. 

25 Elizabeth Warne:^ Washington, twelfth child of 
Warner, was born at Audley, Virginia, Sept. 28, 1800. 
Now (1877) at Berryville, Clarke county, Virginia. Un- 
married. 

25 Fairfax Washington, thirteenth child of Warner, was 
born at Audley, Virginia, 30 Mar., 1802. Removed in 183-, 
to Mississippi. Now (i87'7) there. Married first, E!nily, 
daughter of Lewis Burwell (and Maria Brown) Whiting. 
One child : 

26 Louisa Washington, born about 1825. 
Married second, . Children : 

26 Sarah Washington, born about 1830. 

26 Warner " " " 1832. 

26 Martha " " " 1835. 

26 John «' " " 1837. 

26 Mary " " " 1840. 

26 Elizabeth Warner Washington, born about 1842. 

26 Reade Washington, born about 1845. 

25 William Herbert Washington, fourteenth child of 
Warner, was born at Audley, Virginia, 30 May, 1803. 
Died in Westmoreland county, Virginia. Married at 

, to Lousia, daughter of Lewis Burwell (and Maria 

Brown) Whiting. No children. 

25 Alexander Hamilton Washington, fifteenth child of 
Warner, was born at Audley, Virginia, 5 Mar., 1805. 
Died in Texas unmarried, in 1876. 

25 Mary Herbert Washington, sixteenth child of War- 



192 WA SHING TON. 

ner, was born at Audley, Virginia, 25 Sept., 1808. Died in 
Texas, in 187-. Married Dr. Beasley. Children : 

26 Herbert Beasley, born in Texas, about 1830. . 

26 Hamilton " " " " 1832. 

26 Sarah ". " . " « 1835. 

26 Lucy '* " " " 1837. 

26 John " « . « " 1840. 

25 Warner Washington Throckmorton, first child of 
Mildred Washington, second of Warner, first of Warner, 
first of John, first of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of 
Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; was 
born at Woodbury, Virginia, in Feb., 1792, and died in 
Jellerson county. West Virginia, in 1855. 

25 Hannah Fairfax Throckmorton, second child of Mil- 
dred Washington, was born at Woodbury, Virginia, A. D 
1793. Died at Memphis, Tennessee, in 1858. 

25 Catharine Throckmorton, third child of Mildred 
Washington, was born at Woodbury, Virginia, A. D. 
1796. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. 

25 Beverly Whiting, first child of Hannah Fairfax Wash- 
ington, third of Warner, first of Warner, first of John, 
first of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, Eng- 
land, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born in Glouces- 
ter county, Virginia, A. D. 1788. Died infant. 

25 Warner Washington Whiting, second child of Han- 
nah Fairfax Washington, was born at Gloucester county, 
Virginia, in Dec, 1790. Died in Sumter county, Ala- 
bama, A. D. 1840. 

25 Ann Beverly Whiting, third child of Hannah Fairfax 
Washington, was born in Gloucester county, Virginia, 
in Sept., 1792. Died in Richmond, A. D. 1870. 



WASHINGTON. 193 

25 Louisa Washington Whiting, fourth child of Hannah 
Fairfax Washington, was born in Jan., 1795. Now (1877) 
at Berryville. 

25 Harriet Thacher Whiting, fifth child of Hannah 
Fairfax Washington, was born in Gloucester county, 
Virginia, in Sept., 1797. Died in Richmond, Virginia, 
1873- 

25 Hannah Fairfax Whiting, sixth child of Hannah 
Fairfax Washington, was born in Gloucester county, 
Virginia, in Dec, 1799. Now (1877) in Fauquier county, 
Virginia. 

25 Peter Beverly Whiting, seventh child of Hannah 
Fairfax Washington, was born in Gloucester county, 
Virginia, A. D. 1802. Died in Sumter county, Alabama. 

25 Mary Blair Whiting, eighth child of Hannah Fairfax 
Washington, was born in Gloucester county, Virginia, 
A. D. T804. Died at Richmond, Virginia, 1828. 

25 Louisa Skaife Whiting, ninth child of Hannah Fairfax 
Washington, was born in Gloucester county, Virginia, 
A. D. 1807. Died in Richmond, Virginia. 

25 Philip Thomas Nelson, first child of Catharine Wash- 
ington, fourth of Warner, first of Warner, first of John, 
first of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, 
and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Rossville, 
Clarke county, Virginia, Nov. 6, 1790. Died in Alex- 
andria, Virginia, about 1810. 

25 LuciNDA N. Nelson, second child of Catharine Wash- 
ington, was bor^n at Rossville, Clarke county, Virginia, 
May 23, 1792. Died in Clarke county. 
13 



194 WASHINGTON. 

25 Hannah Fairfax Nelson, third child of Catharine 
Washington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Vir- 
ginia, Nov. 18, 1793. Died at Beverly, Jefferson county, 
West Virginia. ' 

25 Louisa Washington Nelson, fourth child of Catharine 
Washington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1796. Died in Clarke county, in Feb., 1858. 

25 George William Nelson, fifth child of Catharine 
Washington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1798. Died in Clarke county, Virginia. 

25 Elizabeth Cary Nelson, sixth child of Catharine 
Washington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Vir- 
ginia, in May, 1800. Died at Winchester, Virginia, in 
Feb., 1876. 

25 Geraldine Nelson, seventh child of Catharine Wash- 
ington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Virginia, 
A. D. 1802. Died there, in 1828. 

25 Ann Fairfax Nelson, eighth child of Catharine Wash- 
ington, was born at Rossville, Clarke county, Virginia, 
about 1805. Died in childhood. 

25 William Armistead Washington, first child of Fairfax 
Washington, seventh of Warner, first of John, first of 
Laurence, first of John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born at Fairfield, Virginia, about 
1805. Was living, 1861. 

25 Warner Washington, second child of Fairfax Wash- 
ton, was born at Fairfield, Virginia, abput 1807. Living, 
1861. 



WA SUING TON. 1 95 

25 Mary Washington, third child of Fairfax Washington, 
was born at Fairfield, Virginia, about 1810. Living, 
1861. 

25 Ann Olive Washington, fourth child of Fairfax Wash- 
ington, vsras born at Fairfield, Virginia, about 1812. Liv- 
ing, 1861. 

25 Fairfax Washington, fifth child of Fairfax Washing- 
ton, was born at Fairfield, Virginia, about 1815. Living, 
1861. 

25 Virginia Washington, sixth child of Fairfax Washing- 
ton, was born at Elkton, Kentucky, about 1818. Living, 
1861. 

25 Charles Henry Washington, first child of Whiting 
Washington, eighth of Warner, first of Jolin, first of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Elmington, Vir- 
ginia, about 1805. 

25 Daughter of Whiting Washington, was born at Elming- 
ton, Virginia, about 1807. 

25 Daughter of Whiting Washington, was born at Elming- 
ton, Virginia, about 1810. 

25 Augustine Washington, first child of William Augus- 
tine Washington, fourth of Augustine, second of Augus- 
tine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, 
England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Hay- 
wood, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 1778. Died, 
aged 20 years. 

25 Corbin Aylett Washington, second child of William 



196 WASHINGTON. 

Augustine Washington, was born at Haywood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1780. Died young. 

25 Hannah Bushrod Washington, third child of William 
Augustine Washington, was born at Haywood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1782. Died, aged 21 
years. 

25 Bushrod Washington, fourth child of William Augus- 
tine Washington, fourth of Augustine, second of Augus- 
tine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, and of Jane 
Washington, first of John Augustine, seventh of Augus- 
tine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born at Haywood, Virginia, Apr. 
4, 1785. Settled at Mount Zephyr, Virginia. Married 
his cousin, Henrietta, daughter of General Alexander 
Spotswood, of Spotsylvania county, Virginia. Children : 

26 Spotswood Augustine Washington. 

26 Anne " 

26 Jane Mildred " Died unmarried. 

26 George " 

26 John " 

26 Mary " 

26 Corbin " 

26 Frances or Fanny " Married Finch. 

Widow. Now (i877)-"at Morrisania. 
Bushrod Washington died at Mount Zephyr, in 1830, 
and was interred in vault at Mount Vernon. 

25 Ann Aylette Washington, fifth child of William 
Augustine Washington, was born at Haywood, West- 
moreland county, Virginia, about 1787. Died, and was 
buried at Mount Vernon. Married William Robinson, 
of Westmoreland. No children. 



WASHINGTON. 197 

25 George Corbin Washington, sixth child of William 
Augustine, third of Augustine, second of Augustine, sec- 
ond of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia ; was born at Harewood, Virginia, 20 Aug., 

1789. Removed about ,to Georgetown, D. C. Died 

there, 17 July, 1854. 

Married at Dunbarton, near Georgetown, in 1807, to 
Eliza Ridgeley Beall, daughter of Thomas (and Ann Orme) 
Beall, of Dunbai-ton, near Georgetown, D. C. She died at 
Georgetown, I July, 1820. Eight children. All died young 
except : 

26 Lewis William Washington, born at Georgetown, 

30 Nov., 1812. 
26 Eleanor Washington (by second wife, Ann Peter, 
daughter of Colonel John Peter). Died, aged 20, un- 
married. 
26 Gkorgf, CoRHiN Washington, born at Georgetown, 
about — — . Died July, 1854, at Georgetown, D. C, 
and was buried at Oak Hill, near there. 

25 Laurence Washington, seventh child of William Au- 
gustine, was born at Haywood, Virginia. 26 Feb., 1791, 
and died 15 Mar., 1875. 

25 Sarah Tavloe, eighth child of William Augustine 
Washington, was born at Haywood, Virginia, 14 Apr., 
1800. and died in , Mar. 15, 1875. Married at Hay- 
wood, Virginia, by Rev. W. Wilmer, of Alexandria, 20 
Oct., 1819, to Lawrence Washington, third child of Henry 
Washington, of Westmoreland county, Virginia. Eight 
sons and three daughters : 

26 Henry Augustine Washington, born at Haywood, 

Virginia, 24 Aug., 1820. 
26 John Tayloe Washington, born at Blenheim, Vir- 
ginia, 20 Dec, 1822. 
26 George Washington, born at Cedar Hill, Virginia^ 
24 July, 1825. 



198 WASHINGTON. 

26 Richard Bushrod Washington, born at Blenheim, 
Virginia, 21 June, 1827. 

26 MAin^ West Washington, born at Blenheim, Vir- 
ginia, 13 O.ct., 1828. 

26 Sarah Ashton Washington, born at Campbell- 
town, Virginia, 17 Aug., 1831. 

26 William Augustine Washington, born at Blen- 
■ heim, Virginia, 5 Mar., 1833. 

26 Laurence Washington, born at Campbelltown, 
Virginia, i May, 1836. 

26 Elizabeth Washington, born at Blenheim, Vir- 
ginia, 23 Nov., 1838. 

id Robert J. Washington, born at Campbelltown, 
Virginia, 16 Sept., 1841. 

26 Llovi) Washington, born at Blenheim, Virginia, 
2 Nov., 1846. 
Mr. Laurence Washington, now (1877) at Blenheim, on 
Bridge's Creek, Westmoreland county, Virginia. 

25 William Augustine Washington, ninth child of Wil- 
liam Augustine Washington, was born at Haywood, Vir- 
ginia, 30 Aug., 1804. Died there, 26 Jan., 1830. Married 

at , about , to Julia E. Bayard, of Princeton, 

New Jersey. Three children : 

26 Julia Augusta Washington, born at . Now 

(1877) Mrs. Dabney C. Wirt, at Oak Grove, Vir- 
ginia, son of William Wirt. 
Two children died infants. 

25 Judy Lewis, first child of Robert Lewis, fourth of Betty 
Washington, sixth of Augustine, second of Laurence, 
first of John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, was born at Fredericksburgh, Virginia, about 
1800. Died young. 

25 Lewis, second child of Robert Lewis, was born at Fred- 
ericksburgh, Virginia, about 1803. 



WASHINGTON. 195 

25 Lewis, third child of Robert Lewis, was born at Fred- 
ericksburgh, Virginia, about 1805, 

25 Judy Lewis, fourth child of Robert Lewis, was born at 
Fredericksburgh, Virginia, about 1807. 

25 Betty Burnett Lewis, fifth child of Robert Lewis, 
was born at Fredericksburgh, about 1809. Removed 
about 1828, to Etham, New Kent county, Virginia, and 
to Hanover county, about 1847. Now (1877) there. Mar- 
ried at Fredericksburgh, by Rev. E.G. McGuire, in Aug., 
1827, to George Washington Bassett, son of John (and 
Betty Carter Browne Burwell) Bassett. Children : 
26 Betty Burwell Basse.tt, born at Etham, New 

Kent county, Virginia, about 1828. 
26 George Washington Bassett, born at Etham, New 

Kent county, Virginia, about 1832. 
26 Anna Virginia Bassett, born at Etham, New Kent 

county, Virginia, about 1835. 
26 Ella More Bassett, born at Etham, New Kent 

county, Virginia, Sept. 7, 1837. 
26 Judith Frances Carter Bassett, born at Etham, 

New Kent county, Virginia, about 1840. 
2(i Mary Burnet r Bassett, born at Etham., New Kent 

county, Virginia, about 1842. 
26 Annette Lewis Bassett, born at Etham, New 

Kent county, Virginia, about 1845. 
26 Robert Bassett, born at Etham, New Kent county, 

Virginia, about . 

26 William Augustine Bassett, born at Etham, New 
Kent county, Virginia, about . 

25 Betty Washington Carter, first child of Mrs. Betty 
Lewis Carter, first of Mrs. Betty Washington Lewis, sec- 
ond of Augustine Washington, by second wife, second of 
Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, England, and 



200 WASHINGTON. 

Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; was born at . Virginia, 

15 Mar., 1782, and died there, 29 Oct., 1795. 

25 Sally Champ Carter, second child of Mrs. Betty Lewis 

Carter, was born at , 14 July, 1783, and died, 19 

Oct., 1784. 

25 Maria Ball Carter, third child of Mrs. Betty Lewis 

Carter, was born at , 17 Nov., 1784, and died at 

, 29 Jan., 1823. Married at , A. D. 1801, to 

George Tucker, of Richmond, Virginia. Children : 

26 Daniel George Tucker, born at , 20 Nov.,. 

1802. 

26 Eleanor Rosalie Tucker, born at -, 8 May,. 

1804. Died, Oct., 1818. 

26 Maria Farley Tucker, born at , 6 Nov., 

1805. 

26 Eliza Lewis Carter Tucker, born at , 9 Dec.,. 

1808. 

26 Mary Lelia Tucker, born at , 5 Aug., 1810. 

Died, July, 1816. 

25 Edward Carter, fourth child of Mrs. Betty Lewis Car- 
ter, was born at , 20 Jan., 1786, and died, 10 July,, 

1795- 

25 Fielding Carter, fifth child of Mrs. Betty Lewis Carter^ 
was born at , 20 July, 1787, and died, 28 July, 1817. 

25 Sally Peyton Carter, sixth child of Mrs. Betty Lewis 

Carter, was born at , Apr. 10, 1789, and died, A. D. 

1806. 

25 George Washington Carter, seventh child of Mrs. 

Betty Lewis Carter, was born at , Mar. i, 1791^ 

and removed about , to Mississippi. Married at 

Fredericksburgh, Virginia, to Mary, daughter of ,. 

Wormley, of . Left four daughters. 



WA SUING TON. 2 o 1 

25 Charles Lewis Carter, eighth child of Mrs. Betty 

Lewis Carter, was born at , July i, 1792, and died 

in Aug., 1792. 

25 Mary Willis Carter, ninth child of Mrs. Betty Lewis 

Carter, was born at , July 13, 1793, and died in 

Oct., 1793. 

25 Elizabeth Washington Carter, tenth child of Mrs. 

Betty Lewis Carter, was born at , Jan. 13, 1795, 

and died, Dec. 27, 1811. 

25 Charles Edward Carter, eleventh child of Mrs. Betty 
Lewis Carter, was born at , Apr. 16, 1796. 

25 William Farley Carter, twelfth child of Mrs. Betty 
Lewis Carter, was born at , Jan. i, 1797, and re- 
moved about , to Kentucky. Left three children. 

25 Eleanor Custis Lewis Carter, thirteenth ihild of 

Mrs. Betty Lewis Carter, was born at , Sept. 24, 

1800. Married in 1823, Henry Brown. Two children. 
Married, second, in 1835, to Dr. Patterson, of Lynch- 
burgh, Virginia, and died in 1845, leaving four children. 

25 Lawrence Fielding Carter, fourteenth child of Mrs. 

Betty Lewis Carter, was born at , Apr. 22, 1803. 

Stationed at Fort Smith, in Arkansas. Married and died 
there, leaving two sons. 

25 Otwayanna Carter, fifteenth child of Mrs. Betty Lewis 

Carter, was born at , June 15, 1805. Married Dr. 

W. Owens, of Lynchburgh, Virginia, and died without 
issue. 

25 Edward Frederick Carter, sixteenth child of Mrs. 



302 WASHINGTON. 

Betty Lewis Carter, was born at , Nov. 23, 1807, 

and died, July 9, 1814. 

25 Betty Washington Lewis, first child of Howell Lewis, 
fourth of Betty Washington, second of Augustine, by 
second wife, second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, 
of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; 
was born at Richmond, Virginia, 14 Oct., 1796. Re- 
moved to Marietta, Ohio. Died there, 2 July, 1866. Mar- 
ried at , 19 Feb., 1818, to Colonel Joseph Lovell, 

of Charlestown, West Virginia. He died there, 25 Nov., 
1835, whose father was of England. Children : 

26 Alfred Lovell, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, Kanawha C. H., 27 Dec, 1818. Dead. 
26 Richard Channing Moore Lovell, born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, Kanawha C. H., 3 Mar., 1822. 
26 Howell Lewis Lovell, born at Charlestown, West 

Virginia, Kanawha C. H., 9 July, 1824. 
26 Joseph Lovell, born at Georgetown, West Virginia, 
Kanawha C. H., 31 Mar., 1827. Died, 22 Mar., 1865. 
26 Betty Lovell, born at Georgetown, West Virginia, 

Kanawha C. H., about 1829. 
26 Fayette Augustine Lovell, born at Georgetown, 
West Virginia, Kanawha C. H., about 1830. 

25 Robert Pollard Lewis, second child of Howell Lewis, 
was born at Richmond, Virginia, 13 Oct., 1798. Died at 
, unmarried, 4 Jan., 1853. 

25 George Richard Lewis, third child of Howell Lewis, 
was born at Richmond, Virginia, 25 July, 1800. He died 
at Osceola, Missouri, 3 Dec, 1843. 
He was married at Morgansfield, Kentucky, in 1833, to 

Widow Eliza McLean, daughter of William Bayless, of 

Culpepper county, Virginia. Children : 

26 Ellen Eliza Lewis, born at , 18 July, 1834. 



WASHING TON. . c - 

26 Jeannette Lewis, born at , 2 July, 1837. 

Died, Dec, 1843. 
26 Harold Lewis, born at , 14 Aug., 1839. Died 

1863. 
26 George Lewis, born at , 14 Sept., 1842. 

25 Ellen Jael Lewis, fourth child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Richmond, Virginia, 28 Jan., 1802. Removed in 
Dec.^ 1812, to Charlestown, West Virginia. To Marietta, 
Ohio, in Feb., 1834. Returned to Charlestown, Nov., 
1843. Died there, 4 Oct., 1850. 

Married first, at Charlestown, 21 Jan., 1819, by Rev. 
Henry Ruffner, to Robert McAmey Steele, of Charlestown, 
West Virginia, son of Richard (and Martha McAmey) 
Steele, of Lexington, Kentucky. Children : 

26 William Steele, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 12 Dec, 1819. Died at Windsor, Missouri, 7 
Oct., 1872. 
26 Martha Ellen Steele, born at Charlestown, West 

Virginia, 5 July, 1821. 
26 Howell Lewis Steele, born at Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 31 Dec, 1822. Died at Ophir, California, 
26 Dec, 1850. 
26 Robert McAmey Steele, born at Charlestown, 
West Virginia, 28 Dec, 1824. Died at Charlestown, 
West Virginia, 16 July, 1844. 
26 Betty Washington Steele, born at Charlestown, 
West Virginia, 10 Dec, 1826. 
Her husband died at Charlestown, West Virginia, 28 Feb., 
1827. She was married second, at Marietta, Ohio, by Rev. 
Edward Winthrop, 28 Nov., 1843, to Dr. Spicer Patrick, of 
Charlestown, West Virginia. No children. He now 
(1876) resides at Charlestown, West Virginia. 

25 Frances Fielding Lewis, fifth child of Howell Lewis, 
was born at Richmond, Virginia, 11 Feb., 1805. Now 



204 WASHINGTON. 

(1877) there. Married there, by Rev. Dr. John D. Blair, 
27 June, 1822, to Humphrey Brooke Gwathmey, son of 
Temple (and Ann) Gwathmey, of Richmond. He died 
at Richmond, 22 Oct., 1852. Children : 

26 William Gaston Gwathmey, born at Savannah, 
Georgia, 2 April, 1823. Died, 5 Aug., 1852. 

26 Ellen Jael Gwathmey, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 26 Sept., 1824. Died at Rockbridge Baths, 
Virginia, 5 Oct., 1870. 

26 Humphrey Brooke Gwathmey, born at Richmond, 
Virginia, 5 June, 1826. Died, 5 Nov., 1826. 

26 Matilda Cuming Gwathmey, born at New York, 
6 Jan., 1828. 

26 Virginia Gwathmey, born at New York, 31 Dec, 
1830. 

26 Theodore Francis Gwathmey, born at Norfolk, 
Virginia, 21 May, 1832. 

26 Temple Gwathmey, born at Norfolk, Virginia, A. 
D. 1834. Died, 12 Nov., 1840. 

26 Fanny Brooke Gwathmey, born at Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, 8 Sept., 1835. 

26 Caroline Heth Gwathmey, born at Mobile, Ala- 
bama, A. D. 1837. Died at Richmond, Virginia, 9 
May, 1842. 

26 Mary Ann Gwathmey, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1841. Died, 9 May, 1849. 

26 Emily Carter Gwathmey, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1843. Died, 26 Mar., 1849. 

26 Robert Washington Gwathmey, born at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, 22 June, 1846. 

25 Virginia Lewis, sixth child of Howell Lewis, was born 
at Richmond, Virginia, 13 Sept., r8o6. Removed to 
Buffalo, West Virginia. Died, 9 Aug., 1843, at Moren's 
Bottom, Mason county. West Virginia. Married at Buf- 
falo, in Mason county. West Virginia, 6 Jan., 1825, to 



WASHINGTON. 205 

Robert Ammon Hereford (died at Warrensburgh, Mis- 
souri, Oct., i860), son of Robert Hereford, of Mason 
county, Virginia. Children : 

26 Robert Hereford, born at Buffalo, Mason county, 

West Virginia, 17 July, 1827. 
26 Brook Gwathmey Hereford, born at Buffalo, 

Mason county, West Virginia, 16 Dec, 1829. 
26 Mary Brenaugh Hereford, born at Buffalo, Mason 

county, West Virginia, 25 Jan., 1832. Died, 23 Mar., 

1836. 
26 Frances Eliza Hereford, born at Buffalo, Mason 

county. West Virginia, 4 June, 1834. 
26 Katherine Ellen Hereford, born at Buffalo, 

Mason county. West Virginia, about 1836. 
26 Lawrence Lewis Hereford, born at Buffalo, Mason 

county. West Virginia, about 1838 
26 Betty Stribling Hereford, born at Buffalo, 

Mason county, West Virginia, about 1840. 

25 Howell Lewis, seventh child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Richmond, Virginia, 10 July, 1808. Removed 
to Calhoun or Lewis, Missouri, in Nov., 1836, now 
(1877) Lewis, Henry county, Missouri. Married in Mason 
county, Virginia, 14 Jan., 1831, to Emily G., daughter of 
William (and Grace) Burch. She died near Calhoun, 
Missouri, 13 May, 1866. Children : 

26 George Lewis, born in Mason county, Virginia, 

27 Oct., 1831. 
29 Mary Ellen Lewis, born at Mason county, Vir- 
ginia, 28 Jan., 1834. Died at Salem, Illinois. 
26 Augustus D. Lewis, born at Mason county, Vir- 
ginia, 8 Nov., 1836. Died near Calhoun, 10 Feb., 

1853- 
26 Fielding Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 9 Mar., 

1839. Died 21 Mar., 1863. 



2o6 WASHINGTON. 

26 Columbia Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 24 
Sept., 1842. 

26 Virginia Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 11 
Mar., 1845. 

26 Bettie F. Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 2& 
Sept., 1848. 

26 William Howell Lewis, born at Calhoun, Mis- 
souri, 26 Jan., 1850. 

26 Gaston G. Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 28 
Jan., 1853. 

26 Emma A. Lewis, born at Calhoun, Missouri, 28- 
Sept., 1855. 

25 Mary Ball Lewis, eighth child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Richmond, Virginia, 2 Jan., 1810. Died 2 Feb., 
1810. 

25 John Edward Lewis, ninth child of Howell Lewis, was 

born at Richmond, Virginia, 5 Nov., 181 1. Died . 

Widow, Mary M. Lewis, resides (1877) Osceola, Missouri. 

25 Dr. Lawrence Lewis, tenth child of Howell Lewis, was 
born in Mason county, Virginia, 15 Dec, 1813. Removed 
in 1839, to Osceola, Missouri. Now (1877) there. He was 
married, first, in Benton county, Missouri, 14 Feb., 1843, 
-to Mary, daughter of Robert (and Diademia) Ferguson. 
She died in Benton county, Missouri, 26 Dec, 1845. Her 
children were : 

26 Martha Ellen Lewis, born in Osceola, Missouri, 
8 Feb., 1844. 

Martha Ellen Lewis, married, 26 Aug., 1869, Henry 
Waite Douglass. Children : 
27 Ralph Douglass, born 29 Oct., 1870. Died 

31 July, 1872. 
27 Lawrence Lewis Douglass, born 24 Jan.^ 
1873. Died 30 July, 1874. 



WASHINGTON. 207 

27 Nellie Douglass, born 7 Nov., 1874. 
Married, second, at Lewisburg, Virginia, by Dr. Mc- 

Elhenney, 4 Mar., 1853, to Mary Emma, daughter 

of Johnson (and Elizabeth) Reynolds. 
Children of Dr. Lawrence Lewis, by second wife : 

26 Lawrence Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 15 
Dec, 1853. Died 30 Mar., 1858. 

26 Bettie Blain Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 17 
Sept., 1855. 

26 Howell Reynolds Lewis, born at Osceola, Mis- 
souri, 27 Jan., 1857. Died 31 Oct., 1858. 

26 Edwin Lilley Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 
I Apr., 1859. 

26 Samuel Reynolds Lewis, born at Osceola, Mis- 
souri, 31 Oct., i860. 

26 Emma Johnson Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 
5 Mar., 1862. 

26 Lawrence Henry Lewis, born at Osceola, Mis- 
souri, 13 May, 1864. 

26 Kate Hendry Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 25 
Nov., 1866. 

26 Lelia Vernon Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 2 
Dec, 1868. 

26 Maria Hamner Lewis, born at Osceola, Missouri, 
26 Aug., 1871, 

25 Henry Dangerfield Lewis, eleventh child of Howell 
Lewis, was born at Richmond, Virginia, 14 Jan., 1815. 
Died, 1855. 

25 Samuel Lewis, first child of Major George Fielding 
Lewis, second of Mrs. Betty Washington Lewis, sixth of 
Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of 
Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia; was 

born at , about 1790, Married Atway Miller. 

Children : 



ao8 WASHINGTON. 

26 George Washington Lewis, born at , about 

1815. Married his cousin, daughter of Dangerfield 
LcAvis. 

26 Henry Howell Lewis, born at , about 1818. 

Married Rebecca, daughter of Colonel John Taylor, 
of Mount Airy, Virginia. 

26 Catharine Lewis, born at , about 1820. Mar- 
ried her cousin, Fielding, son of Dangerfield Lewis. 

25 Dangerfield Lewis, second child of Major George 

Fielding Lewis, was born at , about 1795. Married 

Miss Pratt. 

26 Fielding Lewis, born at , about . Mar- 
ried his cousin, Catharine, daughter of Samuel Lewis. 

26 Daughter, born at , about . Married her 

cousin George, son of Samuel Lewis. 

25 Polly Lewis, third child of Major George Fielding 
Lewis, was born at . about 1800. 

25 John Thornton Augustine Washington, first child of 
Thornton, first of Col. Samuel, by second wife, third of 
Augustine, by second wife, second of Laurence, first of 
Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, was born in Berkeley county, Virginia (now Jeffer- 
son county, West Virginia), 20 May, 1783. Died 9 Oct., 
1841, at Cedar Lawn. He was married at Shepherds- 
town, West Virginia, 2 Sept., 1810, to Elizabeth Conrad, 
daughter of Major Daniel Bedinger, of Shepherdstown, 
West Virginia. She died about 1835. Major Bedinger 
was' an officer in the Revolutionary War. His second 
Avife was Sarah, daughter of Hon. Robert Rutherfoi'd, 
M. C. Married about 1836. She was born 27 Sept., 
1793. Died 21 Oct., 1837, at Cedar Lawn, West Vir- 
ginia. • Children by first wife : 

26 Lawrence Berry Washington, born at Cedar 



WA SHING TON. 209 

Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 26 Nov., 

1811. Died — Sept., 1856. 
26 Daniel Bedinger Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 8 Feb., 1814. 
26 Virginia Thornton Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county. West Virginia, 2 Mar., 1816. 
26 Sally Eleanor Washington, born at Cedar Lawn, 

Jefferson county. West Virginia, 7 Apr., 1818. 
26 Benjamin F. Washington, born at Cedar Lawn, 

Jefferson county, West Virginia, 7 Apr., 1820. 
26 Georgiana Augusta Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county. West Virginia, 3 Mar., 1822. 
26 Mary Elizabeth Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 4 Mar., 

1824. 
26 John Thornton Augustine Washington, born at 

Cedar Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 22 

Jan., 1826. 
26 Mildred Berry Washington, born at Cedar Lawn, 

Jefferson county, West Virginia, 3 Sept., 1827. Died 

12 Sept., 1827. 
26 Mildred Berry Washington, born at Cedar Lawn, 

Jefferson county, West Virginia, 8 Mar., 1829. Died. 
26 George Washington, born at Cedar Lawn, Jeffer- 
son county, West Virginia, 9 Dec, 1830. 
26 Susan Ellsworth Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, i Apr., 1833. 
26 Henrietta Gray Washington, born at Cedar 

Lawn, Jefferson county. West Virginia, 30 Sept., 

1835. Died 18 Dec, 1838. 

25 George Washington, first child of George Steptoe 
Washington, fourth of Colonel Samuel Washington, 
sixth of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
fifth of Leonard, first of Laurence, first of Laurence, first 
14 



2IO WASHINGTON. 

.' of Laurence, first of Thomas, first of Robert, first of John, 
first of Robert, first of John, first of John, first of John, 
second of Robert, second of Robert, first of Robert, first 
of Walter, fourth of Bondo, second of Akaris, first of 
Bardolf, second of Torfin the Dane ; was born at Hare- 
wood, Jefferson county, Virginia, about 1797. Died 
infant. 

25 Dr. Samuel Walter Washington, second child of 
George Steptoe Washington, was born at Harewood, 
Jefferson county. Virginia, about 1799. Died there in 
1831. Married at Philadelphia, about 1822, to Louisa, 
daughter of Thomas G. Clemsen, of Philadelphia. Mrs. 
Louisa Washington. Widow now (1876) at Claymont, 
Delaware. Children : 

26 Lucy Elizabeth Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 4 July, 1824, 
26 George La Fayette Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 12 Jan., 1825. 
26 Christine Maria Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 17 Dec, 1827. 
26 Annie Steptoe Clemson- Washington, born at 
Harewood, Virginia, in Sept., 1831. 

25 William Temple Washington, third child of George 
Steptoe Washington, was born at Harewood, Jefferson 
county. West Virginia, 16 July, 1800. Removed to Meg- 
willie, April, 1856, a portion of the Harewood estate.- 
Thence to Falmouth, Stafford county, Virginia, about 
1857. Now (1876) there. Married by Rev. Mr. Chap- 
man, in Lexington, Kentucky, A. D. 1821, to Margaret, 
daughter of General Thomas Fletcher, of Bath county, 
Kentucky. She died in Falmouth, 9 Jan., 1865. Chil- 
dren : 

26 Lucy Washington, born in Lexington, Kentucky, 
8 Oct., 1822. Died, 12 Oct., 1822. 



WASHINGTON. 2n 

26 MiLLiCENT Washington, born in Bath county, Ken- 
tucky, 4 Aug., 1824. 

26 AVii.LiAM Washington, born in Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, 7 Jan., 1827. 

26 Thomas Washington, born in Maysville, Virginia, 
17 Mar., 1829. Died in Missouri, 12 April, 1849. 

26 Jane Washington, born in Maysville, Virginia, 27 
June, 1834. 

26 Eugenia Washington, born in Maysville, Virginia, 
24 June, 1840. 

26 Ferdinand Steptoe Washington, born in Mays- 
ville, Virginia, 22 Jan., 1843. 

25 George Steptoe Washington, fourth child of George 
Steptoe Washington, was born at Harewood, now Jeffer- 
son county. West Virginia, 15 Oct., 1806. Removed to 
Belvidere, a portion of the Harewood estate. Died there, 
I Oct., 1 83 1. Married at Frankfort, Kentucky, about 
1827, to Augusta Hawkins, of Frankfort, Kentucky. No 
children. The wife is now (1876) Mrs. Tarleton, and 
resides in Louisiana. 

25 Robert Wood Washington, first child of Laurence 
Augustine Wasliington, fifth of Samuel, seventh of 
Augustine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of 
Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was 
born at Winchester, Frederick county, Virginia, A. D. 
1808. Died at Wheeling, Virginia, A. D. 1843. 

25 Emma Tell Washington, second child of Laurence 
Augustine Washington, was born at Winchester, Fred- 
erick county, Virginia, A. D. 181 1. Died at Wheeling, 
Virginia, A. D. 1838. 

25 Dr. Lawrence Augustine Washington, third child of 
Laurence Augustine Washington, was born in Winchester, 



212 WASHINGTON. 

Frederick county, Virginia, 5 Dec, 1813. Removed to 
Texas, A. D. 1850. To Colorado, and then, A. D. 1872, 
to Dennison City, Texas. Now (1877) there. Married in 
Kanawha county, Virginia, by Rev. Mr. Martin, 29 Nov., 
1839, to Martha Dickinson, daughter of John (and Julia) 
Shrewsbury, of Charlestown, Kanawha county, Virginia. 
Children : 

26 Lawrence Augustine Washington, born in Fred- 
erick county, Virginia, 21 Mar., 1841. Died at Den- 
nison City, Texas, 20 Aug., 1852. 
26 Walter Good Washington, born in Frederick 

county, Virginia, 21 Feb., 1843. 
26 John Shrewsbury Washington, born in Frederick 

county, Virginia, 27 Apr., 1845. 
26 James Turner Washington, born in Frederick 

county, Virginia, 3 Mar., 1847. 
26 Emma Tell Washington, born in Frederick coun- 
ty, Virginia, 27 Sept., 1849. 
26 Julia Wood Washington, born in Texas, 29 May, 

1850. 
26 Cecil Wood Washington, born in Colorado, i 
June, 1858. 

25 Mary Dorcas Washington, fourth child of Laurence 
Augustine Washington, was born at Winchester, Frede- 
rick county, Virginia, A. D. 1815. Died in Colorado, 
15 Nov., 1861. 

25 Eliza Parks, first child of Harriet Parks, sixth of CoL 
Samuel Washington, seventh of Augustine, second of 
Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, A. D. 1797. Died at Maiden, West Virginia, 1852. 

25 Lawrence Augustine Parks, second child of Harriet 



WASfllNGTON. 213 

Parks, was born at Baltimore, Maryland, A. D. 1801, 
Died at Kanawha Salines, West Virginia, 1822. 

25 BusHROD Parks, third child of Harriet Parks, was born 
at Baltimore, Maryland, A. D. 1806. Died in Louisiana, 
A. D. 1832. 

25 Laura Parks, fourth child of Harriet Parks, was born 
at Baltimore, Maryland, 15 Nov., 1809. Removed to 
Kanawha Salines, A. D. 1818. To Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 1864. Now (1877) there. Married, 1828, at Kan- 
awha Salines, by Rev. N. W. Calhoun, to Samuel, son of 
John (and Martha Dickinson) Shrewsbury, of Kanawha 
county. West Virginia. He died at Charlestown, 24 
Mar., 1865. Children : 

26 Martha Dickinson Shrewsbury, born at Shrews- 
bury, Kanawha county, West Virginia, 3 Feb., 1828. 
26 Laurence Washington Shrewsbury, born at 
Shrewsbury, Kanawha county. West Virginia, 11 
Oct., 1 83 1. 
26 Albert Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, Kanawha 

county. West Virginia, A. D. 1833. Died. 
26 Andrew Parks Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, 

Kanawha county. West Virginia, 6 July, 1836. 
26 Harriet Washington Shrewsbury, born at Shrews- 
bury, Kanawha county. West Virginia, 15 May, 
1840. Died I Jan.. 1876. 
26 Cornelia Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, Kan- 
awha county. West Virginia, 4 Apr., 1842. 
26 Laura Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, Kanawha 

county. West Virginia, 16 Apr., 1844. 
26 Samuel Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, Kan- 
awha county. West Virginia, 27 Nov., 1847. 
26 Henry Shrewsbury, born at Shrewsbury, Kanawha 
county, West Virginia, 12 Oct., 1853. 



214 WA SUING TON. 

25 Major Andrew Parks, fifth child of Harriet Parks, 
was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 181 1. Removed to 
CharlcsLOwn, KaAawha Salines, 1818. Died at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 27 June, 1863. Married at Charles- 
town, by Dr. James Brown, A. D. 1842, to Margaret, 
daughter of John (and Margaret) Creed, of Lancaster, 
Ohio. She died at Charlestown, West Virginia, 9 June, 
1866. Children : 

26 Creed Parks, born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 

about 1843. 
26 Bushrod Washington Parks, born at Charlestown, 

West Virginia, about 1845. 
26 Harriot Parks, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 27 Oct., 1848. Married Theodoi'e Talmadge, 
of Columbus, Ohio. 
26 Andrew Parks, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 27 Oct., 1852. 

25 Mary Parks, sixth child of Harriet Parks, was born at 
Baltimore, Maryland, about 18-13. Died at Clifton, West 
Virginia. Married at , about , to Milton Hans- 
ford, of . 

25 Dr. John Parks, seventh child of Harriet Parks, was 
born at Baltimore, Maryland, A. D. 1816. Removed A. 
D. 1818, and now (1877) at Kanawha Salines, Kanawha 
county, West Virginia. Married at Kanawha Salines, 
Dec, 1845, by Rev. Stuart Robinson, Lucy M., daughter 
of Robert N. (and Maria C.) Anderson, of Kanawha 
Salines. Children : 

26 Aluert Washington Parks, born at Kanawha 

Salines, 14 May, 1853. 
26 Laura Shelton Parks, born at Kanawha Salines, 

27 Oct., 1855. Died, Oct., 1862. 
26 Anna Wall Parks, born at Kanawha Salines, 21 
Aug., 1859. 



WASHINGTON. 215 

25 Richard Henry Lee Washington, first child of Cor- 
bin, fourth of John Augustine, seventh of Augustine, 
second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, Eng- 
land, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Walnut 
Farm, Westmoreland county, Virginia, A. D. 1787. Re- 
moved to Selby, Fairfax county, and died at Prospect 
Hill, Jefferson county. Virginia, about 1819. Not mar- 
ried. 

25 BusHROD CoRBiN WASHINGTON, sccoud child of Corbin, 
was born at Walnut Farm, Westmoreland county, Vir- 
ginia, Fall of 1790. Removed to Claymont, Jefferson 
county. West Virginia, and died there, 28 July, 185 1. 
Married, first, in Prince William county, Virginia, about 
1810, to Anna Maria (died at Duffield, Virginia, 24 Nov., 
1850), second daughter of Major Richard Scott Black- 
burn, of United States Army. Two children : 

26 Hannah Lee Washington, born at Rippon Lodge, 
Prince William county, Virginia, 19 May, 181 1. Mar- 
ried William P. Alexander. Now (1877) a widow, 
at Duffield, Jefferson county, Virginia. Had three 
children. 
26 Thomas Blackburn Washington, born at Rippon 
Lodge, Prince William county, Virginia, about 1813. 
Wife died in 1833. Married, second, in 1835, at Leesburg, 
Loudon county, Virginia, in 1835, to Maria Powell, daugh- 
ter of Matthew Harrison, of Loudon county, Virginia. No 
issue. 

25 John Augustine Washington, third child of Corbin, 
was born at Walnut Farm, Westmoreland county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1792. He removed to, and died at Mount 
Vernon, Virginia, in June, 1832. He was married at 

, A. D. 1814, to Jane Charlotte, daughter of Major 

Richard Scott Blackburn, of United States Army. Chil- 
dren : 



2i6 ' WASHINGTON. 

26 George Washington, born at Blakeley, West Vir» 
ginia, about 1815. Died young. 

26 Ann Maria Washington, born at Blakeley, West 
Virginia, A. D. 1817. Died, 29 Mar., 1850. 

26 John Augustine Washington, born at Blakeley^ 
West Virginia, 3 May, 1821. 

26 Richard Blackburn Washington, born at Blake- 
ley, West Virginia, 12 Nov., 1822. 

26 Daughter. Died young. 
Widow died at Blakeley, Jefferson county, West Vir- 
ginia, in Aug., 1856. 

25 Mary Lee Washington, fourth child of Corbin, was 
born at Walnut Farm, Westmoreland county, Virginia, 
about 1797. Removed about , to Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia, and died at Blakeley, Jefferson county. West Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1827. Married at Mount Vernon about 1819, 
to Noblet Herbert, of Alexandria, Virginia. He died 
there. Children : 

26 BusHROD Washington Herbert, born at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, about 1820. Now (1877) living at 
Prospect Hill, near Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Not married. 
26 Robert Herbert, born at Alexandria, Virginia, 

about 1822. Died. 
26 Noblet Herbert, born at Alexandria, Virginia, 
about 1825. Died. 

25 Jane Washington, fifth child of Corbin, was born at 
Walnut Farm, Westmoreland county, Virginia, about 
1800. 

25 Anna Maria Washington, second child (first child, 
George Frederick, died infant), of Col. George Augus- 
tine, first of Col. Charles, fifth of Aligustine, by second 
wife, second of Laurence, first of Col. John of Warton, 



WASHINGTON. 217 

England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at 

, 3 Apr., 1788. Married at , about 1810, 

Captain Reuben Thornton. Children : 

26 Churchill Jones Thornton, born at , about 

1812. 

26 Charles Augustjne Thornton, born at — ■■ , 

about 1815. 
Their descendants are in the South. 

25 George Fayette Washington, third child of Col. 

George Augustine, was born at , 17 Jan., 1790. 

Died at Waverly, Virginia, in Sept., 1867. Married at 
Charlestown, West Virginia, 18 N'ov., 1813, to Maria, 
daughter of Mathew (and Massey) Traner, of Charles- 
town. She died at Waverly, about i860. Children : 
26 Mathew Harwell Bassett Washington, born at 
Charlestown, West Virginia, 15 Aug., 1810. Died at 
Waverly, Virginia, i Aug., 1868. 

26 . Died young. 

26 Charles Augustine Washington, born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 9 Aug., 1814. Died at George- 
town, D. C, A. D. 1861. 
26 Francis Massey Washington, born at Charlestown, 

West Virginia, 21 Jan., 1816. 
26 George Fayette Washington, born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 21 Feb., 1823. Died at Waverly, 
Virginia, about 1853. 
" George Fayette Washington spent part of his life at 
Mount Vernon. Was educated at Williamsburgh, Vir- 
ginia. Lived a while at Wellington, below Alexandria. 
Removed to Frederick county, thence to Waverly, six miles 
from Winchester." 

25 Charles Augustine Washington, fourth child of Col. 

George Augustine, was born at , about 1795. 

" He fell into bad health, and his brother George Fayette 



2i8 WASHINGTON. 

went abroad with him, hoping that a sea voyage would be 
beneficial, but their hopes were vain, as Charles died at 
Cadiz," A. D. . 

25 Fayette Ball, first child of Frances Washington, third 
of Col. Charles, fifth of Augustine, by second wife, sec- 
ond of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, 

and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at , about 

1790. He died about 1835. Married, about t8ii, Mary 
Maria, daughter of George Thompson Mason, of Fairfax 
county, Virginia. One son : 

26 George Washington Ball, born at -, about 

181 2. Married Miss Randolph, daughter of Col. 

Randolph, of Fauquier county, and resides (1877) 

in Loudon county, Virginia. 

25 Charles Ball, second child of Frances Washington, 

was born at , about 1792. Lived in Loudon county, 

Virginia. Married Miss Potter. Had issue. 

25 Mildred Ball, third child of Frances Washington, was 

born at , about 1795. Married William Thorner. 

Had issue. 

25 Frances Ball, fourth child of Frances Washington, 
was born at , about 1797. 

25 Martha Ball, fifth child of Frances Washington, was 
born at , about 1800. Married John C. Gibson. 

26 Lewis William Washington, first child of George Cor- 
bin Washington, sixth of William Augustine, third of 
Augustine, second of Augustine, second of Laurence, 
first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born at Georgetown, D. C, 30 
Nov., 1812. Removed to Jefferson county. West Vir- 
ginia. Died there, i Oct., 187 1. Married at Baltimore, 



WA SHING TON. 2 1 9 

Maryland, by Rev. Dr. Wyatt, 17 Nov., 1836, to Mary 
Ann, daughter of James (and Mary Ann Crockett) Bar- 
roll, of Baltimore, Maryland. Children : 

27 George Corbin Washington, born at Baltimore, 

Maryland, Mar., 1837. Died 30 Sept., 1843. 
27 James Barroll Washington, born at Baltimore, 

Maryland, 26 Aug., 1839. 
27 Mary Ann Washington, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, I June, 1839. 
27 Eliza Ridgeley Washington, born in Jefferson 
county, West Virginia, 16 Nov., 1844. 
Children by second wife : 

27 Betty Lewis Washington, born in Jeffercon 
county. West Virginia, 26 Aug., 1861. Died 25 July, 
1862. 
27 William de Hertburn Washington, born in Jeffer- 
son county. West Virginia, 29 Jan., 1863. 
Wife died in Jefferson county. West Virginia, 16 Nov., 
1844. Married, second, at Clover Lea, Hanover county, 
Virginia, by Rev. G. S. Carraway, 6 Nov., i860, to Ella 
Bassett, daughter of George Washington (and Betty Bur- 
nett) Bassett, of Clover Lea. Two children above. Mrs, 
Ella Bassett Washington, now (1876) resides at Charles- 
t'own. West Virginia. 

26 Eleanor Washington, second child of George Corbin 
Washington, was born at Georgetown, D. C, about 1814^ 
and died about 1834, aged 20 years. Unmarried. 

26 George Corbin Washington, third child of George 
Corbin Washington, was born at Georgetown, D. C, 
about 1816. Died at Georgetown, D. C, in July, 1854. 
Was buried at Oak Hill, near there. 

26 Mary Snickers, first child of Fanny Washington, third 
child of Warner, first of Warner, first of Warner, first of 
John, first of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, 



2 20 WASHINGTON. 

England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at 
Claymont, in Clarke county, Virginia, about 1795. Dead. 

26 William Snickers, second child of Fanny Washington, 
was born at Claymont, in Clarke county, Virginia, about 
1798. Unmarried. Dead. 

26 Emily Snickers, third child of Fanny Washington, was 
born at Claymont, in Clarke county, Virginia, about 
1800. Unmarried. Dead. 

26 Edward Snickers, fourth child of Fanny Washington, 
was born at Claymont, in Clarke county, Virginia, about 
1804. Unmarried. Dead. 

26 Elizabeth Snickers, fifth child of Fanny Washington, 
was born at Claymont, in Clarke county, Virginia, 15 
Oct., 1806. Removed to Baltimore, Maryland, 1835. 
Now (1877) there. Married at Martinsburgh, West Vir- 
ginia, by Rev. Mr. Johnson, 17 Feb., 1835, to Charles H. 
H. Browne, of Westmoreland county, Virginia, son of 
William (and Sarah Hammond) Browne, of Westmore- 
land, Virginia. Seven children : 

27 Henry Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 23 

Apr., 1836. Died 13 Feb., 1839. 
27 William Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 10 

July, 1838. Died 5 May, 1866. 
27 Charles Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 10 

Nov., 1839. Died i Jan., i860. 
27 Frederick Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 

15 Nov., 1841. 
27 Frank Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 2t 

Dec, 1843. 
27 Albert Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 30 

Nov., 1845. 
27 Fanny Browne, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 7 
Feb., 1849. 



WASHINGTON. 221 

26 Beverly Snickers, sixth child of Fanny Washington, 
was born at Claymont, Clarke county, Virginia, about 
1808. Died unmarried. 

26 Henry Augustine Washington, first child of Sarah 
Tayloe Washington, eighth of William Augustine, third 
of Augustine, second of Augustine, second of Laurence, 
first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born at Haywood, Virginia, 24 
Aug., 1820. Died at Washington, D. C, 28 Feb., 1858. 
He was educated at Princeton, New Jersey. Removed 
to Williamsburgh, Virginia. Was Professor of William 
and Mary's College. Married at Williamsburgh, by 
Rev. Mr. Wilmer, 8 July, 1852, to Cynthia B., daughter 
■of Hon. Nathaniel Beverly (and Lucy Ann) Tucker, of 
Williamsburgh. Professor of Moral Philosophy and 
Political Economy, of William and Mary's College. 
Children : 

27 Lucy B. Washington, born at Williamsburgh, Vir- 
ginia, 22 July, 1854. Died 30 July, 1854. 

27 Sarah Tayloe Washington, born at Williams- 
burgh, Virginia, 26 Dec, 1856. Died i Oct., 1862. 

26 John Tayloe Washington, second child of Sarah Tay- 
loe Washington, was born at Blenheim, Westmoreland 
county, Virginia, 20 I)ec., 1822. Died at Albion, King 
George's county, Virginia, 18 May, 1854. Married at 
Washington, D. C, 10 June, 1850, to Mary D., daughter 
of George D. (and Roberta) Ashton, of King George's 
-county, Virginia. Children : • 

27 Sarah Tayloe Washington, born at Albion, King 
George's county, Virginia, 4 May, 185 1. Died 5 
Apr., 1857. 
27 John Washington, born at Albion, King George's 

county, Virginia, 9 Aug.. 1852. 
3.1 Mary Ashton Washington, born at Albion, King 
George's county, Virginia, 12 June, 1858. 



2 22 WASHINGTON. 

27 Richard Henry Washington, born at Albion, King 
George's county, Virginia, 22 Mar., 1863. 

26 George Washington, third child of Sarah Tayloe 
Washington, was born at Cedar Hill, Virginia, 24 July, 
1825. Removed to Alexandria, Virginia. Now (1877) 
there. Married at Warrenton, Virginia, i Dec, 1852, to 
Sallie, daughter of J. W. Massie, of Alexandria, Vir- 
ginia. Children : 

27 Orlando Fairfax Washington, born at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, 18 Nov., 1853. Died Oct., 1857. 
27 Henry Augustine Washington, born at Alex- 
andria, Virginia, 29 Sept., 1856. 
27 Effie Washington, born at Alexandria, Virginia, 

17 Dec, 1858. Died 24 Dec, 1858. 
27 George Washington, born at Warrenton, Virginia,. 

28 May, 1861. 
27 Clarence Edgar Washington, born at Alexandria, 

Virginia, 23 June, 1868. 
27 Mary Stuart Washington, born at Alexandria, 

Virginia, 19 July, 1871. 
27 Laurence R. Washington, born at Alexandrizl, 
Virginia, 14 Sept., 1873. 

26 Richard Bushrod Washington, fourth child of Sarah 
Tayloe Washington, was born at Blenheim, Virginia, 21 
June, 1827. Removed to Hastings, Minnesota. Died at 
Hagerstown, Maryland, 6 July, 1863. Married at Hast- 
ings, Minnesota, 28 Juna, 1859, to Ellen, daughter of 

Center, of Hastings, Minnesota, Children : 

27 Laurence Gibson Washington, born at Hastings, 

Minnesota, 2 June, i860. 
27 Mary Whaley Washington, born at Hastings^ 
Minnesota, 5 Aug., 1862. 

26 Mary West Washington, fifth child of Sarah T. Wash- 



WASHINGTON. 223 

ington, was born at Blenheim, Virginia, 13 Oct., 1828. 
Now (1877) there, or at Haywood, or Campbelltown. 
Married at Blenheim, Virginia, by Rev. William Chesley, 
19 Dec, 1856, to Dr. Walker, son of William Fetner 
Washington, of Clifton, Caroline county, Virginia. 
Children : 

27 Laurence Augustine Washington, born at Clif- 
ton, Virginia, 9 Nov., 1857. 
27 Walker Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 23 

Oct., i860. 
27 Richard Washington, born at Campbelltown, Vir- 
ginia, I Nov., 1862. 
27 Anna Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 25 

Dec, 1865. Died 4 Feb., 1867. 
27 Bessie Washington, born at Clifton, Virginia, 7 
June, 1869. Died 8 Aug., 1870. 

26 Sarah Ashton Washington, sixth child of Sarah Tay- 
loe Washington, was born at Campbelltown, Westmore- 
land county, Virginia, 17 Aug., 183 1, and died there, 2 
Jan., 1832. 

26 William Augustine Washington, seventh child of 
Sarah Tayloe Washington, was born at Blenheim, Vir- 
ginia, 5 Mar., 1833. Removed about 1859 to Florence, 
South Carolina. To Merced City, California, 1870. Now 
(1877) there. Married at Florence, South Carolina, 19 
Sept., i860, to Sallie A., daughter of James, of Flor- 
ence, South Carolina. Children : 

27 Infant, born at Florence, South Carolina, about 

1861. Died infant. 
27 Julia J. Washington, born at Florence, South Car- 
olina, II July, 1862. 
27 Mary E. Washington, born at Florence, South Car- 
olina, 13 Oct., 1866. Died 18 Apr., 187 1. 
27 Edith H. Washington, born at Campbelltown, Vir- 
ginia, 30 Sept., 1868. Died 30 July, 1869. 



2 24 IVASHIA^GTON. 

27 William Augustine Washington, born at Balti- 
more, Maryland, 13 Oct., 1870. 

27 Emma Ethel Washington, born at Merced City, 
California, 5 Sept., 1875. 

26 Laurence Washington, eighth child of Sarah Tayloe 
Washington, was born at Campbelltown, Virginia, i May, 
1836. Not married. 

26 Elizabeth Washington, ninth child of Sarah Tayloe 
Washington, was born at Blenheim, Virginia, 23 Nov., 
1838. Removed to Wakefield, Virginia. Now (1877) 
there. Married at Campbelltown, Virginia, by Rev. Wil- 
liam Chesley, 22 Oct., 1856, to John E. Wilson, son of 
John T. Wilson, of Anne Arundel county, Maryland, 
Children : 

27 Susan Wilson, born at Campbelltown, Virginia, 9 

Sept., 1857. 
27 Henrietta Wilson, born at West Wakefield, Vir- 
ginia, 26 Mar., 1859. 
57 John F. Wilson, born at Campbelltown, Virginia, 

19 Aug., i860. 
27 William Wilson, born at West Wakefield, Vir- 
ginia, 8 Feb., 1862. 
27 Lawrence W. Wilson, born at West Wakefield, Vir- 
ginia, 28 May, 1866. 
27 Sarah Tayloe Wilson, born at West Wakefield, 

Virginia, 5 Nov., 1867. Died 26 Aug., 1868. 
27 George Wilson, born at West Wakefield, Virginia, 
27 Jan., 1874. Died 8 Sept., 1875. 

26 Robert James Washington, tenth child of Sarah Tay- 
loe Washington, was born at Campbelltown, Virginia, 16 
■Sept., 1841. Now (1877) there. Married at Wirtland, 
Virginia, 30 Oct., 1867, to Bessie Pa)'ne, daughter of 
Dr. William Wirt, of Wirtland, Virginia. Children : 



WASHINGTON. -225 

27 Selina Payne Washington, born at Wirtland, Vir- 
ginia, 16 Apr., 1870. 

27 Robert Wirt Washington, born at Wirtland, Vir- 
ginia, 25 Feb., 1872. 

27 Henry Tayloe Washington, born at Campbell- 
town, Virginia, 27 Dec, 1874. 

27 William Dabney Washington, born at Campbell- 
town, Virginia, 14 Jan., 1876. 

27 Fannie Wirt Washington, born at Campbelltown, 
Virginia, 28 Feb., 1877. 

26 Lloyd Washington, eleventh child of Sarah Tayloe 
Washington, was born at Blenheim, 2 Nov., 1846. Re- 
moved in Dec, 1866, to Chicago, Illinois. Now (1877) 
there. Not married. 

26 Daniel George Tucker, first child of Maria Ball 
Tucker, third of Mrs. Betty Lewis Carter, first of Mrs. 
Betty Washington Lewis, second of Augustine Washing- 
ton, by second wife, second of Laurence, first of Col. 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
was born at , 20 Nov., 1802. 

26 Eleanor Rosalie Tucker, second child of Maria Ball 

Tucker, was born at , 8 May, 1804. Died Oct., 

1818. 

26 Maria Farley Tucker, third child of Maria Ball 

Tucker, was born at , 6 Nov., 1805. Married 

Rives, of . 

26 Eliza Lewis Tucker, fourth child of Maria Ball Tucker, 
was born at , 9 Dec, 1808. 

26 Mary Lelia Tucker, fifth child of Maria Ball Tucker, 
was born at , 5 Aug., 1810. Died 28 July, 1817. 

26 Ellen Eliza Lewis, first child of George Richard Lewis, 
15 



226 WA SHJNG TON. 

third child of Howell Lewis, fourth of Mrs. Betty Wash- 
ington Lewis, second of Augustine, by second wife, 
second of Laurence, first of John, of Warton, England, 
and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Morgans- 
field, Kentucky, i8 July, 1834. Removed about , to 

Marietta, Ohio. Now (1876) there. Married at Baltimore, 
Maryland, 9 Oct., 1856, to Anselm Tupper Nye, son of 
Anselm Tupper Nye, of Baltimore. Children : 

27 George Lewis Nye, born at , 27 July, 1857. 

27 Harold Bayless Nye, born at , 3 Feb., 1859. 

27 Anselm Tupper " " " 27 Sept., i860. 

29 Ellen Lewis " " " 22 Nov., 1863. 

26 Jeannette Lewis, second child of George Richard 
Lewis, was born at Morgansfield, Kentucky, 2 July, 1837. 
Died — Dec, 1843. 

26 Harold Lewis, third child of George Richard Lewis, 
was born at Morgansfield, Kentucky, 14 Aug., 1839. 
Died at , 1863. 

26 George Lewis, fourth child of George Richard Lewis, 
was born at Morgansfield, Kentucky, 14 Sept., 1842. 

26 Alfred Lovell, first child of Betty Washington Lewis, 
first of Howell Lewis, fourth of Betty Lewis, second of 
Augustine Washington, by second wife, second of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 27 Dec, 1818. He died at Marietta, Ohio, 6 
Sept., 1842. Not married. 

26 Richard Channing Moore Lovell, second child of Betty 
Washington Lewis, was born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 3 Mar., 1822. Removed about , to Covington, 

Kentucky. Married at Charlestown, West Virginia, about 



WASHINGTON. 227 

, to Sallie, daughter of Patrick, of Charlestown, 

West Virginia. 

26 Howell Lewis Lovell, third child of Betty Washing- 
ton Lewis, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 9 
July, 1824. Removed about , to Covington, Ken- 
tucky. Now (1877) there. 

26 Joseph Lovell, fourth child of Betty Washington Lewis, 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 31 Mar., 1827. 
Removed about , to Nashville, Tennessee. To Mari- 
etta, Ohio, where he died, 22 Mar., 1865. Married at 
Marietta, Ohio, 15 Nov., 1852, to Sarah Sophia, daughter 
of Anselm Tupper (and Rebecca Dodge Cram) Nye, of 
Marietta, Ohio. Widow, now (1877) at Marietta, Ohio. 
One child : 

27 Betty Washington Lovell, born at Marietta, Ohio, 
13 Oct., 1853. Married 12 Jan., 1876, to Francis Fox 
Oldham. 

26 Betty Lovell, fifth child of Betty Washington Lewis, 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, about 1829. 
Married Charles Carter. 

26 Fayette Augustine Lovell, sixth child of Betty Wash- 
ington Lewis, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 
about 1832, and died there. Widow, Mrs. Sally S. Lovell, 
now (1877) there. 

26 William Steele, Lawyer, first child of Ellen Jael 
Steele, second of Howell Lewis, fourth of Betty Lewis, 
second of Augustine Washington, by second wife, second 
of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 12 Dec, 1819. He settled, first, at Calhoun, Mis- 
souri, a lawyer. Removed to Windsor, Missouri, where 



2 28 WASHINGTON. 

he died, 7 Oct., 1872. He was married at , to 

Fanny, daughter of Delany, of . Chil- 
dren : 

27 R(;BERT Fleming Steele, born at , 23 Sept., 

1846. 
27 Fanny Maria Steele, born at , 2 Nov., 1848. 

Died 19 Mar., 1873. 
27 Joseph Perkins Steele, born at , 3 Dec, 

1850. 
27 Louise Steele, born at , 28 Mar., 1853. Died 

9 Nov., 1872. 

27 William Steele, born at , 24 Apr., 1855. 

27 Ellen Jael Steele, born at , 14 Dec, 1857. 

Died young. 
27 Betty Caldwell Steele, born at , i Mar., 

i860. Died 28 Oct., 1873. 
27 LovELL Steele, born at , 1865. Died 2 Apr., 

1870. 

26 Martha Ellen Steele, second child of Ellen Jael 
Steele, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 5 July, 
1821. Removed in Fall of 1834, to Marietta, Ohio. To 
Cleveland, Ohio, in April, 1852. Now (1876) there. Mar- 
ried at Marietta, Ohio, 25 Oct., 1841, by Rev. Dr. Thomas 
Weeks, to Joseph Perkins, son of General Simon Per- 
kins, of Warren, Ohio. Her children : 

27 Olive Perkins, born at Marietta, Ohio, i Aug., 

1842. Died at Cleveland, Ohio, 26 May, 1853. 
27 Charles Perkins, born at Marietta, Ohio, 10 Feb., 

1844. Died at Cleveland, Ohio, 18 Aug., 1864. 
27 Ellen Steele Perkins, born at Marietta, Ohio, 11 
Dec, 1846. Married Robert L. Chamberlain, and 
died 4 July, 1876. 
27 Douglas Perkins, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 28 
Apr., 1854. Married Emma Keller. 



I WASHINGTON. 229 

27 Joseph Perkins, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 20 Nov 

1858. 

27 Lawrence Lewis Perkins, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 
6 Mar., 1862. 

26 Howell Lewis Steele, third child of Ellen Jael Steele, 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 31 Dec, 1822. 
He died at Ophir, California, 26 Dec, 1850. 

26 Robert McAmey Steele, fourth child of Ellen Jael 
Steele, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 28 Dec, 
1824. Died there, 16 July, 1844. 

26 Betty Washington Steele, fifth child of Ellen Jael 
Steele, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 10 Dec, 
1826. Removed to Marietta, Ohio, in Fall of 1834. To 
Akron, Ohio, in 1849. Now (1876) there. Married at 
Charlestown, West Virginia, by Rev. Mr. Nash, i May. 
1049, to David Leicester King (born 25 Dec, 1825), of 
Akron, Ohio, son of Hon. Leicester (and Julia Ann 
Huntington) King, of Warren, Ohio. Children : 

27 Ellen Lewis King, born at Akron, Ohio, 13 June, 
1850. Married David R. Paige, Jr., of Akron, Ohio 
19 Jan., 1870. 
27 Betty Steele King, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 22 
Dec, 1 85 1. Married John Gilbert Raymond, of 
Akron, Ohio, 10 Dec, 1873. 
27 Howell Steele King, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 5 

May, 1853. 
27 Susan Huntington King, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 

16 Jan., 1855. 
27 Martha Perkins King, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 6 
Apr., 1863. 

26 William Gaston Gwathmey. first child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, fifth of Howell Lewis, fourth of Betty 



230 WASHINGTON. 

"Washington, second of Augustine, by second wife, sec- 
ond of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, 
and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Savannah, 
Georgia, 2 Apr, 1823. Removed to New York, about 
1830, to Mobile, Alabama, in 1836, to Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, in 1840. Died there, 5 Aug., 1852. Married in 
Carolina county, Virginia, Oct., 1846, by Rev. Dr. 

Friend, to Anna Henry Moore, daughter of Moore, 

of . Widow living, 1878. Children : 

27 Elizabeth Tayloe Gwathmey, born at Richmond, 
Virginia, about 1847. 

27 Fanny Fielding Gwathmey, born at Richmond, 
Virginia, about 1850. 

27 Brooke Gwathmey, born at Richmond, Virginia, 
about 1852. Died. 

26 Ellen Jael Gwathmey, second child of Frances Field- 
ing Lewis, was born at Richmond, Virginia, 26 Sept., 
1824, and died at Rockbridge Baths, Virginia, 5 Oct., 
1870. Married in North Carolina, 26 May, 1844, to James 
Kerr Caskie, son of John (and Martha Norvell) Caskie, 
of Richmond, Virginia. He died in Sept., 1868. Chil- 
dren : 

27 Martha Norvell Caskie, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, about 1845. 

26 Humphrey Brooke Gwathmey, third child of Frances 

Fielding Lewis, was born at , 5 June, 1826, and 

died, 5 Nov., 1826. 

26 Matilda Cumming Gwathmey, fourth child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, was born in New York, 6 Jan., 1828. 
Removed to Norfolk, Virginia, in 1832. Mobile, Ala- 
bama, in 1837. To Richmond, Virginia, 1840, to Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, in 1868. Now (1878) there. Married at 
Philadelphia, 12 May, 1852, by Rev. William S. Plumer, 



WASHINGTON. 231 

D.D., to Thomas Verner Moore, son of John (and Rachel) 
Moore, of Newville, Pennsylvania. He died at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, 5 Aug., 1871. Children : 

27 Fanny Brooke Moore, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 15 Apr., T853. 
27 Thomas Verner Moore, born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 24 Nov., 1856. 

26 Virginia Gwathmev, fifth child of Frances Fielding 
Lewis, was born at New York, 31 Dec, 1830. Removed 
to Norfolk, Virginia, in 1831. To Mobile, Alabama, in 
1836, to Richmond, Virginia, in 1840, to Wilmington, 
North Carolina, in 1853. Now (1878) there. Married at 
Richmond, Virginia, 27 Dec, 1853, by Rev. Adam Em- 
pie, to Adam, son of Rev. Adam (and Ann Eliza Wright) 
Empie, of Richmond, Virginia. Husband died at Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, 10 July, 1877. Children : 
27 Swift Miller Emple, born at Wilmington, North 

Carolina, about 1854. 
27 Brooke Gwathmey Empie, born at Wilmington, 

North Carolina, about 1856. 
37 Ann Eliza Empie, born at Wilmington, North Car- 
olina, about 1858. 
37 Fanny Lewis Empie, born at Wilmington, North 

Carolina, about i860. 
27 Virginia Empie, born at Wilmington, North Car- 
olina, about 1862. Died. 
27 Ellen Caskie Empie, born at Wilmington, North 

Carolina, about 1865. 
57 Adam Empie, born at Wilmington, North Carolina, 

about 1867. Died young. 
27 Theodore Francis Empie, born at Wilmington, 

North Carolina, about 1870. 
37 Adam Empie, born at Wilmington, North Carolina^ 
about 1872. 



23-" WASHINGTON. 

2lb Theodore Francis Gwathmey, sixth child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, was born at Norfolk, Virginia, 21 May, 
1832. Removed to Mobile, Alabama, in 1836. To Rich- 
mond, Virginia, in 1840, to New Orleans, in 1848. Now 
(1878) there. Unmarried. 

26 Temple Gwathmey, seventh child of Frances Fielding 
Lewis, was born at Norfolk, Virginia, A. D. 1834. Died 
at , 12 Nov., 1840. 

26 Fanny Brooke Gwathmey, eighth child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, was born at Norfolk, Virginia, 8 Sept., 
1835. Removed to Mobile, in 1836. To Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, in 1840, to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1853. Now 
(1878) there. Married at Richmond, Virginia, 8 Dec, 
1853, by Rev. T. V. Moore, to Andrew, son of George 
(and Elizabeth) Reed, of Scotland (who removed to Nor- 
folk, Virginia, in 1801). Children : 

27 Imogen Reed, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 2 Oct.,, 

1854. 
27 Brooke Gwathmey Reed, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 23 Apr., 1856. Died 19 Jan., 1875. 
27 Fanny Fielding Reed, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 2 June, 1857. Died 8 Aug., 1858. 
27 Harry Fielding Reed, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 18 May, 1859. 
27 Ellen Reed, born at Baltimore. Maryland, 5 June. 

i860. 
27 Andrew Melville Reed, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 16 Aug., 1861. 
27 Fanny Lewis Reed, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 
6 Sept., 1862. 

26 Caroline Heth Gwathmey, ninth child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, was born at Mobile, Alabama, about 1837, 
and died at Richmond, Virginia, 9 May, 1842. 



WA SHING TON. ,233 

26 Mary Ann Gwathmey, tenth child of Frances Fielding 
Lewis, was born at Richmond, Virginia, A. D. 1841. 
Died at Richmond, Virginia, 9 May, 1849. 

26 Emily Carter Gwathmey, eleventh child of Frances 
Fielding Lewis, was born at Richmond, Virginia, A. D. 
1843, and died there, 26 Mar., 1849. 

26 Robert Washington Gwathmey, twelfth child of 
Frances Fielding Lewis, was born at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, 22 June, 1846. Removed to Baltimore, Maryland, 
in 1865. Now (1878) there. 

26 Robert Hereford, first child of Virginia Lewis, sixth 
of Howell Lewis, fourth of Betty Washington, second of 
Augustine, by second wife, second of Laurence, first of 
Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, was born at Buffalo. Mason county, West Virginia, 
17 July, 1827. Now (1877) at Fort Bridger, Wyoming 
Territory. 

26 Rev. Brooke Gwathmey Hereford, second child of 
Virginia Lewis, was born at Buffalo, Mason county, 
West Virginia, 16 Dec, 1829. Removed in 1864, to Gal- 
lia county, Ohio, and in 1869, to Greasy Ridge, Lawrence 
county, Ohio, now (1877) there. Married at Buffalo, 
Mason county, West Virginia, by Rev. Charles Carroll, 
30 Oct., 185 1, to Meriam (born in Mason county. West 
Virginia, in 1832), daughter of Esom (and Elizabeth) 
Hannan, of Mason county. West Virginia. She died at 

, Gallia county, Ohio, 6 Apr.. 1869. Children : 

27 Virginia Frances Hereford, born at Buffalo, 
Mason county, West Virginia, 9 Nov., 1852. Mar- 
ried II Apr., 1872, William Massie. Two children: 
28 Brooke Herschel Massie, born 22 Feb., 1873. 
28 Joseph Oscar Massie, born 3 Nov., 1874. 



234 WASHINGTON, 

27 Ellen Lewis Hereford, born at Buffalo, Mason 
county. West Virginia, 3 Dec, 1854. Married Daniel 
S. Vermillion, 30 Sept., 1874. One child: 

28 Jenny Florence Vermillion, born 8 June, 

1875- 
27 Robert Esom Hereford, born in Henry county, 

Missouri, 8 June, 1857. 
27 Nancy Emma Hereford, born in Buffalo, Mason 

county. West Virginia, i Dec, 1861. 
27 William Carter Hereford, born in Gallia county, 

Ohio, 28 Oct., 1864. 
27 Mary Evel»yn Hereford, born in Gallia county, 
Ohio, 25 Jan., 1869. 
He was married, second, by Rev. John Houck, in Law- 
rence county, Ohio, 16 Oct., 1869, to Mrs. Elizabeth Jane 
Lewis (born 18 Feb., 1833), daughter of Isaac (and Catha- 
rine) Miller, of Lawrence county, Ohio. 

26 Mary Brenaugh Hereford, third child of Virginia 
Lewis, was born at Buffalo, Mason county, West Vir- 
ginia, 25 Jan., 1832. Died 23 Mar., 1836. 

26 Frances Eliza Hereford, fourth child of Virginia 
Lewis, was born at Buffalo, Mason county. West Vir- 
ginia, 4 June, 1834. Removed to Marietta, Ohio. Now 
(1876) there. Married at Cleveland, Ohio, 14 Dec, 1853, 
to John, son of Joseph E. Hall, of Marietta, Ohio. Chil- 
dren : 

27 Alfred Lovell Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 7 

Sept., 1854. 
27 Rhoda Virginia Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 25 

Oct., 1855. 
27 Bertha Cotton Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 26 

Jan., 1857. 
27 Ellen Lewis Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 29 
Oct., i860. 



WASHINGTON. 235 

27 Gertrude Butler Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 

28 Oct., 1867. 
27 John Charles Hall, born at Cleveland, Ohio, 13 

Feb., 1869: 

26 Katherine Ellen Hereford, fifth child of Virginia 
Lewis, was born at Buffalo, West Virginia, about 1836. 
Removed in July, 1853, to Clinton, Henry county, Mis- 
souri. Now (1877) at Clinton. Married in Henry 
county, Missouri, by Rev. Dr. Browning, 10 July, 1853, 
to William H., son of C. H. (and Anna) Schroeder, of St. 
Louis. Children : 

27 William H. Schroeder, born at Clinton, Missouri, 

17 July, 1855. 

27 Mattie a. Schroeder, born at Clinton, Missouri, 

18 June, 1857. 

27 Robert Lee Schroeder, born at Clinton, Missouri, 

23 June, 1859. 
27 Joseph Schroeder, born at St. Louis, Missouri, 21 

Aug., 1862. 
27 Bettie G. Schroeder, born at Jerseyville, Illinois, 

18 Sept., 1865. 

26 Laurence Lewis Hereford, sixth child of Virginia 
Lewis, was born at Buffalo, Mason county, West Vir- 
ginia, about 1838. Now (1877) at Sherman, Texas. He 
was married at Jerseyville, Illinois, by Rev. W. H. Reed, 
16 Apr., 187 1, to Nellie, daughter of J. B. Schroeder. of 
Jerseyville, Illinois. One child : 

27 Inez Fewell Hereford, born at Jerseyville, Illinois, 
31 Jan., 1872. 

26 Betty Stribling Hereford, seventh child of Virginia 
Lewis, was born at Buffalo, Mason county, West Vir- 
ginia, about 1840. 



236 WASHINGTON. 

2.(i George Lewis, first child of Howell Lewis, seventh of 
Howell Lewis, fourth of Mrs. Betty Lewis, sixth of Au- 
gustine Washington, second of Laurence, first of Col. 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Vir- 
ginia, was born at , Mason county, Virginia, 27 

Oct., 1831. Removed in 1852, to California, thence to 
White Spring, Nye county, Nevada. Now (1877) there. 

Married in , Nevada, in 1874, to . Child 

born in 1876. 

26 Mary Ellen Lewis, second child of Howell Lewis, was 

born in , Mason county, Virginia, 28 June, 1834. 

She died in Salem, Illinois. Married in Calhoun, Henry 
county, Missouri, 25 Oct., 1855, by Rev. William Hoag, 
to Robert H. Hogan. One child : 

27 Alice Hogan, born in Calhoun, Missouri, A. D. 
1856. 

26 Augustus D. Lewis, third child of Howell Lewis, was 

born in , Mason county, Virginia, 8 Nov., 1836. 

Died in Henry county, Missouri, 10 Feb., 1853. 

26 Fielding Lewis, fourth child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Calhoun, Missouri, 9 Mar., 1839. Removed to 
Grayson county, Texas. Died 21 Mar., 1863. Married 
near Calhoun, Missouri, 10 Jan., 1861, by Rev. William 
Garrett, to Mary S. Rains. One child : 

27 Lawrence H. Lewis, born near Calhoun, Missouri, 
II Jan., 1862. 

26 Columbia Lewis, fifth child of Howell Lewis, was born 
at Calhoun, Missouri, 24 Sept., 1842. Removed to Lewis^ 
Henry county, Missouri. Now (1877) there. Married 

at , by Rev. L. C. Marvin, D.D., 14 Jan., 1866, to 

Lawrence W., son of John (and Mary) Good, formerly 
of West Virginia. Children : 



WASHING TON. 237 

27 Ida Good, born at Lewis, Missouri, about 1867. 
27 Archie L. Good, born at Lewis, Missouri, about 
1870. 

27 Harry C. Good, born at Lewis, Missouri, about 

1872. 
27 Lawrence B. Good, born at Lewis, Missouri, about 

1875- 

26 Virginia Lewis, sixth child of Howell Lewis, was born 
at Calhoun, Missouri, 11 Mar., 1845. Removed 26 Sept., 
1867, to Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Now (1877) 
at Stringtown, Indian Territory. Married near Calhoun, 
Missouri, by Rev. Mr. Dolby, 10 June, 1867, to C. H. 
Gatewood, son of James M. (and Ann A.) Gatewood, of 
Sherman, Texas. Children : 

27 James Howell Gatewood, born at Boggy Depot, 

Indian Territory, i June, 1868. 
27 Emma Ann Gatewood, born at Stringtown, Indian 

Territory, 12 Jan., 1873. 
27 Mary Franklin Gatewood, born at Stringtown, 
Indian Territory, 5 June, 1875. 

26 Betty F. Lewis, seventh child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Calhoun, Missouri, 28 Sept., 1848. Now (1877) 
resides near Calhoun. Married at Lewis, Missouri, by 
Rev. J. Warder, 26 Jan., 187 1, to Milton D., son of Mark 
(and Eliza) Finks, of Calhoun, Missouri. Children : 
27 Leland Finks, born near Calhoun, Missouri, in 

Jan., 1872. 
27 Emma May, born near Calhoun, Missouri, in June, 
1875- 

26 William Howell Lev/is, eighth child of Howell Lewis, 
was born at Calhoun, Missouri, 26 Jan., 1850. Removed 
to Lewis, Missouri. Now (1877) there. Married at 
Lewis, by Rev. William Lawler, 26 Feb., 1874, to Nettie, 



238 WASHINGTON. 

daughter of George (and Mary) Dean, of . One 

child : 

27 Emma Lewis, born at Lewis, Missouri, 28 Feb., 
1875. 

26 Gaston G. Lewis, ninth child of Howell Lewis, was 
born at Calhoun, Missouri, 28 Jan., 1853. Removed 
Oct., 1875, to White River, Nye county, Nevada. Now 
(1877) there. Unmarried. 

26 Emma A. Lewis, tenth child of Howell Lewis, was born 
at Calhoun, Missouri, 28 Sept., 1855. Removed to Lewis,. 
Missouri. Now (1877) there. Married at Lewis, by Rev. 
Mr. Hudson, 9 Mar., 1876, to Monroe, son of James (and 
Martha) Wiley, of Calhoun, Missouri. No children. 

26 Laurence Berry Washington, first child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, first child of Thornton 
Washington, first of Col. Samuel, by second wife, second 
of Augustine, by second wife, second of Laurence, first 
of Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, was born at Cedar Lawn, Jefferson county, 
West Virginia, 26 Nov., 181 1. Never married. ''He was. 
a lawyer by profession, served as a Lieutenant in a Vir- 
ginia regiment in the Mexican War. Went to California, 
in 1849, thence to Missouri, in 185-. To Virginia, in 
185-, to Missouri, in 1856, where he died on a steamboat, 
on Mississippi River, 21 Sept., 1856. Was an author and 
poet of no mean ability." 

26 Daniel Bedenger Washington, second child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 8 Feb., 1814. 
" Was a farmer by profession, though sometimes editor 
and writer for political newspapers. Removed to Put- 
nam county, West Virginia, in 1846. To Johnson county^ 



WASHINGTON. 239 

Missouri, in 1856. Served in Confederate Army during 
the Civil War. Now (1877) near Index, Cass county, 
Missouri. Married at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, 24 Oct.,. 
1843, to Lucy (she was daughter of Samuel Washington, 
half brother of John T. A. Washington), A. Wharton, 
widow of Dr. John J. Wharton, of Newport, Kentucky. 
Had five children, two sons and three daughters, all alive 
except the eldest, a son." Children : 

27 Samuel Thornton Washington, born at Cedar 
Lawn, West Virginia, 22 Dec, 1844. Died 15 Nov., 
1850. 
27 Kate Townsend Washington, born in Putnam 

county. West Virginia, 11 Sept., 1846. 
27 Elizabeth Bedenger Washington, born in Putnam 

county. West Virginia, 3 Sept., 1848. 
27 Thornton Augustine Washington, born in Put- 
nam county. West Virginia, 23 Apr., 1854. 
27 Marian Wallace Washington, born in Putnam 
county, West Virginia, 17 June, 1856. 

26 Virginia Thornton Washington, third child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 22 May, 1816. 
Died unmarried, 13 Nov., 1838, in Jefferson county, West 
Virginia. 

26 Sally Eleanor Washington, fourth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Jefferson county. West Virginia, 7 Apr., iSiS. 
Removed to Johnson county Missouri, in 1856-7, thence 
to Cass county, Missouri, in 1857, where she died unmar- 
ried, 21 Jan., 1858. 

26 Benjamin Franklin Washington, fifth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Charlestown, Jefferson county, West Virginia, 



^4o WASHINGTON. 

7 Apr., 1820. Removed to San Francisco, California, A. 
D. 1849. Died there 22 Jan., 1872. Married 22 Oct., 
1845, at Charlestown, West Virginia, to Georgianna 
Hite Ransom, daughter of James L. Ransom, of Charles- 
town, Jefferson county. West Virginia. She died in 
Dec, i860, at San Francisco, California. Children : 
27 John Thornton Washington, born at Charlestown, 

West Virginia, 26 July, 1846. 
27 Franklin Bedenger Washington, born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 23 June, 1848. 
27 Fannie Madison Washington, born at San Fran- 
cisco, California, Aug., 1853. Married 18 Apr., 1876, 
to Lieutenant D. Delhanty. 
27 Lillian Washington, born at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, A. D. 1855. Died 1856, at Charlestown, West 
Virginia. 
27 Bertha James Washington, born at San Francisco, 
California, 3 Mar., 1858. 
'' Lawyer and Editor by profession. He emigrated to 
California in 1849. Was elected Recorder and Police Judge 
of Sacramento City, in 1850, and took an active part in 
suppression of ' the squatter riots.' Became part owner 
and Editor-in-Chief of the Deinocratic State Journal, in 
1852. Also edited and partly owned the Times and Tra7is- 
£ript, of San Francisco, in 1853 to 1855. In 1857 was ap- 
pointed Collector of the Port of San Francisco, by Presi- 
dent Buchanan, served four years. Retired to farm in 
Tehama county, California, during the War. In June, 
1865, became first Editor of the Examiner, which he con- 
trolled tintil the day of his death." 

26 Georgianna Augusta Washington, sixth child of 
John Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at 
Cedar Lawn, Charlestown, Jefferson county, West Vir- 
_ginia, 13 Mar., 1822. Removed to West Poultney, Ver- 
mont, thence to Washington, D. C, thence to Johnson 



WASHINGTON. 241 

county, Missouri, in 1857, thence to Little Rock, Arkansas. 
in 1866, where she now (1877) resides. Married at Cedar 
Lawn, West Virginia, 20 Nov., 1851, by Rev. Dudley A. 
Tyng, to John Wheeler, son of Samuel Mansfield (and 
Eliza) Smith, of Washington, Connecticut. Children : 
27 Edwin Curran Smith, born at West Poultney, Ver- 
mont, 3 Feb., 1853. 
27 Virginia Emeline Smith, born at East Poultney. 

Vermont, 25 Dec, 1855. 
27 Mary Washington Smith, born at Washington, D. 

C, 25 Nov., 1857. 
27 Eliza Mansfield Smith, born at Rose Hill, Mis- 
souri, I Feb., 1859. 
27 Wheeler Eaton Smith, born at Rose Hill, Mis- 
souri, 23 Oct., 1862. 

26 Mary Elizabeth Washington, seventh child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, near Charlestown, West Virginia, 24 May, 1824. 
Removed to Johnson county, Missouri, in 1857. Now 
(1877) resides in Index, Cass county, Missouri. Married 
in Johnson county, Missouri, 21 Sept., 1858, to Squire 
Asbury, a grand-nephew of President Zachary Taylor. 
Had three children. One son and two daughters. Two 
daughters died. Children : 

27 Charles Horace Asbury, born in Johnson county, 

Missouri, 17 Nov., 1859. 
27 Bessie Asbury, born in Johnson county, Missouri, 

Sept., i86t. Died 21 June, 1863. 
27 MiDA Hoi'E Asbury, born in Johnson county, Mis- 
souri, 19 Feb., 1864. Died. 

26 CoL. John Thornton Augustine Washington, Civil 
Engineer by profession, eighth child of John Thornton 
Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar Lawn, Charles- 
town, Jefferson • countv, West Virginia, 22 Jan., 1826. 
Was in United States Army. Now (1877) at Galveston, 
16 



WASHINGTON. 



Texas. Entered West Point, 1845. Graduated June, 
1849. Entered Army as Brevet-Lieutenant, Sixth United 
States Infantry, 1849. Second Lieutenant, Fifth Infan- 
try. First Lieutenant, First Infantry, and Aid-de-Camp 
to Major-General D. E. Twiggs, when the War com- 
menced. Resigned 8 Apr., 186 1. Served in the Confed- 
erate Army through the War. Was at one time General 
Lee's Chief-of-Staff. Now Civil Engineer. Married 8 
Mar., i860, at San Antonio, Texas, by Rev. R. F. Bunt- 
ing, to Olive Ann, daughter of Enoch (and Olive Ann) 
Jones, of San Antonio, Texas. Children : 

27 Flora Mary Washington, born at Indianola, 

Texas, i May, 1861. 
27 George Thornton Washington, born at San An- 
tonio, Texas, 13 Apr., 1863. 
27 Lee Howard Washington (girl), born at San An- 
tonio, Texas, 15 Apr., 1865. 
27 Sarah Washington, born at San Antonio, Texas, 

12 Apr., 1867. 
27 Lawrence Berry Washington, born at San An- 
tonio, Texas, 12 July, 1869. 
27 Olive Ann Washington, born at Galveston, Texas, 
17 Sept., 1875. 
He was Instructor of Tactics at West Point, when Jeffer- 
son Davis was Secretary of War. 

26 Mildred Ber^y Washington, ninth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Charlestown, West Virginia, 3 Sept., 1827. Died 
12 Sept., 1827. 

26 Mildred Berry Washington, tenth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Charlestown, West Virginia, 8 Mar., 1829. Re- 
moved 1854, to Lewis county, Kentucky. Removed to 
Johnson county, Missouri, in 1853, to Conway county, 



WASHINGTON. 243 

Arkansas, in 1866. Died 7 Nov., 1871, near Lewis- 
burg, Conway county, Arkansas. Married at Cedar 
Lawn, West Virginia, 8 F'eb., 1854, by Rev. Mr. Ambler, 
to Solomon Singleton Bedinger (dead), of Lewis county, 
Kentucky. Five children. Three sons and two daugh- 
ters. One son dead. Children : 

27 Henrietta Gray Bedinger, born in Lewis county, 

Kentucky, 17 Nov., 1854. 
27 Lavinia Bedinger, born in Lewis county, Ken- 
tucky, 29 May, 1857. 
27 Henry Clay Bedinger, born in Lewis county, 

Kentucky, 13 Sept., 1859. 
27 Arthur Singleton Bedinger, born in Lewis 
county, Kentucky, 7 Mar., 1862. Died 9 Nov., 1869. 
27 Solomon Berry Bedinger, born in Conway county, 
Arkansas, 7 Nov., 187 1. 

26 Hon. George Washington, Attorney-at-Law, and 
Judge of the County Court of Johnson county, Missouri, 
eleventh child of John Thornton Augustine Washington, 
first child of Thornton, first of Col. Samuel, by second 
wife, second of Augustine, by second wife, second of 
Laurence, first of Col. John, was born at or near Charles- 
town, in Jefferson county. West Virginia, 9 Dec, 1830. 
Removed in Mar., 1856, to Johnson county, Missouri. 
To San Francisco, California, in June, 1857. Returned 
to Johnson county, Missouri, in Aug., 1861. Was en- 
gaged in the War until 1866. Now (1876) at Centre 
View, Johnson county, Missouri. Married at Otterville, 
Cooper county, Missouri, by Rev. J. B. Logan, 11 Apr., 
187 1, to Mary Virginia, daughter of William Rowland 
(and Mahala) Dempsey, of Otterville, Missouri. She 
was born in Cooper county, Missouri, 23 May, 1844. 
Children : 

27 Robert Washington, born at Centre View, Mis- 
souri, 17 Mar., 1872. Dead. 



,244 WASHINGTON. 

27 Mary Virginia Washington, born at Centre View, 
Missouri, 14 June, 1873. 

27 Verxon de Hertburn Washington, born at Centre 
View, Missouri, 27 July, 1876. 
" He was Cashier of Customs, under his brother B. F. 
Washington, during his administration as Collector of the 
Port of San Francisco, in 1857 to 1861. He edited the 
Daily and Weekly National, during the years 1858-9, in con- 
junction with George P. Johnston. Obtained license to 
practice law in Supreme Court of California, in Spring 
of 1861. Resigned position as Cashier of Customs when 
the Civil War commenced. Reached Missouri in Summer 
of 1861, and entered State service on Confederate side. 
Was in the service of the Confederate States ; wounded 
and captured whilst on Price's raid into Missouri, near 
Fort Scott, 25 Oct., 1864. Sent to Johnson's Island and re- 
mained there until surrender of Richmond. Transferred 
to Cairo, then to New Orleans, and finally exchanged at 
mouth of Red River, 4 May, 1865. Returned to St. Louis, 
in Summer of 1865, and to Johnson county, in Spring of 
1866." 

26 Susan Ellsworth Washington, twelfth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Jefferson county, West Virginia, i Apr., 1833. Re- 
moved to Clarke county, Kentucky, about 1855. Moved to 
Johnson county, Missouri, in 1856, to Rose Hill, Index, 
Cass county, Missouri, 1857. Now (1877) there. Married 

at , 22 May, 1857, to Henry Clay, son of Bed- 

inger, of Lewis county, Kentucky. Eight children. 
Three boys, five girls ; one girl dead. Children : 

27 George Washington Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, 

Index^ Cass county, Missouri, 28 Feb., 1858. 
27 Lillian Thornton Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, 
Index, Cass county, Missouri, 27 Dec, 1859, 



WASHINGTON. 245 

27 Emma Bird Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, Index, 
Cass county, Missouri, 23 Feb., 1862. 

27 Susan Augusta Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, In- 
dex, Cass county, Missouri, 14 June, 1867. 

27 Henry Clay Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, Index, 
Cass county, Missouri, 18 Sept., 1869. 

27 Solomon Singleton Bedinger, born at Rose Hill, 
Index, Cass county, Missouri, 3 Oct., 1871. 

26 Henrietta Gray Washington, thirteenth child of John 
Thornton Augustine Washington, was born at Cedar 
Lawn, Jefferson county. West Virginia, 30 Sept., 1835. 
Died 18 Dec, 1838. 

26 Lucy Elizabeth Washington, first child of Dr. Sam- 
uel Walter Washington, second of George Steptoe Wash- 
ington, fourth of Col. Samuel, sixth of Augustine, sec- 
ond of Lawrence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, 
and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Harewood, 
Jefferson county, Virginia, about 1823. Now (1876) 
resides at Locust Hill, near Charlestown, Jefferson 
county. West Virginia. Married at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 4 Mar., 1840, by Rev. Dr. Henshaw, to John Bain- 
bridge Packett, of Charlestown, West Virginia, son of 
Lieutenant John (and Fanny Hammond) Packett, of 
United States Navy, and of Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Her husband died at Locust Hill, West Virginia, 18 
Nov., 1872. Children : 

27 Louise Clemson Packett, born at Locust Hill, 

West Virginia, 4 Mar., 1848. 
27 Fannie Hammond Packett, born at Locust Hill, 

West Virginia, 6 May, 1850. 
27 Elizabeth Barton Packett, born at Locust Hill, 

West Virginia, 2 Sept., 1852. 
27 William Bainbridge Packett, born at Locust 
Hill, West Virginia, 14 Feb., 1854, 



246 WASHINGTON. 

27 George Washington Packett, born at Locust 

Hill, West Virginia. 13 Aug., 1855. 
27 Christine Washington Packett, born at Locust 

Hill, West Virginia, Feb., 1858. Died infant. 
27 Lucv Madison Packett, born at Locust Hill, 

West Virginia, 22 Feb., i860. 
27 Walter Harewood Packett, born at Locust Hill, 

West Virginia, 2 Nov., 1863. 

26 George La Fayette Washington, second child of Dr. 
Samuel Walte." Washington, was born at Harewood, Jef- 
ferson county, Virginia, 12 Jan., 1825. Removed to 
Claymont, Delaware, 1865. Died at Lehigh Valley, 
Pennsylvania, 7 Feb., 1872. Married at Claymont, Del- 
aware, 29 Apr., 1859, to Anna Bull Clemson, daughter of 
Rev. John B. Clemson, of Claymont. Widow, now (1876) 
at Claymont. Delaware. Children : 

27 Margaretta Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 11 June, i860. 
27 Louisa Clemson Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 29 Apr., 1862. Died June, 1865, 
27 John Clemson Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 5 Jan., 1865. 
27 Martha Washington, born at Claymont, Delaware, 

29 Aug., 1867. 
27 Annie Harewood Washington, born at Claymont, 

Delaware, 26 Nov., 1869. 
27 Elizabeth Fisher Washington, born at Lehigh 
Valley, 20 Dec, 1871. 

26 Christine Maria Washington, third child of Dr. Sam- 
uel Walter Washington, was born at Harewood. Jeffer- 
son county. West Virginia, 16 Dec, 1826. Now (1876) 
there. Married at Philadelphia, by Rev. John B. Clem- 
son, 20 Nov., 1844, to Richard Blackburn Washington, 



WASHINGTON. 247 

«on of John Augustine (and Jane Blackburn) Washing, 
ton, of . Children : 

27 Elizabeth Clemson Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 21 Aug., 1845. 

27 John Augustine Washington, born at Harewood, 
Virginia, 27 May, 1847. 

27 Anna M. T. Blackburn Washington, born at 
Harewood, Virginia, i Nov., 1849. 

27 Louisa Clemson Washington, born at Harewood, 
Virginia, 17 Nov., 185 1. 

27 Samuel Walter Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, i Nov., 1853. 

27 Richard Blackburn Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 21 Mar., 1856. 

27 Christine Maria Washington, born at Harewood., 
Virginia, 13 June, 1858. 

27 George Steptoe Washington, born at Harewood, 
Virginia, 7 June, i860. 

27 William de Hertburn Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 14 Feb., 1864. 

26 Annie Steptoe Clemson Washington, fourth child of 
Dr. Samuel Walter Washington, was born at Harewood, 
West Virginia, 8 Sept., 1831. Removed to Missouri in 
1858, and returned in 1865, to Charlestovvn, West Vir- 
ginia, where she now (1876) resides. Married in St. 
Mark's Church, at Philadelphia, by Rev. John B. Clem- 
son, 17 Oct., 1854, to Thomas Augustus Brown, of 
Charlestown, West Virginia, son of William (and Eliz- 
abeth Forrest) Brown. Children : 

27 Forrest Washington Brown, born at Harewood, 

West Virginia, 15 Oct., 1855. 
27 Mary Harrison Brown, born in Randolph county, 

Missouri, 11 Feb., 1859. 
27 Louis.\ Clemson Brown, born in Randolph county, 
Missouri, 8 July, 1861. 



248 WA SUING TON. 

27 Annie Augusta Brown, born in Missouri, 10 Aug.^ 

1863. Died 14 Nov., 1863. 
27 Anna Floride Brown, born at Sulgrave, near 

Charlestown, West Virginia, in Aug., 1872. 

26 Miss R B Washington, fifth child of Dr. Sam- 
uel Walter Washington, was born at Harewood, Jefferson 
county, West Virginia, about 1835. Now (1877) at 
Charlestown, Jefferson county, West Virginia. 

26 Lucy Washington, first child of William Temple Wash- 
ington, third of George Steptoe, fourth of Col. Samuel,, 
sixth of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of CoL 
John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, 
was born at Lexington, Kentucky, 8 Oct.. 1822. Died 12: 
Oct., 1822. 

26 MiLLissENT Washington, second child of William Tem- 
ple Washington, was born in Bath county, Virginia, 4 
Aug., 1824. Removed to Frederick City, Maryland, in 
1853. Now (1877) there. Married at Megwille, Jefferson 
county, Virginia, 10 Dec. 1840, by Rev. Alexander Jones, 
to Robert Grier, son of Robert G. (and Maria) McPher- 
son. Children : 

27 Maria McPherson, born in Jefferson county, Vir- 
ginia, II Feb., 1842. Married to Dr. Robert F. 
Wier, 37 West Thirty-third street, New York. One 
daughter : 

28 Alice Washington Wier. 
27 Robert Grier McPherson, born in Jeflferson 

county, Virginia, 6 Feb., 1844. Died 4 Sept., 1847. 
27 William Washington McPherson, born in Jeffer- 
son county, Virginia, 10 June, 1846. Resides (1877) 
at Stillwater, Minnesota. 
27 Catharine Davis McPherson, born in Jefferson 

county, Virginia, 17 Oct., 1850. 
27 MiLLissENT Washington McPherson, born in Jef- 



WASHINGTON. 24^ 

ferson county, Virginia, 17 Oct., 1850. Died 5 Sept., 
1852. 

27 Frank McPherson, born in Jefferson county, Vir- 
ginia, 5 Nov., 1852. Died 9 Sept., 1853. 

27 Margaret Washington McPherson, born at 
Frederick City, Maryland, 26 Sept., 1855. 

27 Robert Grier McPherson, born at Frederick City, 
Maryland, 16 Feb., 1858. 

26 William Temple Washington, third child of William 
Temple Washington, was born at Lexington, Kentucky, 
7 Jan., 1827. Removed to Indiana, in 1851. Now (1877) 
in Missouri. Married in 1846, in Kentucky, Lydia, 

daughter of Herndon, of . No children. 

Wife died in Indiana, in 1850. 

26 Thomas Washington, fofxrth child of William Temple 
Washington, was born at Megwille, Virginia, 17 Mar., 
1C29. Died in or on the way to Missouri, 12 Apr., 1849. 

26 Jane Charlotte Washington, fifth child of William 
Temple Washington, was born at Megwille, Virginia, 29 
June, 1834. Removed April, 1850, to Falmouth, Stafford 
county, Virginia. Now (1876) there. Married at Fal- 
mouth, Virginia, i Mar., 1866, by Rev. Magruder Maury, 
to Thomas G. Moncure, son of Hon. R. C. L. Moncure, 
Chief Justice of Virginia, Stafford county. Children : 
27 Temple Washington Moncure, born in Stafford 

county, Virginia, 14 Dec, 1868. 
27 R. C. L. Moncure, born in Stafford county, Vir- 
ginia, 10 Dec, 1869. Died 5 July, 1870. 
27 Eugenia Washington Moncure, born in Stafford 

county, Virginia, 22 May, 1872. 
27 Hull Moncure, born in Stafford county, Virginia, 
II Dec, 1873. 

26 Eugenie Washington, sixth child of William Temple 



250 



WASHINGTON. 



Washington, was born at Megwille, Virginia, 24 June, 
1840. Removed to Falmouth, Virginia, A. D. 1856, to 
Washington, D. C, A. D. 1866. Now (1877) there. 

26 Ferdinand Steptoe Washington, seventh child of 
William Temple Washington, was born at Megwille, Vir- 
ginia, 22 Jan., 1843. Removed to Falmouth, Virginia, A. 
D. 1856. To Arkansas, 1869. Now (1877) in Arkansas. 

26 Laurence Augustine Washington, first child of Dr. 

, Laurence Augustine Washington, third of Laurence 
Augustine, fifth of Col. Samuel, seventh of Augustine, 
second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, Eng- 
land, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born in Kanawha 
county. West Virginia, 21 Mar., 1846. Removed to 
Colorado county, Texas, and died there, 20 Aug., 1852. 

26 Walter Gcod Washington, second child of Dr. Lau- 
rence Augustine Washington, was born in Mason county, 
West Virginia, 21 Feb., 1843. Removed in 1874 to Deni- 
son, Texas. Now (1877) there. Unmarried. 

26 John Shrewsbury Washington, third child of Dr. Lau- 
rence Augustine Washington, was born in Mason county, 
West Virginia, 27 Apr., 1845. Removed, 1874, to Deni- 
son, Texas. Now (1877) there. Unmarried. 

26 James Turner Washington, fourth child of Dr. Lau- 
rence Augustine Washington, was born in Mason county, 
West Virginia, 3 Mar., 1847. Removed in 1875 to Co- 
manche county, Texas. Now (1877) there. Married at 
Brownwood, Brown county, Texas, in 1875, to Josephine 
Burras. One child : 

27 Martha Washington, born in Comanche county 
Texas, Nov., 1876. 

26 Emma Tell Washington, fifth child of Dr. Laurence 
Augustine Washington, was born in Mason county, West 



WASHINGTON. 251 

Virginia, 27 Sept., 1849. Removed to Eagle Lake, Colo- 
rado county, Texas ; to Junction City, Kansas, in Sept., 
1868 ; to Denison, Texas, in Apr.. 1873. Now (1877) there. 
Married 14 Sept., 1865, at Eagle Lake, Texas, by Rev. Mr. 
Foote, to George Lee Patrick, son of George Washing- 
ton (and Margaret) Patrick, of Visalia, California. Chil- 
dren : 

27 George Washington Patrick, born at Eagle Lake, 

Texas, 16 Aug., 1866. 
27 Laurence Augustine Patrick, born at Eagle Lake, 
Texas, 4 Oct., 1868. Died at Junction City, Kansas, 
4 Feb., 1869. 
27 Margaret Patrick, born at Junction City, Kansas, 

10 Feb., 1870. Died 13 July, 1870. 
27 Martha Wood Patrick, born at Junction City, 

Kansas, i Oct., 1871. 
27 Isabella Lucy Patrick, born at Denison, Texas, 

12 Feb., 1874. 
17 Charles Fox Patrick, born at Denison, Texas, 30 
May, 1876. 

26 Julia Wood Washington, sixth child of Dr. Laurence 
Augustine Washington, was born at Columbus, Colorado 
county, Texas, 29 May, 1850. Removed in June, 1873, to 
St. Louis, Missouri, thence to Galveston, Texas. Now 
(1877) there. Married at Columbus, Texas, by Rev. Mr. 
Trader, 19 June, 1873, to Sidney Thurston, son of Henry 
Whiting (and Susan Elizabeth) Fontaine, of Houston, 
Texas. Children : 

27 Annie Washington Fontaine, born at St. Louis, 
Missouri, 23 Mar., 1874. Died at Denison, Texas, 3 
June, 1875. 
27 Shirley Washington Fontaine, born at Denison, 
Texas, i Jan., 1876. 

26 Cecil Wood Washington, seventh child of Dr. Lau- 



252 WA SHING TON. 

rence Augustine Washington, was born in Colorado 
county, Texas, i Jan., 1858. Removed to Denison, 
Texas, in 1874. Now (1877) there. Unmarried. 

26 Martha Dickinson Shrewsbury, first child of Laura 
Shrewsbury, fourth of Harriet Parks, sixth of Col. Sam- 
uel Washington, seventh of Augustine, second of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Shrewsbury, Vir- 
ginia, 3 Feb., 1828. Died at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 24 Mar., 1875. Married at Shrewsbury, 4 Feb., 
1847, by Rev. Mr. Ward, to Major Nicholas Fitzhugh, of 
Charlestown, West Virginia, son of Henry (and Henri- 
etta) Fitzhugh, of Ravenswood, Jackson county, North 
Virginia. Children : 

27 Laura Fitzhugh, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 27 Nov., 1848. Married A. A. Preston, of 
Richmond, Virginia. 
27 Henry Fitzhugh, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 28 Dec, 1853. 
27 Mattie Fitzhugh, born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 27 July, 1856. 
27 Nicholas Fitshugh, born at Charlestown, West 

Virginia, 30 Jan., 1858. 
27 Laurence Shrewsbury Fitzhugh, born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 15 Sept., i860. 

26 Laurence Washington Shrewsbury, second child of 
Laura Shrewsbury, vras born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 
11 Oct., 1831. Removed in 1850 to Klamath county, Cal- 
ifornia. 

26 Albert Shrewsbury, third child of Laura Shrewsbury, 
was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, about 1833. Died in- 
fant. 



WASHINGTON. 253 

26 Andrew Parks Shrewsbury, fourth child of Laura 
Shrewsbury, was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 6 July, 
1846. Removed 1864, to , Nevada. 

26 Harriet Washington Shrewsbury, fifth child of Laura 
Shrewsbury, was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 15 May, 
1840. Died I Jan., 1876. She removed in 1864, to 
Charlestown, West Virginia, where she died. 

26 Cornelia Shrewsbury, sixth child of Laura Shrews- 
bury, was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 4 Apr., 1842. Re- 
moved in 1864, to Charlestown, West Virginia, and thence 
to San Francisco, California, in 1872. Now (1877) there. 
Married at Charlestown, West Virginia, 9 Oct., 1872, by 
Rev. Mr. Callaway, to Enoch South Gany, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, and San Francisco. Children : 

27 Herbert Gany, born at San Francisco, California, 
14 Aug., 1872. 

27 Laura Mattie Gany. Died infant. 

26 Laura Shrewsbury, seventh child of Laura Shrews- 
bury, was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 16 Apr., 1844. 
Removed in 1864, to Charlestown, West Virginia. Now 
(1877) there. 

26 Samuel Shrewsbury, eighth child of Laura Shrews- 
bury, was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 27 Nov., 1847. 
Removed 1864, to Charlestown, West Virginia ; thence to 
Independence, Missouri. Now (1877) there. 

26 Henry Shrewsbury, ninth child of Laura Shrewsbury, 
was born at Shrewsbury, Virginia, 12 Oct., 1853. Re- 
moved 1864, to Charlestown, West Virginia. Now (1877) 
there. 

26 Creed Parks, first child of Major Andrew Parks, fifth 



254 WASHINGTON. 

of Mrs. Harriet Parks, sixth of Col. Samuel Washing- 
ton, third of Augustine, by second wife, second of Lau- 
rence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's 
Creek, Virginia, was born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, A. D. 1842. Died at , 27 July, 1864. 

26 BusHROD Parks, second child of Major Andrew Parks,, 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, A. D. 1845, 

Removed about . Now (1877) at Neosho, Newton 

county, Missouri. Married at . 

26 Harriot Parks, third child of Major Andrew Parks,, 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 27 Oct., 1848. 
Removed to Lancaster, Ohio. Thence to Columbus^ 
Ohio. Now (1877) there. Married at Lancaster, Ohio^ 
27 June, 1867, to Theodore W. Tallmadge, Attorney-at- 
Law, of Columbus, Ohio. Children : 

27 Flora Tallmadge, born at Columbus, Ohio, i Oct.^ 

1868. 
27 Andrew Tallmadge, born at Columbus, Ohio, 16 
Jan., 1870. 

26 Andrew Parks, fourth child of Major Andrew Parks^ 
was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 27 Oct., 1852. 
Now (1877) there. 

26 George Washington, first of John Augustine, second 
of Corbin, fourth of John Augustine, seventh of Augus- 
tine, second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton^ 
England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at 
Blakeley, West Virginia, about 1815. Died young. 

26 Anne Maria Washington, second child of John Au- 
gustine, was born at Blakeley, West Virginia, 5 Nov.^ 
1817. Removed in May, 1834, from Mount Vernon to- 
Howard, near Alexandria, and to Vine Hill, A. D. 1835,. 
thence to Walnut Farm, Virginia, about 1840. Died at 



WASHINGTON. 255 

Blakeley, 29 Mar., 1850. Married at Mount Vernon, by- 
Rev. Dr. E, R. Leppett, 15 May, 1834, to Dr. William 
Fontaine Alexander, son of Charles (and Mary Bowles 
Armisted) Ale:«ander, of Motint Ida, near Alexandria, 
Virginia. He died at Walnut Farm, West Virginia, in 
Jan., 1862. Children : 

27 Jean Charlotte Alexander, born at Alexandria, 
28 Jan., 1835. Married Dr. J. A. Straith. Lives at 
Staunton, Virginia. 
27 Wilson Cary Selden Alexander, born at Vine 

Hill, 8 Feb., 1836. Died 1859. 
27 Louisa Fontaine Alexander, born at Blakeley, 

13 Nov., 1837. Died April 24, 1839. 
27 John Augustine Alexander, born at Blakeley, 24 

Oct., 1839. Died Aug. 11, 1854. 
27 Mary FontXine Alexander, born at Walnut 

Farm, 12 Mar., 1845. Married Ransom. Now 

(1877) at Staunton, Virginia. 
27 Charles Armisted Alexander, born at Walnut 

Farm, 12 May, 1843. Died in March, 1864. 
27 Ann Burnett Alexander, born at Walnut Farm, 
'9 July, 1848. Died in July, 1864. 

26 John Augustine Washington, third child of John 
Augustine, was born at Blakeley, 3 May, 1820. He was 
killed at Cheat Mountain, West Virginia, 13 Sept., r86i. 
He was married at Exeter, Loudon county, Virginia, in 
Feb., 1842, to Eleanor Love, daughter of Wilson Cary 
Selden, of Exeter, Loudon county, Virginia. Chil- 
dren : 

27 Louisa Fontaine Washington, born at Mount 

Vernon, Virginia, 19 Feb., 1844. 
27 Jane Charlotte Washington, born at Mount 

Vernon, Virginia, 26 May. 1846. 
27 Eliza Selden Washington, born at Mount Ver- 
non, Virginia, 17 July, 1848. 



356 WASHINGTON. 

27 Akne Maria WASHiNioroN, born at Mount Vernon^ 
Virginia, 17 Nov., 185 1. 

27 Lawrence Washington, born at Mount Vernon, 
Virginia, 14 Jan., 1854. 

27 Eleanor Love Washington, born at Mount Ver- 
non, Virginia, 14 Mar., 1856. 

27 George Washington, born at Mount Vernon, Vir- 
ginia, 22 July, 1858. 

26 Richard Blackburn Washington, fourth child of John 
Augustine, was born at Blakeley, West Virginia, 12 Nov., 

1822. Removed about , to Harewood, Jefferson 

county. West Virginia. Now (1877) there. Married at 
Philadelphia, by Rev. John B. Clemson, 20 Nov., 1844, 
to Christine Maria, daughter of Dr. Samuel Walter 
Washington, of Harewood, Virginia. Children : 

27 Elizabeth Clemson Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 21 Aug., 1845. ♦ 
27 John Augustine Washington, born at Harewood, ' 

Virginia, 27 May, 1847. 
27 Anna M. F. Blackburn Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, i Nov., 1849. 
27 Louisa Clemson Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 17 Nov., 185 1. 
27 Samuel Walter Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, i Nov., 1853. 
27 Richard Blackburn Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 21 Mar., 1856. 
27 Christine Maria Washington, born at Harewood, 

Virginia, 13 June, 1858. 
27 George Steptoe Washington, born at Harewood, ' 

Virginia, 7 June, i860. 
27 William de Hertburn Washington, born at Hare- 
wood, Virginia, 14 Feb., 1864. 

26 Spoiswood Augustine Washington, .first child of 



WASHINGTON. 257 

- Bushrod, fourth of William Augustine, first of Augus- 
tine, second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of War- 
ton, England, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia ; was born 
at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1810. Removed to 
Illinois. Has children. 

26 Ann Washington, second child of Bushrod, was born 

at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1812. Died at . 

Married at , about , to Rev. W. P. C. Johnson. 

" Several children. One married Dr. Magruder, of Mont- 
gomery county, Maryland." 

26 Jane Mildred Washington, third child of Bushrod, 
was born at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1814. Died 
unmarried. 

26 George Washington, fourth child of Bushrod, was 
born at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1816. Married, 
and died without issue. 

26 John Washington, fifth child of Bushrod, was born at 
Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1818. Died unmarried. 

26 Mary Washington, sixth child of Bushrod, was born 
at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1820. 

26 CoRBiN Washington, seventh child of Bushrod, was 
born at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1822. 

26 Frances (or Fanny) Washington, eighth child of Bush- 
rod, was born at Mount Zephyr, Virginia, about 1825. 
Married Finch. Now (1877) a widow, living at Morris- 
ania, Westchester county. New York. 

26 Churchill Thornton, first child of Ann Maria Wash- 
ington, second of Col. George Augustine, first of Col. 
Charles, fifth of Augustine, by second wife, second of 
17 



2S8 WASHINGTON. 

Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Vii-ginia, was born at —■ , about 1812. 

26 Charles Thornton, second child of Ann Maria Wash- 
ington, was born at , about 1815. 

26 Charles Augustine Washington, first child of George 
Fayette, third of Col. George Augustine, first of Col. 
Charles, fifth of Augustine, by second wife, second of 
Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, England, and 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 9 Aug., 1814. Lived at Wellington, below 
Alexandria. Sold his place and returned to Waverly. 
He died at Georgetown, West Virginia, in 1861. Not 
married. 

26 Francis Massey Washington, third child of George 
Fayette (second child died young), was born at Charles- 
town, West Virginia, 21 Jan., 1816. 

26 George Fayette Washington, fourth child of George 
Fayette, was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 21 
Feb., 1823. Resided for some time at Greenwood, Vir- 
ginia, and died at Waverly, Virginia, about 1853. Not 
married. 

26 Mathew Barwell Bassett Washington, fifth child of 
George Fayette, was born at Charlestown, West Vir- 
ginia, 15 Aug., 1830. Removed to Winchester in Nov., 
1863 ; to vVaverly, in May, 1865. Died there, i Aug., 
1868. Married at the University of Virginia, 20 Mar., 
1862, by Rev. William Hoge, to Nannie Bird Dandridge, 
daughter of Thomas Ely (and Ann Spottswood Dan- 
dridge) Buckannan, of Waverly. She now (1877) resides, 
a widow, at Waverly, near Stephenson's Depot, Freder- 
ick county, Virginia. One child : 



WASHINGTON. 259 

27 Nannie Bird Washington, born at Winchester, 
Virginia, 17 Mar., 1864. 

26 Hannah Lee Washington, first child of Bushrod Cor- 
bin Washington, tiiird of Corbin, fourth of John Augus- 
tine, seventh of Augustine, second of Laurence, first of 
Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, 
Virginia, was born at Rippon Lodge, Prince William 
county, Virginia, 19 May, 181 1. Removed 9 Feb., 1869, 
to Duffield, Virginia. Now (1877) there. Married at 

, about 1830, William P. Alexander, of . 

Husband died at Alexandria, Virginia, A. D. 1862. 
Children : 

27 Dr. William F. Alexander, of Duffield Depot, 

Jefferson county, Virginia, born about 1832. 
27 Jennie Alexander, of Duffield Depot, Jefferson 

county, Virginia, born about 1835. 
27 Richard A. Alexander, of Charlestown, Jefferson 

county. West Virginia, born about 1837. 
27 Thomas Alexander, of Charlestown, Jefferson 

county. West Virginia, born about 1840. Dead. 
27 Herbert Alexander, of Charlestown, Jefferson 
county. West Virginia, born about 1845. Dead. 

26 Thomas Blackburn Washington, second child of Bush- 
rod Corbin Washington, was born at Rippon Lodge, 
Prince William county, Virginia, about 1813. He died 
in Aug., 1854, leaving five children. Married Rebecca, 
daughter of William Cunningham, of Richlands, Fred- 
erick county, Maryland. Five children : 

27 Bushrod Corbin Washington, born about 1842. 

27 Thomas Blackburn Washington, born about 1845. 

27 Anna Washington, born about 1850. 

27 

27 
His widow married Rev. Mr. Lyle, and is living in China. 



26o IV A SHING TON. 

27 Edwin Curran Smith, first child of Georgiana Augusta 
Washington, sixth of John Thornton Augustine, first of 
Thornton Washington, first of Colonel Samuel, by sec- 
ond wife, second of Augustine, by second wife, second 
of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, England, 
&c.; was born at West Poultney, Vermont, 3 Feb., 1853. 
Removed to Little Rock, Arkansas. Now (1877) at 

Deadwood, Dakotah Territory. Married at , 3 

Jan., 1875, to Elizabeth Turrell, of . One child : 

28 Edwin Curran Smith, born at — , 23 Oct., 1875. 

27 Virginia Emeline Smith, second child of Georgiana 
Augusta Washington, was born at East Poultney, Ver- 
mont, 25 Dec, 1815. Removed to Little Rock, Arkansas. 
Now (1877) there. 

27 Mary Washington Smith, third child of Georgiana 
Augusta Washington, was born at Washington, D. C, 25 
Nov., 1857. Removed to Little Rock, Arkansas. Now 
(1877) there. 

27 Eliza Mansfield Smith, fourth child of Georgiana 
Augusta Washington, was born at Rose Hill, Missouri, 
I Feb., 1859. Removed to Little Rock, Arkansas. Now 
(1877) there. 

27 Wheeler Eaton Smith, fifth child of Georgiana Au- 
gusta Washington, was born at Rose Hill, Missouri, 25 
Oct., 1862. Removed to Little Rock, Arkansas. Now 
(1877) there. 

27 George Corbin Washington, first child of Lewis Wil- 
liam, first of George Corbin Washington, sixth of Wil- 
liam Augustine, third of Augustine, second of Augustine, 
second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, 
England, &c.; was born at Baltimore, Maryland, Mar., 
1837. Died there, 30 Sept., 1843. 



WA SHING TON. 2 6 1 

27 James Barroll Washington, second child of Lewis 
William, was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 26 Aug., 1839. 
Removed in 1873 to Pittsburgh, Virginia. Now (1876) 
there. Secretary and Auditor of Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road Company. Married at Montgomery, Alabama, by 
Rev. J. M. Mitchell, to Mrs. Jane Britney Lanier Cabell, 
daughter of William L. (and Virginia Armisted) Lanier, 
of Selma, Alabama. His children were : 

28 William Lanier Washington, born at Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, 30 Mar., 1865. 
28 Benjamin Cabell Washington, born near Balti- 
more, Maryland, 16 Nov., 1866. 
28 Lewis William Washington, born at Baltimore, 

Maryland, 20 Nov., 1869. 
28 Mary Washington, born at Baltimore, 4 Oct., 1871. 
Died 22 Aug., 1872. 

27 Mary Ann Washington, third child of Lewis William, 
was born at Baltimore, Maryland, i June, 1841. Now 
(1876) there. Married in Grace Church, at Baltimore, 
Maryland, 17 Nov., 1864, by R. A. A. Curtis, to Henry 
Irvine Keyser, son of Samuel Keyser, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. Children : 

28 Henry Barroll Keyser, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 9 Sept., 1865. 
28 Samuel Irvine Keyser, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 30 June, 1869. Died 4 Mar., 1874. 
28 Lewis Washington Keyser, born at Baltimore, 

Maryland, 21 Nov., 1870. Died 5 June, 1871. 
28 Irvine Keyser, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 30 

Apr., 1872. 
28 Mary Washington Keyser, born at Baltimore, 
Maryland, 20 Nov., 1874. 

27 Eliza Ridgeley Washington, fourth child of Lewis 
William Washington, was born at , Jefferson 



2 C 2 JVA SHING TON. 

county, West Virginia, i6 Nov., 1844. Removed to Bal- 
. timore, in 1844. Now (1876) there. Married there, 25 
Apr., 1865, by Rev. Dr. M. Mahan, to Elias Glenn Fer- 
ine, son of David M. (and Mary) Ferine, of Baltimore, 
Maryland. Children : 

28 Marv Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 30 

May, 1866. 
28 William B. Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 

28 Nov., 1867. 
28 David M. Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 13 

Feb.,' 1869. 
28 Washington Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 

14 Oct., 1870. 
28 Glenn Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 5 

Sept., 1871. 
28 Evelyn Ferine, born at Baltimore, Maryland, 10 

Mar., 1873. 
28 George Corbin Ferine, born at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, 3 June, 1874. 
28 Mildred Washington Ferine, born at Baltimore, 
Maryland, 30 Sept., 1875. 

27 Betty Lewis Washington, fifth child of Lewis Wil- 
liam Washington, was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 26 
Aug., 1861. Died 25 July, 1862. 

27 William de Hertburn Washington, sixth child of 
Lewis William Washington, was born at Baltimore, 
Maryland, 29 June, 1863. 

27 Ellen Lewis King, first child of Mrs. Betty Washing- 
ton King, fifth of Mrs. Ella Jael" Steele, fourth of Howell 
Lewis, fourth of Mrs. Betty Washington Lewis, sixth of 
Augustine Washington, second of Laurence, first of 
Col. John, of Warton, England, and Bridge's Creek, 
, Virginia, was born, at Akron, Ohio, 13 June, 1850. Now 



WA SHING TON. 263 

<i877) there. Married at Akron, 19 Jan., 1870, to David 
Raymond Paige, son of Judge David R. (and Nancy) 
Paige, of Painesville, Ohio. Children : 

28 Charles Cutler Paige, born at Akron, Ohio, 25 

Nov., 1870. 
28 David King Paige, born at Akron, Ohio, 20 May, 
1872. 

27 Betty Steele King, second child of Mrs. Betty Wash- 
ington King, was born at Cleveland, Ohio, 22 Dec, 1851. 
Removed to Akron, Ohio. Now (1877) there. Married 
at Cleveland, Ohio, 10 Dec, 1873, to John Gilbert Ray- 
mond, of Akron, Ohio. 

27 Howell King, third child of Mrs. Betty Washington 
King, was born at Cleveland, Ohio, 3 May, 1853. 

27 Susan Huntington King, fourth child of Mrs. Betty 
Washington, was born at Cleveland, Ohio, 16 Jan., 1855. 

27 Martha Perkins King, fifth child of Mrs. Betty Wash- 
ington King, was born at Cleveland, Ohio, 6 Apr., 1863. 

27 John Thornton Washington, first child of Benjamin 
Franklin Washington, fifth of John Thornton Augustine 
Washington, first of Thornton, first of Colonel Samuel, 
by second wife, third of Augustine, by second wife, sec- 
ond of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, Eng- 
land, &c.; was born at Charlestown, West Virginia, 26 
July, 1846. Removed to Sacramento, 1852, to San Fran- 
cisco, California, A. D., 1854. Now (1877) there. Not 
married. 

27 Frank B. Washington, second child of Benjamin 
Franklin Washington, was born at Charlestown, West 
Virginia, 20 June, 1848. Removed to San Francisco, 
California, in Sept., 1852. Now (1877) there, unmarried. 



264 WASHINGTON. 

27 Fanny Madeline Washington, third child of Benjamin 
Franklin Washington, was born at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, Aug., 1853. Now (1877) there. Married at San 
Francisco, California, in Apr., 1875, ^^o D. Delhanty. 

27 Lilian Washington, fourth child of Benjamin Franklin 
Washington, was born at San Francisco, California, A. 
D. 1855. Died 1856. 

27 Bertha James Washington, fifth child of Benjamin 
Franklin Washington, was born at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, in March, 1858. Now (1877) there. 

27 Jane Charlotte Alexander, first child of Anne Maria 
Washington, second of John Augustine, second of Cor: 
bin, fourth of John Augustine, seventh of Augustine, 
second of Laurence, first of Colonel John, of Warton, 
England, &c.; was born at Alexandria, Virginia, in Feb.j 
1834 Married Dr. J. A. Straith. Lives (1877) at Staun- 
ton, Virginia. 

27 Wilson Carv S. Alexander, second child of Anne Maria ' 
Washington, was born at Alexandria, Virginia, about 
1836. Died before marriage. 

27 Louisa Fontaine Alexander, third child of Anne Ma- 
ria Washington, was born at Alexandria, Virginia, about 
1838. Died. 

27 John Augustine Alexander, fourth child of Anne 
Maria Washington, was born at Alexandria, Virginia, 
about 1840. Died. 

27 Mary Fontaine Alexander, fifth child of Anne Marij^ 
Washington, was born in Jefferson county, Virginia, 12 
Mar., 1845. Removed in April, 1871, to Staunton, Au- 
gusta county, Virginia. Now (1877) there. Married at 



WASHINGTON. 265 

Charlestown, Jefferson county, Virginia, by Rev. Wm. 
H. Meade, of Zion Episcopal Church, 12 April, 187 1, to 
Thos. Davis Ransom, son of James M. (and Eleanor Bald- 
win) Ransom, of Charlestown, West Virginia. 

28 Charlotte Alexandra Ransom, born at Staunton, 

Virginia, 12 Apr., 1872. 
28 John Baldwin Ransom, born at Staunton, Virginia, 

4 Jan., 1874. 
28 Maria Washington Ransom, born at Staunton, 
Virginia, 29 Sept., 1875. 

27 Charles Armisted Alexander, sixth child of Anne 
Maria Washington, was born at Alexandria, Virginia, 
about 1847. Died young. 

• 

27 Ann Burnett Alexander, seventh child of Anne Maria 
Washington, was born at Alexandria, Virginia, about 
1849. Died young. 

27 Louisa Fontaine Washington, first child of John Au- 
gustine Washington, third of John Augustine, second of 
Corbin, fourth of John Augustine, seventh of Augustine, 
second of Laurence, first of Col. John, of Warton, Eng- 
land, and Bridge's Creek, Virginia, was born at Mount 

Vernon, Virginia, 19 Feb., 1844. Removed about , 

to Blakeley, West Virginia. Now (1876) there. Married 

at , about , to Col. R. P. Chew, son of 

Chew, of . 

27 Jane Charlotte Washington, second child of John 
Augustine Washington, was born at Mount Vernon, Vir- 
ginia, 26 May, 1846. Removed about , to Rock Hall, 

Jefferson county. West Virginia. Now (1876) there. 

Married at , about , to Nathaniel H. Willis, 

son of Willis, of . 



266 WASHINGTON. 

27 Eliza Selden Washington, third child of John Augus- 
tine Washington, was born at Blakeley, Jefferson county, 
West Virginia, 17 July, 1848. Removed in i860, to 
Waveland, Fauquier county, Virginia, and in 1861, to Jef- 
ferson county. West Virginia ; thence to Warsaw, Vir- 
ginia. Now (1877) there. Not married. 

27 Ann Maria Washington, fourth child of John Augus- 
tine Washington, was born at Mount Vernon, Virginia, 
17 Nov., 1851. Removed i860, to Fauquier county; to 
Jefferson county, in 1861, and in 1873, to Warsaw, Rich- 
mond county, Virginia. Now (1876) there. Married by 
Rev. Mr. Leavell, at Charlestown, West Virginia, 22 
July, 1873, to Rev. Beverly Dandridge Tucker, son of 
Beverly (and Jane Ellis) Tucker, of Richmond, Virginia. 
Children : " 

28 Henry St. George Tucker, born at Warsaw, Vir- 
ginia, 16 July, 1874. 
28 Emily Selden Tucker, born at Warsaw, Virginia, 
I Nov., 1875. 

27 Laurence Washington, fifth child of John Augustine 
Washington, was born at Mount Vernon, Virginia, 14 

Jan., 1854. Removed about , to Waveland, near 

Salem, Fauquier county, Virginia. Now (1876) there. 
Married at Charlestown, West Virginia, 14 June, 1876, to 
Fanny, daughter of Thomas Lackland, of Charlestown, 
West Virginia. 

27 Eleanor Love Washington, sixth child of John Au- 
gustine Washington, was born at Mount Vernon, Vir- 
ginia, 14 Mar., 1856. Removed i860, to Fauquier county, 
Virginia; to Jefferson county. West Virginia, in 1861. 
Now (1877) resides in Jefferson county, West Virginia. 
Not married. 



IVASHINGTON. 267 

27 George Washington, seventlr child of John Augustine 
Washington, was born at Mount Vernon, Virginia, 22 
July, 1858. Removed to Fauquier county, Virginia, in 
i860. Now (1877) in Jefferson county, West Virginia. 
Unmarried. 

24 Laurence Lewis (see page 178) had four children : 

25 Eleanor Parke Lewis, born in Fairfax county, 

Virginia, i Dec, 1799. She married Colonel Butler, 

of Louisiana. 
25 Angela Lewis, born in Fairfax county, Virginia, 

about 1801. She married C. M. Conrad, of New 

Orleans. 
25 Lorenzo Lewis, born in Fairfax county, Virginia, 

in Nov., 1803. 

25 Agnes Lewis, died at the age of 16 years. 

" Laurence Lewis was a favorite nephew of General 
Washington, and one of his Executors. He married one 
of his adopted daughters, Nellie Custis." 

25 Lorenzo Lewis (above), removed to Audley, Clarke 
county, Virginia, about 1840, and died there, in Aug., 
1847. He was married in Philadelphia in 1826, to Esther 
Marion, daughter of John Redman Coxe, of Philadel- 
phia. His children were : 

26 George Washington Lewis, born in Philadelphia, 
12 Feb., 1829. 

26 John Redivian Cox Lewis, ) twins, born at Audley, 
26 Laurence Fielding Lewis, f Clarke county, Vir- 
ginia, 13 April, 1834. Laurence died in January, 

1857- 
26 Edward Parke Custis Lewis, born at Audley, 

Clarke county, Virginia, 7 Feb., 1837. 

26 Charles Conrad Lewis, born at Audley, Clarke 

county, Virginia, in Oct., 1840, and died in Mar. 

1859. 



268 WASHINGTON. 

26 H. L. Daingerfield Lewis, born at Audley, Clarke 
county, Virginia, 25 April, 1843. 

Mrs. Lorenzo Lewis, now (1878) resides at Audley, 
Virginia. 

26 Edward Parke Custis Lewis (above), removed in 
1869 to, and now (1878) resides at Hoboken, New Jersey. 
He is a member of the New Jersey Assembly. He was 
married, first, in Clarke county Virginia, to Lucy Bel- 
main Ware, daughter of Colonel Josiah William Ware, of 
Clarke county, Virginia, by whom he had five children: 

27 Eleanor Angela Lewis, died at Frederick sburgh, 
Virginia, in Feb., i860. 

27 Laurence Fielding Lewis, died at Audley, Clarke 

county, Virginia. 
27 John Glopell Ware Lewis, died at Audley, Clarke 

county, Virginia. 
27 Edward Parke Custis Lewis, died at Audley, 

Clarke county, Virginia. 
27 Lucy Ware Lewis, born at Audley, Clarke county, 
Virginia, A. D. 1866. 
His wife died at Audley, Clarke county, Virginia, in 
August, 1866. He was married, secondly, at Baltimore, 

Maryland, by Rev. , i June, 1869, to Mary Picton, 

daughter of Edwin Augustus Stevens, of Hoboken, New 
Jersey. Has four children by his second wife, viz. : 

27 Edwin Augustus Stevens Lewis, born at Hoboken, 

New Jersey, A. D. 1870. 
27 Esther Maria Lewis, born at Hoboken, New Jer- 
sey, A. D. 1872. 
27 Julia Stevens Lewis, born at Hoboken, New Jer- 
sey, A. D. 1874. 
27 Eleanor Parke Custis Lewis, born at Hoboken, 
New Jersey, A. D. 1876. 



APPENDIX. 



GENEALOGY may be considered the mathematics of 
the human race, and serves to identify the indi- 
vidual, or family, of whom a history has been pre- 
served. 

The preceding pages have consisted mainly of the 
Genealogy of the Washington Family, and designed to set- 
tle all controverted points on the subject. The following 
pages will contain scraps of history in regard to members 
found in the line of descent from Odin, of sufficient import- 
ance to interest the general reader. 

It will be observed, that the succession is complete 
and unbroken in thirty-two generations, from Odin, the 
Founder of Scandinavia, B. C. 70, down to Earl Thorfin, 
one of the " Lords of the Isles," Founder of the Washing- 
ton Family, in England, circa A. D. 1000 ; from whom 
the line of descent is also complete and unbroken, in 
twenty-three generations, down to the first President of 
the United States, embracing a period of about eighteen 
centuries. 

For about nine hundred )'ears prior to Thorfin, there 
are no controversies, but in the tenth and eleventh centu- 
ries there is considerable confusion among the Genealo- 
gists, owing to their anxiety to identify a number of indi- 
viduals as belonging to our Washington Family, on account 
of a similarity of cognomen. They took advantage of the 



270 APPENDIX. 

fact that in those (and all preceding) centuries there were 
no surnames ; and hence, many bearing tlie names of de 
Wass, d'Oulston, de Weston, de Walston, de Wessington. 
de Walsingham, de Weiston, de Weisington, &c., ad infini- 
tum, all derived from the names of the places or locality 
where they resided (as proved by the prefix " de," before their 
names, signifying of), and changed in cases of removal, or 
the names of the new places added, instances of which are 
frequently met with in Genealogical history. These 
names have been merged into the Genealogy as Washing- 
tons, to prove that the family was of Saxon origin. Others 
have endeavored to prove, from a similarity of names, that 
the ancestors of the Washingtons in England were de- 
scended from the Dukes of Brittany, in France, and the- 
Earls of Richmondshire, in England. By carefully follow- 
ing our line of descent, it will be seen that all these ambi- 
tious Genealogists had no other basis for their assertions 
than analogy, supposition and inference. 

The simple, brief, and efficient manner of preserving the. 
identity and derivation of individuals, pursued in the An- 
cient Cartularies of the Monks in the Monasteries and 
Abbeys (pages 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13), has been the means 
of tracing accurately the line of succession. Thus Alet fil 
(son of) Bodin, Henry fil Bardolf, Akary fil Bardolf, Her- 
vey jitz (son of) Akaris (page 5), and Robert fil Akary de 
Ashton (page 9), /. e., Robert, the son of Akary, or Akaris, 
of the Manor of Ashton, at Kirkby, in Ravenswarth, York- 
shire. 

Having settled the Genealogy of the Washington Family 
on a firm, authentic and rational foundation, Ave may pro- 
ceed to give some of the historical narrations. 

" Biography is the record of persons : History, of events. 
In their more perfect form the two studies are seen to- 
blend together, rather than encroach upon each other. 
History relieving the dryness of Genealogy by the attrac- 
tive narration of events, and Biography, by its minute de- 



APPENDIX. 271 

scription of persons, imparts a deeper, and, as it were, a 
more dramatic interest to History. 

3 Fryer, surnamed Yngve. after his father, Yngve, or 
Niord (page vii.), the son of Odin, succeeded to the Gov- 
ernment of Sweden on the death of his father, B. C. 20. 
He reigned thirty years, and died A. D. 10. His son 
was : 

4 FiOLNER, who became Governor in Sweden, A. D. 
10. 

Fryer removed his capitol from Sigtuna to Upsala, 
where he is said to have built a palace, and a magnificent 
temple, which he surrounded with a chain of gold, and 
endowed with considerable wealth in lands and othei* 
revenues. He adopted the surname of Yngve. and hence 
the sacred race of the Ynglings derived their historical 
appellation. 

4 FiOLNER (who died A. D. 41) was the son of Freyer 
(who died A. D. 10), the son of Yngve or Niord (page 
vii.). King of Sweden, who reigned at Upsala, and died 
B. C. 20, second son of Odin (page v.). He reigned in 
Sweden four years, not as King, but as Drotter, or Lord 
of Sweden. He lost his life in a remarkable manner, 
A. D. 14, and was succeeded by his son Visbur. "He was 
drowned in a large vat of mead, into which he had stum- 
bled while under the dominion of liquor. His three 
immediate successors perished by violent means ; the 
fourth, Donald, was slain by the advice of his council- 
lors, under the superstitious idea that a severe famine 
which afflicted the country could only be removed by 
sprinkling the altars of the offended deities at Upsala, 
with blood of their King. War was the principal occu- 
pation of their reign, and numerous bloody battles were 
fought in repressing the incessant piracies of the neigh- 



272 APPENDIX. 

boring nations. Yet several of them were distinguished 
for their encouragement of civilization and social im- 
provement." 
Fiolner had three sons, viz.: 

5 ViSBUR, who succeeded his father, A. D. lo. 
5 Donald, who succeeded his brother, A. D. 98, 
5 DoMAR, who succeeded his brother, A. D. 130. 
The successor of Fiolner was his son 
5 ViSBUR, who reigned in Sweden eighty-four years, and 

died, A. D. 98, when he was succeeded by his brother : 

5 Donald, who reigned in Sweden thirty-two years, and 

died, A. D. 130, when he was succeeded by his brother: 

5 Domar, who reigned in Sweden thirty-two years, and 
died, A. D. 162, when he was succeeded by his nephew. 

6 Dyggve, the son of Visbur (obit A. D. 98). the son of 
Fiolner (obit A. D. 14), the son of Fryer (obit A. D. 10), 
the son of Yngve or Niord (obit B. C. 20), the son of 
Odin (page v.), succeeded to his uncle Domar, as King 
of Sweden at Upsala, A. D. 162, and reigned thirty years. 
His wife was sister of Dan Mykillati (page viii.). His 
son was : 

7 Dag Spaker. 

Dyggve is alleged to have been the first that assumed the 
regal title, his predecessors being merely called " Drottar," 
or " Lord," and their queens Drottingar. 

The son of Dyggve was named : 

7 Dag Spaker, who succeeded to the government of Swe- 
den at the death of his father, A. D. 190. He reigned 
thirty years, and died, A. D. 220. His son was : 

8 Agne. 

8 Agne, the son of Dyggve (above) succeeded to the throne 
of Sweden, at the death of his father at Upsala, A. D. 220, 
and reigned forty years. He died, A. D. 260. He had two 
sons, Alrekand Eric. He was succeeded by his sons: 



APPENDIX. 273 

9 Alrek, ) . , 

V in the government of Sweden. 

"At the death of Agne, A. D. 260, the Kingdom, which 
had hitherto remained entire, was shared between his two 
sons, Alrek and Eric — an unwise policy, which had the 
effect of dividing the prerogatives as well as the dominions 
of the crown among a multitude of provincial chiefs, who 
assumed an independent authority." 

9 Alrek, the first son of Agne, succeeded to the govern- 
ment of Sweden at the death of his father, A. D. 260, and 
reigned twenty years. He joined with him his brother 

9 Eric, in the Kingdom. At the death of Alrek, A. D. 
280, his son Yngve (named after his ancestor Yngve or 
Niord, the son of Odin), succeeded him in the Kingdom. 

Alrek had two sons : 

10 Yngve, who succeeded him, and, 
10 Alf. 

10 Yngve II., first son of Alrek, succeeded to the govern- 
ment of Sweden, at the death of his father, A. D. 280, and 
reigned twenty •ears. He died, A. D. 300, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son, 

11 HujLECK, who reigned but two years. He died A. D. 
302. Hujleck had two sons : 

12 jornsider. 
12 Erik. 

12 Jornsider, first son of Hujlek, succeeded to the gov- 
ernment of Sweden, at the death of his father, A. D. 302, 
and reigned 10 years. " He was deposed, A. D. 312, 
when the prerogatives as well as the dominions of che 
Crown became divided among a multitude of provincial 
Chiefs, who assumed an independent authority." 

This state of anarchy continued for above a century, 
18 



2 74 APPENDIX. 

when the old Dynasty was restored in the person of a de- 
scendant (probably grandson) of Jornsider, named, 

13 AuN HiNK GAMLE, who had a peaceful reign and died A. 
D. 448. He was succeeded by his son, 

14 Egil Tunnedolgi, who reigned eight years. He died 
A. D. 456, and was succeeded by his son, 

15 Ottar Vendilkraka, who reigned four years. He 
died A. D. 460, when he was succeeded by his son. 

16 Adils, son of Ottar Vendilkraka, succeeded to the 
throne of Sweden, at the death of his father, A. D. 460. 
His wife was named Yrsa. His son and successor was 
named : 

17 Eystein, who became King of Sweden, A. D. 505. 

" Adils was involved in a protracted quarrel with the 
Norwegians, which was at length terminated in his favor 
by a pitched battle on the Lake Wener, the two armies 
being drawn upon its frozen surface." 

Adils reigned forty-five years, and died A. D. 505, and 
was succeeded by his son, 

17 Eystein, who reigned twenty-six years, and died A. D. 
531, when he was succeeded by his son, 

18 Yngvar, who reigned fourteen years, and died A. D. 
545, when he was succeeded by his son, 

19 Onund Braut, who became King of Sweden, as suc- 
cessor of his father, Yngvar, A. D, 545, reigned twenty 
years, and died A. D. 565. 

Onund received the name of Braut (the road-maker), 
from his exertions in draining marshes, extending cultiva- 
tion, and opening up channels of intercourse to every 
province in the kingdom. 



APPENDIX. 275 

The hereditary occupant of the throne at Upsala con- 
tinued to enjoy a pre-eminence in dignity and power, until 
the fatal reign of Ingiald Illrada, son of Frode VII. 
(page X.), when the hallowed sceptre was transferred from 
the line of the Ynglings to that of the Skioldungs in the 
earlier part of the seventh century (A. D. 630). 

Onund having died without issue, the throne of Sweden 
became the hereditary right of Denmark, and reverted to 
the Skioldungs in the person of Frode VII. (page x.), 
whose younger son Ingiald proceeded to Upsala to take 
possession of the Kingdom, A. D. 565., 

Ingiald Illrada, son of Frode VII., or Olaf (page x.), be- 
came King of Sweden, at Upsala, at the death of Onund 
Braut, A. D. 565. He reigned 65 years, and lost his life, 
A. D. 630. 

" That Prince, when young, is said to have been of gentle 
disposition, but being vanquished in some juvenile con- 
test, such as the sons of the nobility were then accustomed 
to display at their annual festivals, the Saga relates that 
in order to alter his temper he was fed with wolves' hearts. 
Judging from his future actions, this regimen appears to 
have had the desired effect. 

" His long reign, from its commencement to its close, was 
a series of cruel and lawless atrocities. It was the ancient 
custom at the Royal inauguration (which always took place 
at the funeral of the deceased Prince), for the next heir to 
seat himself on the lowest step of the vacant throne, in the 
midst of the grandees, until presented with a huge ox horn 
filled with wine. After taking the usual oaths he drank off 
the liquor, mounted the chair of State, and was proclaimed 
amidst the shouts of the people. This initiatory rite 
Ingiald accompanied with the additional ceremony of 
swearing, before draining the mystic cup, that he would 
either double the extent of his Kingdom, or perish in the 
attempt. The fulfillment of his vow led to those acts of 
treachery and murder which procured him the name of 



276 APPENDIX. 

Ili.rada (the deceitful), and ultimately occasioned his own 
destruction. 

" Fire and sword were employed to exterminate the chiefs 
and nobles, many of whom were consumed in the flames 
of the palace, where they had been hospitably entertained 
by their perfidious sovereign. Twelve princes in Sweden 
fell victims to the rapacity of the tyrant, who seized their 
possessions, and added them to the dominions of the crown. 
But a just retribution awaited the perpetration of his 
crimes. His daughter Asa had been given in marriage to 
GuDROD, the Gothic King of Seania ; at her instigation, he 
assassinated his brother, Halfdan III., of Denmark, A. D. 
580 (page X.), and was afterwards himself cut ofif in a plot,, 
by the artifices of his own wife. Having sacrificed her 
husband she fled to the court of Upsala, where she became 
an accomplice in the death of her father. Ivar Vidfadme 
(page xi.), son of Halfdan IH., had invaded Sweden, A. D. 
630, with a powerful host, to avenge the murder of his 
kindred. His ravages filled the guilty Ingiald with terror 
and despair. As the victorious foe approached, he was 
entertaining his courtiers at a grand banquet ; when, find- 
ing it impossible to resist or make his escape, he resolved, 
with the aid and advice of his daughter, to terminate his 
life by setting fire to the hall. 

"Olaf, his son, unable to repel the invaders, was driven 
into exile. Passing to the westward of the Wener Lake, he 
settled, with the few companions, that still adhered to his 
standard, in the province of Wermeland ; there he hewed 
down the immense forests, hence his name of Traetelia (the 
tree-cutter), and laid the basis of a new kingdom, where, in 
short time, the star of the Ynglings rose again with more 
than its ancient splendor in the person of Harald Haar- 
FAGER, founder of the Norwegian Monarchy." 

barons of briquebec. 
Robert Turstain (see Introduction, page xvi.), the first 



APPENDIX. -77 

Baron, had two sons : Anselec, ancestor of the Barons of 
Bee, and Aunsfred the Dane. The latter had two sons : 
Turstain Goz (ancestor of the house of Averanches, Earls 
of Chester, in England), and William. The latter was 
Baron of Bee, and ancestor of the Barons of Bec-Crespin. 
His son, or grandson, Gilbert Crepon, Baron of Bee, and 
' Castellan de Tillierers, aided in founding the Abbey of Bee. 
He had sons, William and Gilbert. William the 2nd of 
Bee, 1054, came to England in 1066. He had ist William 
(see family of Mitford), and Milo De Wallingford, 1086, 
who left a son William. 

From the ancestor, Harold Blatrand, Duke Rollo, after- 
ward Bertrand, this family derive their origin. 

BARDOLF. 

1 William Bardolf, probable grandson of Bardolf fil 
Thorfin (page 4), was Sheriff of the counties of Norfolk 
and Suffolk, in 16 Henry H. (1169), and from that time 
to 21 Henry H. (1174) inclusive. He had two sons: 

2 Thomas Bardolf, below. 

2 Hugh Bardolf, of whom hereafter. 

2 Thomas Bardolf, in 18 Henry \\. (1171), upon levying 
the Scutage of such Barons as did not then attend the 
King into Ireland, nor send soldiers, or money for that 
service, paid ^^cxxv. for the Scutage of those Knights' 
Fees, which formerly did belong to Raphe Hanselyn, 
a Baron in Nottinghamshire, whose daughter and heir, 
called Rose, he had taken to wife. 

This Thomas Bardolf obtained from William, brother to 
King Henry H., the Lordship of Bradewell (in Essex), to 
hold to himself and his heirs, by the service of one 
Kniglit's Fee ; three parts of which Lordship he gave in 
marriage to his three daughters. The first married to 
Robert de St. Remegio ; the second to William Bacun ; 



278 APPENDIX. 

the third to Baldwin de Thone. Thomas Bardolf had two 
sons : 

3 DouN Bardolf, below. 

3 William Bardolf, of whom hereafter. 
To Thomas Bardolf, succeeded his son and heir, by her 
the said Rose. 

3 DouN Bardolf, who married Beatrix, daughter and heir 
to William de Warren, of Wirmegay, in Norfolk (whereby 
the Barons 6f Wirmegay came to this family of Bardolf). 
He died in 11 John (1210). Which Beatrix then surviv- 
ing, had the Lordship of Kiskynton assigned for her 
Dower ; and gave three thousand and one hundred Marks 
to the King, for livery of her father's lands belonging to 
her husband ; as also that she might not be compelled to 
marry again. 

This Doun and Beatrix left issue : 

4 William Bardolf, who, in 17 John (1215), had Livery 
of all his lands, and in 26 Henry HL (1241), amongst 
other of the great men of that time, attended the king in 
person, in that expedition which he then made into 
France ; and obtained such favor for his services there 
done, that of all the debts he owed, unto the Exchequer, 
as well those which were due from William de Warren, 
his grandfather, as those from Beatrix, his mother, fifty 
Marks per annum was accepted, until they should be 
fully paid. 

In 27 Henry \\\. (1242), he had Livery of the Honour of 
Wirmegay, which, during his minority, had been in the 
hands of Hubert de Burgh, sometime Earl of Kent. And 
in 28 Henry HL (1243), obtained the King's charter for a 
market at Wirmegay, on the Monday every week ; as also 
a Fair every year at his Lordship of Stowe, upon the day 
and morrow after the Feast of the Holy Trinity. 

In 29 Henry III. (1244), upon collection of the Aid then 



APPENDIX. 



279 



levied for marriage of the King's eldest daughter, he paid 
xiv^ \5. for the Knight's Fees he then held, which were 
xiv and a fourth part, and in 38 Henry III. (1253), upon 
•collection of the Aid for making the King's eldest son 
Knight, accounted xxviii^ x^. for the same Knight's Fees, 
but by reason he was then going to the King, he had 
respite for part of that sum. 

In which year also he obtained a Charter for Free-warren 
throughout all the lordships and lands whereof he was 
then possessed, viz. : Wirmegay, Westbrigg, Lotenhill, 
Watlington, Thorpe, Festome, Sechie I'Estowe, Wynebodes- 
iham, Dunham, Welbes, Kungetone, another Sechie, West- 
weniz, Herdwike, Biddeltone, Halgane, Wyneberg, Inkes- 
ham, Westfeld, Batestal, Thurston, Lerabeston, and 
Keymestone in Norfolk ; Kyskinton, Digeby, Levesing- 
hara, Blokesham, Amevvik, Latelmund, Blanchewill, West- 
burg, Dedinton, Stebinton, and Thorpe in Lincolnshire ; 
Sheleford in Nottinghamshire; Okebror and Eleton in 
Derbyshire; Plumpthon, Winpelesfield, Lindeskeld, Had- 
leg, Standen, Poleston, Ardingeley, Pipesteye, Bercamp, 
and Flefang, in Sussex. 

In 41 Henry III. (1256), he attended the King in his ex- 
pedition into Wales. And in 42 Henry III. (1257), was 
made Governor of Nottingham Castle. So also in 47 
Henry III. (1262). After which, viz., in 48 Henry III. (1263), 
in that great Insurrection of the Barons, adhering to the 
King, he was taken prisoner with him in that fatal battle 
of Lewes, and died in 4 Edward I. (1277), as it seems, for 
■then his son and heir : 

5 William Bardolf, doing homage, had Livery of all his 
lands, lying in the counties of Leicester, Lincoln, Not- 
tingham, Norfolk and Sussex ; the King accepting of his 
Relief (which was cl;^), by 1;,^ per annum. 
Which William being personally in that expedition into 

Wales, 10 Edward I. (1283), had scutage of all his tenants 



c8o APPENDIX. 

that held of him by Military Service, and about two years 
following obtained the King's Charter for a Market at his 
Mannor of Halluton, in Leicestershire, to be kept upon the 
Tuesday every Week ; with two Fairs every year ; the one 
upon the Eve, Day and Morrow, after the Feast of the Nativ- 
ity of St. John Baptist, and two days following ; the other 
on the Eve, Day and Morrow, after the Feast of SimcMi and 
Jude, and two days after. And likewise, a Fair at Tilney, 
in Norfolk, upon the Eve, Day and Morrow, and two days 
next following the Feast of St. Laurence. And moreover, 
a Fair, yearly, at Cauntele, in the same County, upon the 
Eve, Day and Morrow, after the Feast of St. Margaret the 
Virgin. 

By Julian, the daughter and Heir of Hugh de Gurnay^ 
(whom he took to wife), he left issue a son, called, 

6 Hugh Bardolf, born A. D. 1256, who in June, 22 Ed- 
ward I. (1295), having Summons (with other of the 
Great Men) to attend the King with his Advice, touch- 
ing the weighty Affairs of the Realm, accompanied 
him soon after into Gascoigne. 

Upon the death of whicfi Julian (his Mother), in 23 Ed- 
ward I. (1296), being xl years of age, and in Gascoigne, he 
had Livery of all the Lands of her Inheritance, by the 
King's Special Favour, in regard he was then in his Ser- 
vice ; when he had the hard fate to be taken Prisoner by 
the King of France at his Siege c^f Rifunce. 

In 25 Edward I. (1298), he continued still in the King's 
Service in Gascoigne. And in the 28 Edward I. (1301), was 
in that Expedition then made into Scotland. So also, in 
29 Edward I. (1302). 

In 32 Edward I. (1305), he went again into Scotland, the 
King himself, with his Army, being there, but departed 
this Life the same year (1305), the Lands whereof he then 
died seized being these, viz. : the Mannor of Birling, in 
Sussex, parcel of the Barony of Gourney ; Westburgh, in 



APPENDIX. .,81 

the County of Lancaster, with the Hamlets of Dodino-Lon 
Stubton, Stocking, and Thorpe, as a Member of his Barony 
of Shelford ; Kyskinton, in Lincolnshire, with the Hamlets 
of Digby. Lebestingham, Rokingham, and Brauncewell, 
Members also of the same Barony ; the Mannorof Wyrme- 
gay, in Norfolk (being the Head of another Barony), with 
Certain Lands in Surget, Fincham, Stowe and Quine- 
bergh. And in the right of Isabell, his Wife, the Mannor 
of Bures, in Suffolk ; Perting and Plumpton, in Sussex ; 
with Certain Lands in Emsworth, in Southampton. 

Which Isabell, by the consent of her son Thomas, had 
the Mannor of Bercamp, in Sussex : Kyskinton, with the 
Hamlets of Digby, and Lestingham, and certain Lands in 
Fillingham, in Lincolnshire ; as also in Kungitone and 
Scrimpesbagh, in Norfolk, assigned for her Dowry. And 
the same year obtained a Grant from the King, of the Man- 
nors of Watton, in Hertfordshire; Addington in Survey; 
and Emesworth in Southampton, for Life, with Remainder 
to her younger son William, and the Heirs of his Body ; 
and for default of such issue, to her Right Heirs. 

Hugh Bardolf had issue by Isabell, his wife, two sons, 
viz. : 

7 Thomas B.\rdolf, born 10 Edward I. (1283), and 
7 William Bardolf, born 13 Edward I. (1286). 

This Thomas Bardolf was made Knight of the Bathe, in 
34 Edward I. (1306), together with Edward, Prince of Wales, 
and many others, at the Feast of Pentecost ; and had allow- 
ance of Robes out of the King's Wardrobe, for that cere- 
mony, as for a Baneret. After which, viz., the same year, 
he Marched with the Prince into Scotland. 

In 8 Edward II. (1315), he had (with divers other Great 
Men) Summons to come to New Castle upon Tine, at the 
Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, well pro- 
vided with Horse and Arms, thence to march against the 
Scots. His death happened in 3 Edward III. (1329). He 



2 82 APPENDIX. 

was buried in the Priory of Shelford, Nottingham sliire. 
His son was : 

8 John Bardolf, born A. D. 1307. He was xvii years of 

age at the death of his father, 3 Edward III. {1329). 

Whicli John making proof of liis age in 9 Edward III. 
{1335), and doing Homage, had Livery of liis Lands. In 
which year he Marched into Scotland, in the King's Service. 
And in 10 Edward III. (1336), wedded Elizabeth, Daughter 
and Heir of Sir Roger Damory (by that great Woman, 
Elizabeth de Burgh, his Wife), by whom at length he had 
a fair Inheritance, viz. : the Manners of Craneburne, 
Larent, Gundebill, Pymperne, and Wyke ; with the Bur- 
roughs of Warham,and Maymouth in Dorsetshire. 

In 14 Edward III. (1340), he was in the King's Service in 
the parts of Almaine. And in 16 Edward HI. (1342), in 
Brittany. Moreover in 18 Edward III. (1344), he was re- 
tained to serve the King with twelve Men at Arms, and 
twenty Archers on Horseback, in his Irish Wars, 

In 19 Edward III. (1345), he received Command to pre- 
pare himself with Horse and Arms, to go again in his Ser- 
vice into Britanny, being then a Baneret. And in 26 
Edward HI. (1352), upon that apprehension of danger, 
which there was. of an Invasion by the French, was joyned 
in Commission with Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, 
and Robert, Lord Morlee, for defence of the Norfolk 
Coasts. Also in 37 Edward III. (1363), he was again be- 
yond the Sea in the King's Service. 

His death happened 3 Aug., 45 Edward HI. (1371), at 
which time he was seized of the Mannors of Clopton, in 
Suffolk ; Cauth, Strumpesham, Rugeton, Fincham, Stowe, 
Wcrmegay and Quinnebergh, in Norfolk ; Dons, Watton, 
and Stone, in Hertfordshire ; Westburgh, with its Members, 
viz. : Dodington, Coling, and Stubton, in Lancashire ; 
Kyskinton, with its Members, Scil-Digby, Ammyke, Bor- 
ham and Branswell ; Cathorpe, with its Members, viz. : 



APPENDIX. 283 

Trestone, Normenton, Sudbroke, Hambeckand Willoughby 
juxta Ancaster in Lincolnshire. Stoke-Bardolf, parcel of 
the Barony of Shelford, and xxix Knight's Fees, belong- 
ing to the Count of Shelford, in Nottinghamshire ; the 
Mannor of Hallughton, in Leicestershire ; Okebrok, in 
Derbyshire, parcel of the Barony of Shelford ; Addington, 
in Surrey ; with Bereling and Bercamp, in Sussex. 
To whom succeeded : 

9 William Bardolf, his Son and Heir, born (A. D. 1357), 
then, 45 Edward IH. (137 1)> ^i^ years of age, whose 
Wardship and Marriage was granted by Queen Philippa 
(wife to King Edward the Third), in 40 Edward IIL 
(1366), under Sir Michaell Poynings, Knight ; to the in- 
tent that he should marry Agnes, daughter of the said 
Michaell. Which William, upon proof of his age, and 
doing his Homage, in 45 Edward III. (137 1), had Livery 
of his Lands, and the next year following was in that 
Expedition then made into France. 

In the same year he was retained to serve the King in 
his Irish Wars, with two Knights, xxvii Esquires (all Men 
at Arms), and thirty Archers. 

In 47 Edward III. (1373), he was again retained to serve 
the King for one whole year, in his French Wars, under 
the Conduct of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, with xl 
Men at Arms, xl Archers, all on Horseback. 

This William made his Testament, 12 Sept., Anno 1384 
(9 R. 2), being then at Cathorpe, in Lincolnshire ; by which 
he bequeathed his Body to be buried in the Quire of the 
Fryers-Carmelites at Levvne, in Norfolk, and to his Heir- 
male, whomsoever it should be, a part of the very Cross 
of our Saviour, set in Gold. And departed this Life the 
same year (1384), leaving Agnes his widow, who had for 
her Dowrie, the Lordships Wyrmegeye, Stowe, Fyncham, 
Cantile, and Strumpethagh, then assigned to her. 



284 APPENDIX. 

10 Thomas, his Son and Heir, born 1367, being then xvii 
years of age. 

Which Thomas, in 13 R. 2 (1388), having made proof of 
his age, and doing his Homage, had Livery of liis Inheri- 
tance, and within two years after obtained License to travel 
beyond the Seas with xii Servants, their Horses, and all 
necessary Accommodations. 

In 18 R. II. (1393), he was beyond Sea in the King's Ser- 
vice. And in 20 R. II. (1395), had the like License. More- 
over, in 21 R. II. (1396), he was sent by the King, together 
with the Lord Scales, upon some special Service into 
France : and in 22 R. II. (1397) ^^"'"•■s i*^ Ireland. 

In I H. IV. (1399), as Cousin and Heir to Sir Roger Da- 
mory, by Agnes his Mother, he obtained a Confirmation to 
himself and his Heirs, of that Grant which King Edward 
the Third, in 13th (1339) of his Reign (in consideration of 
special Services), made to the same Sir Roger and his 
Heirs, of tlic Mannors of Sandball, in Yorkshire, Halgh- 
ton, in Oxfordshire, and Faukeshall, in Surrey. 

Which Lady Agnes, being afterwards the wife of Sir 
Roger Mortimer, and surviving him, in 4 H. IV. (1402), had 
License to go on Pilgrimage to Rome and Colein, attended 
with xii Servants, their Horses, and all Accoutrements fit 
for such a Journey. Soon after which, she declared her 
will, whereby she bequeathed her Body to be buried in the 
Priory Ciiurch of the Holy Trinity, without Algate, in the 
Suburbs of London, making Henry, Earl of Northumber- 
land, with her Son, 

11 Tho.mas, Lord Bardolf, Supervisors thereof, and de- 
parted this life on Tuesday next after the Feast of St. 
Barnabas the Apostle, the same Year (1402), her Son 
Thomas, born 1372, been then xxx years of age. 

This Thomas, in 6 H. IV. (1404), taking part with Henry, 
Earl of Northumberland ; Thomas, Earl Marshal and 
Notingham, and Richard Scrope, Archbishop of Yorke, 



APPENDIX. 285 

in that Insurrection then by them made (for which 
the Archbishop and Earl Marshal were beheaded, at 
Yorke), was, together with the Earl of Northumberland, 
pursued by the King, with a powerful Army ; whereupon 
he fled, with that Earl, first into Scotland and afterwards 
into Wales. But about three years after, returning into 
England, and so to Threske, in Yorkshire, they made Pro- 
clamation for Liberty to all that would put themselves in 
Arms and joyn with them, insomuch as many flocked in to 
their Assistance. But the Sheriff of Yorkshire havina: raised 
the Power of the County, met with tliem about Haselwood, 
and in a sharp Skirmish, slew the Earl, and wounded this 
Thomas so much, that he soon died of those Hurts, in 
1407, leaving Anne and Joane, his Daughters and Heirs, 
the one then xix, the other xviii years of age. . 

After which, being attainted in Parliament, Anno 7 
H. IV. (1406), his Honor, of Wyrmegay, with divers other 
fair Mannors in Norfolk, were given by the King to 
Thomas Beaufort (his Brother), other great Lordships to 
Sir George Dunbar, Knight, and the Mannors of Shelford 
and Stoke-Bardolf, in Nottinghamshire, with Hallughton, 
in Leicestershire, to the Oueen. 

But the next year following (1407) Sir William Clifford, 
Knight, in right of Anne, his wife, and William Phelip, in 
right of Joane, his wife, daughters to the said Thomas, 
humbly representing to the King, That Henry the Second 
long since King of England (his Royal Progenitor), hav- 
ing by his Letters Patents given to Thomas Bardolf. An- 
cestor to this Thomas, and to the Heirs of his Body, by 
Rose, the Daughter of Raphe Hanselyne, the Lordships 
of Shelford and Stoke-Bardolfe, in Nottinghamshire, and 
likewise the Mannor of Halughton. in Leicestershire, as 
the whole Inheritance of Raphe Hanselyn, her Grand- 
father : and that the said Thomas Bardolf, their Father, 
lately attainted, being the Lineal Heir to the before speci- 
fied Thomas Bardolfe and Rose, the Inheritance of those 



286 APPENDIX. 

Lordships did of right belong unto them the said Anne: 
and Joane • The King thereupon, having a conscientious, 
regard to this their Right and Title, granted to the said 
Sir William Clifford and Anne, his wife, and to William 
Phelip, and Joane, his wife, the Reversion of those Lord- 
ship, as also of the Mannor of Birlyng, in Sussex, after 
the death of his Royal Consort the Queen, to hold and 
enjoy to them and the Heirs of their Bodies. 

Which William Phelip, and Joane, his wife, in 9 H. V., 
(1421), had the Livery of their Purparty of certain lands in 
Suffolk, of the Inheritance of Avicia, late wife of tlie same 
Thomas Bardolf attainted, and Mother to her, the said; 
Joane, Daughter to Raphe Lord Cromwell, of Tatshall, and 
died in 9 H. V. (1421). 

It seems that though this Thomas Lord Bardolf did die: 
of his wounds (as hath been already observed), yet liis Body 
was Quartered, and the Quarters disposed of, to be set 
upon the Gates of these several Cities and Town, viz. : 
London, Yorke, Denne, and Shrewsbury, and his Head 
upon one of the Gates of Lincolne ; for it appeareth, That 
afterwards, upon the Petition of Avicia, his widow, the 
King was pleased to give her leave to take them down and 
bury them. 

Whether Anne, the eldest Daughter of this Thomas, had 
any Issue by Sir William Clifford, her Husband, appeareth 
not, but certain it is, that she buried hirn, and was after- 
wards the wife of Sir Reginald Cobham. 

Of this Family, there was also 

2 Hugh Bardulf (a younger Son to the first Willtam 
Bardolf [page 13] ), who in 22 H. II. (1175) was amerced 
at five Marks, for trespassing in the King's Forests, and 
was Sheriff of Cornwall, in 31 H. II. (1184). 
In 33 H. II. (1186), the King being in Normandy, he was 

constituted one of his Lieutenants here in England, for 

conservation of the Peace in his absence. 



APPENDIX. 287 

This Hugh continued Sheriff of Cornwall, in 33 H. II. 
(11 86), and executed the same Office for Wiltshire, for half 
that year, and likewise in 34 H. II. (1187). 

So also for the Counties of Somerset and Dorset, in i R. 
I. (i 189). In which year he had the Custody of the Lands of 
Fulke Paynel, by reason that he fled, and paid not his fine 
to the King for the Honor of Baenton. And the same year, 
upon the going of that King into the Holy Land, was con- 
stituted (with William Briwere), an Associate to the Bish- 
ops of Durham and Ely, during his absence, for adminis- 
tering Justice to every man, according to the Laws and 
Customs of the Realm. Moreover, in Anno 1190 (2 R. i), 
he was at Messana, in Sicilie, with King Richard, and one 
of those, who, on the behalf of that King, undertook that 
the Articles of Peace and Friendship, which were there 
agreed on, betwixt King Richard and Tancred, King of 
Sicilie, should be firmly kept. 

Upon his return, he was also one of that number whom 
the Pope had then Excommunicated, as Enemies to the 
Church, but chiefly for adhering to John, Earl of More- 
ton (the King's Brother) and those who with him opposed 
William de Longchamp, Bishop of Ely, then Chancellor 
of England, in his oppressive way of Governing (the 
King being absent), but was particularly excepted by that 
Bishop, upon denouncing the Sentenex, in regard he was 
not personally with those that ejected and laid hold on the 
same Bishop, upon condition he would, upon demand, re- 
sign unto William de Stutevill, the Castle of Scardeburgb, 
and all other in Yorkshire and Westmerland, which he 
then had in Custody. Moreover, in 2 R. I. (1190). lie exe- 
cuted tlae Office for Sheriff, for Warwick and Leicester- 
shires, for the one half of that year. So also for the whole 
year in 3 R. I. (1191). And in 4 and 5 R. I. (1192-3), for 
Yorkshire, being in such high esteem with King Richard, 
that in the third year of his Reign, when he was in the 
Holy I>and, and suspected his Chancellor in England, to 



.28« APPENDIX. 

whom he had chiefly committed the Charge of Governing 
in his absence, he wrote his Letter to this Hugh Bardulf, 
and three otliers, requiring them, in case the Chancellor 
did not do as he ought, that they should take upon them 
the rule in all things. From which time, it evident, from 
divers Fines levied before him that he was one of the King's 
Justices for some years, as also a Justice Itinerant. 

In those great contests which were betwixt the Bishop of 
Ely (Governor of the Kingdom in King Richard's absence), 
and John, Earl of Moreton (the King's brother), when 
Windsore Castle (which was the Earl of Moreton's), had 
Siege laid to it by all the Nobility of England, this Hugh, 
being then the King's Justice, and Sheriff of Yorkshire, 
joyn'd Avith the Archbishop of Yorke, and William de 
Stuteville, who having raised a great Power, fortified Don- 
caster, but would not take part with that Archbishop in the 
Siege of Tickhill Castle, belonging to the Earl of Moreton, 
in regard to his special obligations unto him. 

In 6 R. I. (1194) he was Sheriff of Northumberland, West- 
morland and Yorkshire. Howbeit, upon the return of King 
Richard from his Restraint in Almaine, he took the Sher- 
iffalty of Yorkshire and Westmerland, and likewise the 
Custody of the Castles of Yorke and Scarborougli. Never- 
theless, the next year following he was again Sheriff of 
Northumberland, Westmerland, Lancashire, Yorkshire, 
Warwick, and Leicestershires, and sent with Earl, Roger 
Bigot, William de Warren, and others, to hear and deter- 
mine that great Controversie betwixt the Archbishop of 
Yorke and Canons of that Church. Moreover, he was then 
constituted one of the Justices Itinerant throughout all the 
Counties of England. And upon the death of Hugh, 
Bishop of Durham, had the Custody of the Castles of Dur- 
ham and Norham. 

This Hugh had the Inheritance of the Honor of Baenton 
gfiven to him by King Henry the Second (upon the forfeit- 



APPENDIX. 289 

ure of Fulke Painel), and in 8 R. I. (1196), passed it back 
to the King, in excliange for tl:ie Mannor of Hou. 

In that year he continued Sheriff of Westmerland, and 
again executed the same Office for that County, in 10 R. I. 
(1198), and I John (1199). So likewise for Notingham and 
Derbyshires, Devon and Cornwall, for the one half of that 
year. 

In 9 R. I. (i 197), he was again Constituted one of the Jus- 
tices Itinerant for the Counties of Lincoln, Nottingham, 
Derby, Yorke, Northumberland, Westmerland, Cumber- 
land, and Lancaster. And in 3, 4, and 5 John (1202-3-4), 
executed the Sheriffalty for Notingham and Derbyshires. 

But in 5 John (1204), he died without Issue ; unto whom 
succeeded his brother. 



2 Robert, as his Heir, who then (1204) gave looo;^ for tlie 
Livery of his Lands. And for his widow, William de 
Braose gave 1000^ to the King, that he might have her 
to be wife for one of his Sons, to whom she accordingly 
was married. 

This Robert had the Lordsliip and Hundred of Hou, in 
Kent, which after his death were given to Hubert de Burgh, 
Justice of England ; And died without Issue, in 9 H. III. 
(1224). Whereupon his Lands were shared amongst his 
Nephews and Heirs, viz. : Jordan Foliot, Isolda Grey, 
Raphe Paynel, Hugh Poinz, and Maud Bardolf. 

Hugh and Robert Bardolf, had nieces as follows, viz. : 

3 A niece, who married Jordan Foliot. 

"Henry Foliot, with Lecia de Muntenei his wife, Daugh- 
ter and Coheir to Jordan Briset, Founder of the Nunnery 
at Clerkenwell, in the Suburbs of London, confirmed the 
Grant of those Lands whereon that Religious house was 
built. To him succeeded Jordan, his Son and Heir ; who 
in 9 Henry III. (1224), with Isolda de Grey, and. Raphe 
19 



zpo APPENDIX. 

Paynell, performed his Homage for the Lands of Robert 
Bardolf their Uncle, whereunto they were some of the 
Coheirs. — Dugdale's Baronage, v. i, p. 679. 

3 " IsoLDA, who married Henry de Grey, of Codnovre, 
unto whom King Richard I. in the sixth year of his reign 
(1T94), gave the manor of Turrock, in Essex, which King 
John Confirmed ; and by his Publick Charter vouchsafed 
to him a Special privilege, viz. : to hunt the Hare and 
Fox in any Lands belonging to the Crown, excepting 
the King's own Demesn-Parks. 

Which Henry, in i Henry HI. (1216), had also a Grant 
of the Mannor of Grimston, in Nottinghamshire (part of 
the possessions of Robert Bardolf), for his Support in the 
King's Service. And liaving afterwards married Isolda, 
Niece and Co-heir to the Same Robert, in 9 Henry HI. 
(1224), shared in the Inheritance in all his Lands. By 
which Isolda he had issue Six Sons, viz. : 

4 Richard de Grey, whose principal Seat was at 

Codnobre, in Derbyshire. 
4 John de Grey, of Wilton, Sometime Justice of Ches- 
ter, and Progenitor to the Lords Graye, of Wilton 
and Ruthin. 
4 William de Grey, of Landford, in Nottinghamshire, 

and Sandiacre, in Derbyshire. 
4 Robert de Grey, of Rotherfield. 
4 Walter de Grey, Archbishop of Yorke. 
4 Henry de Grey. 
For account of these six sons, and their descendants, see 
Dugdale's Baronage, pages 709, 722. 

3 William Bardolf (son to the first Thomas), which Wil- 
liam first married the Daughter of Almarick le Dispen- 
ser, and afterwards, Elizabeth, the Daughter of William 



APPENDIX. 291 

Fitz William, with whom he had all the Thenage which 
the said William Fitz William held in Hapedale and 
Rokedale. But this William lived not long, for in 7 
John (1205), John Bee (a great Baron in Lincolnshire) 
gave loo;^ and four Palfreys for License to marry his 
widow ; Yet he did not marry her, for it appears, that in 
the year following, she (viz. Elizabeth) gave to the King 
100^ Fine and two Palfreys, that she might not be com- 
pelled to marry, and that in 13 John (121 2), Ivo Tallboys, 
on her behalf, gave xcvi^ i\s. \d. and two Palfreys to 
the King upon the same account. — Dugdales Baronage, 
pages 681-684. 

Whittaker, in his History of Richmondshire, has no pedi- 
gree of the Washington family, and only a brief refer- 
ence to the name, as having a territorial origin. He says, 
" Prior to the Conquest a family residing on the river 
Wass, in Yorkshire, seated at Wharleton and Wassington, 
the names of the territory and river adjoining." This is 
made significant by the same author in an illusion to Was- 
sington juxta Ravensworth (page i), and he confirms it 
still further in another statement. '' In the tower of the 
church in the parish of Wharleton are the arms of the 
Washington family — an old family of considerable note in 
this Parish ; from whence it may be inferred that one of 
them built the tower " (see also Burton s History of York, 
148, 149). 

Wharleton was in the Parish of Alan, county of York. 
The natne of Wassington is anterior to the Conquest. " The 
village of Wassengton is mentioned in a Saxon charter by 
King Edward, in 973, of Thorneby Abbey." {Collectanea 
Typographica, vol. 4, p. 55.) The records of this Abbey 
refer to the manor of Washbourn and Wharton, hence the 
name of Wassengtone. 

It is certain that within this diocese was the manor of 



392 APPENDIX. 

Washbourn, valued at the dissolution of the monasteries, 
temp. Henry VIII. (1509-1547), at ^11 3s. iid., and Whar- 
ton also went as an endowment of the church. 

The Northumberland family mingled in stirring scenes. 
This was a border county, and a theatre of perpetual strife. 
Here a castle was erected and a parish founded. It was 
not, properly speaking, a county, at that period — only a 
territory north of the river Humber. 

William De Bradwell (son of Alet [page 5], son of Bodin, 
the Monk), born about 1135, was contemporary with Rob- 
ert Wharlton, or de Wyssington, and Walter de Wharlton, 
or de Wyssington, in the county of York, who held land 
north of the Humber, in the same county, afterwards called 
Richmondshire. They were called " De Wharlton." Wil- 
liam de Wharlton held 11 bovates of land in Wharlton, in 
Wastyale and Newsam, for capital service. {Testa de 
Neville, p. 406.) Newsam was owned by Bodin. (See 
Whittaker, p. 124.) 

William, Count of Boulogne, brother to Henry II., gave 
this land to Walter, uncle of William Wharlton, in the 
time of Stephen, 1135-1154. 

We find among the benefactors of St. Mary's, York, 
Askettle de Ferneaux (or fern waters), Odo, the Cham- 
berlain, Ackeris (page 5), Hervey fil Akaris (page 7), 
Ribald and Stephen, Earl of Richmond. Radulphus 
(doubtless of Reyne Hall), is called a son of Ribald. Odo 
Dapiser left heirs, and of his descent was Brian AquariuSy 
or waters. Brian had a son Conan. 



ORIGIN, CAUSE AND ACCOUNT OF THE YORK AND LANCASTER 
TROUBLES IN ENGLAND. 

" The York and Lancaster troubles had their origin at the 
Conquest, and their cause in the antagonism of two nations, 
Norman and Saxon, and the two issues were sufficient to 
impel the most disastrous action. Great battles, where 



APPENDIX. 2^-^ 

hosts were slain, were fought out to the exhaustion of both 
parties. Change of owners of the territories, to an almost 
unbounded extent, both in England and in France, was the 
result. The Welch became the staunch allies of Henry II., 
1 154, though only through stipulations, that varied the for- 
tunes of many families, and alienated their estates. Rich- 
mondshire was taken from the county of York, and the 
title of " the Earls of Richmond " was given to the younger 
sons of the Dukes of Brittany. Many of the descendants 
of the governing Saxon families before the Conquest, ceased 
to exist altogether, though, by virtue of alliances with 
remaining heiresses, the names of many of the old race 
survived,* and the names of their Manors (the new incum- 
bents taking territorial names), mingled with the descend- 
ants of the original owners ; and this led to great con- 
fusion among the cognomens of the families, and has 
greatly increased the difficulty of tracing genealogies. 

" It has become customary to adduce or assign the origin 
of the York and Lancaster troubles to the two powerful 
leagues that were formed in the reign of Henry IV. 
(1399-1413), elder son of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lan- 
caster, and Earl of Richmondshire. From the time of the 
Conquest there were two nationalities, Saxon and Norman, 
struggling for existence. This embraced, however, some- 
thing more than a governing ascendency. On the part of 
the original inhabitants, it comprehended the possession of 
their Laws, Manners, and Language, as well as political 
institutions. While there was any existence of these ac- 
cepted as the nucleus of a league, a people could not be 
entirely subjugated. This diversity of principles bore sway 
until the beginning of the 'Wars of the Roses,' in the 
reign of Henry VI. (1429-1464), and England was swept by 
the diverse currents as by a tempest, and the contest en- 

* As was the case with Thorfin and his sons Bodin and Bardolf (see 
pages I to 4). 



=94 APPENDIX. 

dured for tlie ensuing thirty years. It ceased at length, after 
immolating at the shrines of the conflicting factions, four 
score at least of the princes of the blood Royal, with 
almost the entire body of the ancient nobility of England. 
Not one of the kings succeeded to the Throne, in regular 
constitutional order. If some Nero of those days had 
made his horse a Consul, it would have expressed some- 
thing of the dominion exercised. To appear in arms in 
favor of some new chief, whose right had never been recog- 
nized before, was the customary alternative. 

"The words 'York ' and Lancaster' revive in the mind 
not a mere picture of war ; on the contrary, a large terri- 
tory constituting a Kingdom, and embracing a field of wide 
political action, and a pristine grandeur of achievement. 
York county seemed a land of destiny, echoing on every 
side with the solution of fearful problems. What was the 
assured advantage accruing from so many changes ? What 
were the promptings of so many sad events? Why should 
one portion of a people become so vividly alive to a need 
of defence from another portion ? It could only have been 
a strong faith, that in the issues involved, was a remedy 
for all social wrongs, bad laws, and abuses. The test of 
law was a final solution of the political problem. 

" The Kings of England, from the fall of the Plantagenets, 
accompanied their efforts of rule with peculiar character- 
istics. The people could not do anything for them, nor 
■with them, nor without them. Their Regal services were 
necessary, but not valuable ; they would not employ the 
aid of others to give them higher importance, always op- 
posing this duty whenever the influence was to be super- 
seded by subsidiary eminence. They brooked no control by 
others, and would exercise none exceptionably themselves. 

" These painful conditions brought together precarious 
contrasts, and very unhappy attendants of force. Cruel 
disasters to families, the best in the realm, struggling to 
make prominent position respectable, and official moral 



AFPENDIX. 255 

■duty, sapped away the vital elements of exalted life. 
The great Councillors of the nation were warned of those 
fatal issues, attendant upon rectitude of conduct. The 
first Tudor dishonored and dismissed the Councillor Sir 
Thomas More, whom his successor sent to the block. This 
corresponded with the act that destroyed the young Earl 
of Warwick, the last of the Plantagenets. Henry VII. 
■acted up to the dictates of the popular will in superseding 
Richard III., though the constitution and laws were vio- 
lated. After the death of Gloucester, the Princess Eliz- 
iibeth was the real heir to the throne, but she was set aside 
by a compulsory marriage with Henry. Her rights were 
invaded and the woman's inheritance ignored. It is man- 
ifest that the leading families — Saxon, Norman and An- 
cient British — were compacted into close alliances at the 
period. Such arrangements were made as best secured 
the objects aimed at, — /. e., the tranquillity of the country 
and a harmony of conflicting interests." 

It is evident that one branch of the Washington family 
was originally allied to the York faction, and the other to 
the Lancastrian interest. 

We attach no credence to reports of the Cavalier senti- 
ments of the Washington Family. That they showed any 
■excessive zeal for the monarchy under the Stuarts, may be 
doubted. The want of love for power without principle 
was hereditary in the family of the Spencers, with which 
family they were allied ; and this was shown in the letters 
of Lord Spencer to General Washington, recommending 
Steuben to the command of the American Army. The 
Washington and Fairfax relationship, moreover, conspicu- 
ously confirms kindred political sentiments. Saxon opposi- 
tion to the Norman rule in England took the form of liber- 
alism, and throughout all the civil commotions this element 
prevailed, until a Saxon dynasty was re-established under 
George I. Earl Farrars, who married Elizabeth Washing- 
ton, was a Shirley, and the Shirleys of the Peak, Derby- 



296 APPENDIX. 

shire, intermarried with the Vernons, of Haddon HalL 
" Mount Vernon " formularizes these antecedents, and it 
accounts for Admiral Vernon's kindness to Lawrence 
Wasliington, while the latter was in the service of his 
country, under the Admiral's command, at the siege of 
Carthagena. 

From the time of the " Wars of the Roses " until their re- 
moval to America, — a period of about five centuries, — these- 
antecedents of the Washingtons bore sway. They had 
weight also in our colonial acts and regulations. They 
formed the Confederative system. They united the colonies- 
and gave national independence to the Government. They 
illustrate the idea that men may die, but principles must 
survive. Washington was not a lawyer nor politician. 
He was simply the arm of strength, which supported legis- 
lative enactments — the embodiment in force of those 
thoughts in council, which had strength enough for suc- 
cess, if they did not solve for all time the problems of 
Government. 

In the reign of Edward III. (1327 to 1377), we find the 
De Wessingtons mingling in chivalrous scenes in Durham. 
The name of Sir Stephen De Wessyngton is on a list of 
Knights (noble chevaliers) who were to tilt at a tourna- 
ment at Dunstable in 1334. He bore for his device a, 
golden rose on an azure field. {Collectanea Typographica et 
Genealogica, table IV. page 395.) 

He was soon called to exercise his arms on a sterner 
field. In 1346, Edwardaw, his son (the Black Prince being- 
absent with the armies in France), King David of Scot- 
land, invaded Northumberland with a powerful army. 
Queen Philippa, who had remained in England as Regent^ 
immediately took the field, calling the northern prelates 
and nobles to join her standard. They all hastened to 
obey. Among the prelates was Hatfield, the Bishop of 
Durham. The sacred banner of St. Cuthbert was again 
displayed, and the chivalry of the palatinate assisted at the 



APPENDIX. 



297 



famous battle of Nevil's cross, near Durham, in which the 
Scottish army was defeated and King David taken prisoner. 

Queen Philippa hastened with a victorious train to cross 
the sea at Dover, and join King Edward in his camp before 
Calais. The prelate of Durham accompanied her. His 
military train consisted of three Baronets, forty-eight 
Knights, one hundred and sixty-four esquires, and eighty 
Archers, on horseback. (Collin s Ecclesiastical History, 
Book VI., Century XIV.) They all arrived to witness the 
surrender of Calais in 1346, on which occasion Queen 
Philippa distinguished herself by her noble interference in 
saving the lives of its patriot citizens. 

Such were the warlike and stately scenes in which the de 
Wessyngtons were called to mingle by their feudal duties 
as Knights of the palatinate. A few years after the last 
event (1350), Sir William de Washington (page 36), at that 
time lord of the manor of Wessyngton, had license to settle 
it and the village upon himself, his wife, and " his own 
right heirs." He died in 1367, and his son and heir, Wil- 
liam (page 41), succeeded to the estate. 

1400. But though the name of " de Wessyngton " no 
longer figured on the chivalrous roll of the palatinate, it 
continued for a time to flourish in the cloisters. In the year 
1416, John de Wessyngton, probable brother of William 
Washington (page 43), was elected prior of the Bene- 
dictine Convent attached to the Cathedral. The monks of 
this convent had been licensed by Pope George VII. to 
perform the solemn duties of the Cathedral in place of 
secular clergy, and William the Conqueror had ordained 
that the priors of Durham should enjoy all the liberties, 
dignities, and honors of the Abbots, should hold their lands 
and churches in their own hands and free disposition, and 
have the Abbot's seat on the left side of the choir — thus tak- 
ing the rank of every one except the Bishop {Diigdale, 
Moiiasticon Anglicanum, T. I. page 231, London edition, 1846). 

In the course of three centuries and upwards, whicii had 



298 APPENDIX. 

since elapsed, these honors and privileges had been subject 
to repeated dispute and encroachment, and the prior had 
nearly been elbowed out of the Abbot's chair by the Arch- 
deacon. John de Wessyngton was not a man to submit 
tamely to such infringements of his rights. He forthwith 
set himself up as the champion of his priory, and in a 
learned tract, De Juribus et Possessionibus EcclesicE Dunelin, 
established the validity of the long-controverted claims, 
and fixed himself firmly in the Abbot's chair. His success 
in this controversy gained him much renown among his 
brethren of the cowl, and in 1426 he presided at the general 
chapter of the order of St. Benedict, held at Northampton. 

The stout prior of Durham had other disputes with the 
bishop and the secular clergy, touching his ecclesiastical 
functions, in which he was equally victorious, and several 
tracts remain in manuscript in the dean and chapter's 
library ; weapons hung up in the church armory as me- 
morials of his polemical battles. 

Finally, after fighting divers good fights for the honor 
of his priory, and filling the Abbot's chair for thirty years, 
he died, to use an ancient phrase, "in all tlie odor of sanc- 
tity," in 1446, and was buried lii<e a soldier on his battle- 
field, at the door of the north aisle of his church, near to the 
<i)tar of St. Benedict. On his tombstone was an inscription 
in brass (now unfortunately obliterated), which may have 
set forth the valiant deeds of this " Washington of the 
Cloisters." 

By this time the primitive stock of the de Wessyngtons 
had separated into divers branches, holding estates in the 
various parts of England, some distinguishing themselves 
in the learned professions, others receiving Knighthood for 
public services. Their names are to be found honorably 
recorded in County histories, or engraved on Monuments 
in time-worn churches and cathedrals, those garnering 
places of English worthies. 

By degrees tlie Seignorial sign of " de " disappeared before 



AFPENDIX. 299 

the family surname, which also varied from Wessyngton 
to Wassington, Wasshington, and finally to Washington 
{^Hutchinson s Durham, vol. 2, passim). A parish in the 
county of Durham bears the name as last written, and in 
this probably the Ancient manor of Wessyngton was sit- 
uated. There is another parish of the name in the county 
of Sussex (Bardolf, Dugdale, 681). 

Robert Washington (page 65) and his wife Elizabeth 
(page 66), spent their last days at Brington, Northampton- 
shire, both dying in 1622, justifying the words found on 
their epitaph : " After they lived lovingly together many 
years in this parish." 

MEMORIALS IN THE CHURCH AT BRINGTON, WHERE THE WASH- 
INGTONS WERE BURIED. 

The tombstone in the nave marks the last resting place 
of Robert and Elizabeth Washington, who both died in 
1622. The inscription is on a brass plate let into the 
stone : 

" Here lies interred ye bodies of Elizabeth Washington, Widdowe, who 
changed this life for irnmortalitie y^ igth of March, 1622. 

"As also y° bod)- of Robert Washington, gent., her late husband, 
Sonne of Robert Washington of Sulgrave, in ye County of Northampton, 
who dcptcd this life ye loth of March, 1622, after they lived lovingly 
together many yeares in this parish." 

" Below the inscription there is a brass shield let into 
the stone, which has still greater interest. It represents 
the Washington Fainily Escutcheon: 'Argent, two bars 
gules; in chief, three mullets of the second,' as it is de- 
scribed in Heraldric phraseology; or, in simpler language: 
'On a shield of silver (or white), two red bars; and in 
chief (the upper third of the shield), three stars, also red.' 

" In this shield, therefore, we have the origin of the 
National Flag of America, and the stars and stripes were 
indeed copied from General Washington's signet ring," 



300 



APPENDIX. 



1622. Mr. Robert Washington (page '65), was buried 
March y® nth. 

1622. Mrs. Elizabeth Washington (page 66), widow, was 
buried March y^ 20th. 

MEMORIAL IN BRTNGTON CHURCH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 

" A tombstone in the chancel covers the remains of 
Laurence Washington (page 78), who died in 1616." The 
inscription reads as follows : 

" Here lieth the bodi of Laurence 

Washington Sonne and heire of 

Robert Washington of Soolgrave 

IN the Count IE of Northamton 

Esquier who married Margaret 

THE Eldest daughter of William 

Butler of Tees in the Countie 

OF Sussexe Esquier who had issu 

BY her 8 SONNS AND Q DAUGHTERS 

WHICH Laurence deceased the 13 

OF December A Dni 1616 

Those that by chance or choyce 

of this hast sight 

Know life to death resignes 

as daj' to night ; 

But as the sunns letorne 

Revives the day 

So Christ shall us 

Though turnde to dust & clay." 

" Above the inscription is chiselled in stone, the Arms of 
the Washington and Butler Families." 

"The Parish register records that a child of Laurence 
Washington (page 79), named Gregory (page 92), was bap- 
tized and buried in Brington, j6 Jan., 1607." It also con- 
tains the following : 

" 1616. Mr. Laurence Washington was buried the 15th 
day of December." 



« 5 ^ 
■a 5- > 

sf 8 



CO 






^1 ^ 

a 5- o 

§5 H 

o- » td 

|S > 

4 S. H 

C3 TO 

■9 5 






■^ 2 ^ ^ O O PI 
> O "^ e"^ ^ P5 

3 



«2 03 ^ * 3: S 

fe^ 2 3 m ^5'5 30 

«V .. ^ 7 "^ 1 ^ 

2 ^ ^ • ^^ •<" 

^ i i 5 o ? I 

U re ►» * o -fj ^ 

S •? 2 5 "^ "» m 

™ H ^ Ifl -< -n C 

^ n 7 ® © § N 




APPENDIX. 301 

" 1620. Mr. Philip Cxistis and Miss Amy Washington 
(page 90), were married August 8." 

WASHINGTON MEMORIALS IN NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 

" Of all the places of interest visited by the Royal Arch- 
aeological Institute on the occasion of a visitation to North- 
ampton, in 1877, few could have presented more points of 
attraction than the tombs and other memorials df the 
Washington Family, still to be seen at Brington, (about 
six miles from Northampton). 

" In the year 1532, and again in 1545, there was a Lau- 
xence Washington, Mayor of Northampton (page 52). He 
was the son of John Washington, of Warton, Lancashire, 
and a member of Grey's Inn. Afterward, however, he relin- 
quished the profession of the law and settled in North- 
ampton, where he rose to great influence. His wife was 
sister of Sir Thomas Kitson, a merchant and Alderman of 
London, whose daughter had been espoused by Sir John 
Spencer, of Althrop. In 1538 he obtained a grant of the 
manor and lands of Sulgrave, Northamptonshire, together 
with other estates, which until then had belonged to the 
monastery of St. Andrews, at Northampton. Retiring to 
Sulgrave, he died there in 1584, at a ripe old age. Two 
generations of Washingtons only retained possession of 
Sulgrave — Robert (page 65) and Laurence (page 68), sons 
of the grantee, being obliged to sell it and retire to Bring- 
ton, where he would be under the protection of his kins- 
men, the Spencers. The house in Little Brington is still 
shown where he is supposed to have lived. Over the door 
is the inscription : ' The Lord giveth, the Lord taketh 
away : Blessed be the name of the Lord. — Constructa, 
1606.' 

" The parish register of Little Brington, Northampton- 
shire, among other Washington records, contains the bap- 
tism and burial of a son of (page 92) Lawrence Wash- 



302 APPENDIX. 

ington, son of Robert (page 65), in 1606-7. The latter died 
in 1616, and his remains lie buried in the chancel of the 
parish church. One of our illustrations represents the 
shield bearing his arms, impaled with those of his wife, 
Margaret, engraven on his tombstone. Near to him, but 
in the nave, is the grave of his brother Robert (page 65).. 
It also bears a shield on brass, showing the same blazon' 
(argent, two brass gules, in chief three mullets of the sec- 
ond). This shield, of which we also give a sketch, ex- 
hibits, even more plainly than the other, the characteristics 
which have caused the device to bg regarded as the origin 
of the American flag — namely, the five-pointed stars and 
the alternate red and white stripes. Robert Washington' 
died without issue. Laurence, however, had a large family. 
The first son was Sir William Washington, of Packington, 
Liecestershire (page 87), who wedded Agnes or Anne, a 
half-sister of George Villiars, Duke of Buckingliam, 
through whose influence the fortunes of the family seem 
to have revived. The second son was Sir John (see page 
88). Repeated mention is inade of him in the houseliold 
books of Althrop, where he and several of his brothers 
were frequent guests. He was married to Mary, daughter 
of Philip Custis, of Islip, Northamptonshire, by whom he 
had three sons. A mural tablet to her memory still exists 
in the Islip church. 

"The Washingtons did not stay at Brington many years. 
The depression of their fortunes was but temporary. They 
recovered wealth and position by a singular marriage." 
Sir William Washington (see page 87) married a half-sister 
of George Villiers, afterward Duke of Buckingham, an 
alliance which at that time was not beyond the pretensions 
of the Washingtons. They appear in consequence soon to- 
have risen again to affluence and prosperity. 

" Colonel Edward Apsley, of the Parliamentary Army, 
son of Sir Edward, had a sister Alice, who married Sir 
John Butler, son and heir of Sir Oliver Butler, of Teston,' 



APPENDIX. 



303 



Kent. His widow married secondly, George Fenwick, of 
Brinkburn, county Northumberland, a colonel in the army 
of Oliver Cromwell. They had two daughters. 

" Lady Alice Butler is called on the tombstones in Con- 
necticut, wife of George Fenwick. Colonel Fenwick re- 
turned to England, and married Kate, daughter of Sir 
Arthur Haselrig. She survived her husband and married, 
thirdly, Philip Babbington, member of Parliament for Ber- 
wick. The last family becomes associated with Washing- 
ton. On the 36th of Henry VHI., 1544, there was granted 
to Thomas Babbington, to be held in Capite in Wigwall, 
the Manor of Wassington in Criek Derbey, late the property 
of Darley Abbey, and tithes of hay and corn in Wassington. 
Thomas Babbiiigton, second son of Sir John, by lieiress of 
Ward, was Chief Justice of the King's Bench, 1423. He 
had four sons — Anthony and three others. The great grand- 
son of Anthony was beheaded in 1586. There was some- 
thing pathetic in the plea of George Babbington, for the 
manor of Washington and the other property after this 
execution. ' Lord D'Arcy, my uncle, promised to re-ac- 
quire the estates and protect the heirs.' His lordship's 
mutilated form filled a bloody grave, and the intended 
beneficence was thwarted. He married a sister of Sir 
Thomas Kitson, and another sister married, about 1499^ 
John Washington (page 47). Cresacre More, great grand- 
son of Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor (connection of 
Richard Washington [page 75], of Ardwick le Street), mar- 
ried a daughter of Sir Thomas Gage, of Furies, Sussex. 
Colonel Henry Gage married a granddaughter of Sir Peter 
Warren, and the sister of James De Lancey, of New York, 
was Sir Peter's wife. D'Arcy Washington (page 83), men- 
tioned in Thorsby's History of Leeds, derived his name 
from this source, /. <?., D'Arcy. 

Mary Woombwell, county of York, wife of William 
Woombwell. Her mother was Jane, daughter of Mathew 
Wcntworth, of Monk Bretton. William Woombwell's 



304 APPENDIX. 

daughter married, about 1630, Richard Washington, of 
Ardwick le Street (page 84). 

We shall see that there was a cord that bound the exist- 
ence of these families together in Kent. After James I. 
confiscated the manor of Bretton, the Woombwells, Wash- 
ingtons, and Wentworths appear, as per Will of Hovendon, 
previously quoted, and there can be little doubt, that John 
Wentvvorth, Rector of Snargate, Kent, 1770, was a descend- 
ant of Philip. 

Thorsby. in his History of Leeds, presented to his readers, 
a pedigree of the Washingtons of Ardwick le Street. In 
that work it is asserted that D'Arcy Washington (page 83) 
married Anne, daughter of Mathew Wentworth, of Bret- 
ton, 9 James I. (1611). 

"Will of John Hovendon, in the Prerogative Court of 
Canterbury, dated 26th December, 1629, proved 17th March, 
by Thomas Radcliff. He locates himself in University 
College, Oxford, England, and mentions, ' My sister, Mary 
Hovenden ^100, now in hands of my father-in-law, 
Thomas Radcliff, sole executor. M}- friends, Thos. Ban- 
croft, Master, University College, and Richard WasJiington, 
overseers.' He gives rings to Richard Washington (page 
84), Mr. Philip Wentworth, and others." 

"Thomas Hovenden, of Canterbury and Cranbrook. 
Will witnessed by Robert Washington " (page 90). 

John Washington (page 88) is first entered in the 
Althorp household books, as Mr. Washington, and is so 
styled in January, 1622-3, but in the following March, and 
afterwards, he is called " Sir John Washington." There is a 
memorial of this Sir John, at Islip, Northamptonshire. In 
the church there is the following epitaph : " Here lieth the 
body of Dame Mary ; wife unto Sir John Washington, 
daughter of Philip Curtis, Gent., who had issue by her 
sayd husbande, three sonns, Mordaunt, John and Phillipe, 
deceased, the i of Janu. 1624." It will be recollected that 
in the Brington Register there is the record of the mar- 



APPENDIX. 305 

riage of a Philip Curtis with Amy Washington (page 90), 
the latter being a sister of Sir John (page 88), so that both 
brother and sister were married into the same family. Sir 
John's connection with the Islip epitaph is shown by the 
fact that he was frequently accompanied to Althorp by 
Mordaunt Washington (page 98). 

When the Civil War broke out, the Washingtons took 
the side of the King, and fought for him with all that 
bravery of devotion which appears to have been a charac- 
teristic of the males of the family. The name of Sir 
Henry Washington (page 97) is well known to those who 
are acquainted with the history of the Civil War ; how he 
led the storming party at Bristol and defended the city of 
Worcester against the parliamentary forces, in 1646. 

We have it on the contemporary authority of Lloyd, 
that this Colonel Washington was so well known for his 
bravery that he became a proverb in the army. 

Lord Astley, who had succeeded Colonel Sandys as 
Governor of Worcester, being taken prisoner and con- 
fined at Warwick, Sir Henry Washington was made Gov- 
ernor and Colonel in his absence. In the Herald's College 
it appears that the last entry of this gentleman's family 
was made there in 1618, at which time the name of 
Henrv Washington, son and heir of Sir William Washino^- 
ton, of Packington, in the county of Leicester, occurs. 
His mother was half-sister to the famous George Villiers, 
Duke of Buckingham, which accounts for his great attach- 
ment to the King. 

In the appendix to the second volume of Nash's History 
vf Worcestershire, there is a highly interesting narrative of 
the siege of Worcester, drawn from the diary of a gentle- 
man who was in the city during the siege. The conduct 
of Governor Washington appears throughout to the greatest 
advantage. His spirit and firmness are displayed in his 
first letter to General Fairfax, who demanded a surrender 
20 



o 



06 APPENDIX. 



on the i6th May, 1646, eleven days after the King had 
escaped in disguise from Oxford. 

" It is acknowledged by your books, and by report out 
of your own quarters, that the King is in some of your 
armies. That granted, it may be easy for you to procure 
His Majesty's commands for the disposal of this garrison. 
Till then I shall make good the trust reposed in me. As 
for conditions, if I shall be necessitated, I shall make the 
best I can. The worst I know and fear not, if I had, the 
profession of a soldier had not been begun, nor so long 
continued, by your Excellency's humble servant, 

"HENRY WASHINGTON, Colonel." 

The King's fortunes were now desperate, but the siege 
was maintained, even against all hope, for nearly three 
months, when honorable conditions were granted. 

Colonel Henry Washington is mentioned by Clarendon 
as having distinguished himself at the taking of Bristol, in 
1643, three years before the siege of Worcester. 

Though the division led on by Grandison was beaten 
(he himself being hurt) ; and the other by Colonel Bellasis 
had no better fortune ; yet Colonel Washington, with a less 
party, was soon victorious. 

Joseph Washington (page 100), an eminent lawyer of 
Gray's Inn, London, Thorsby says, " Is to be remembered 
among the authors." He wrote the first volume of " Modern 
Reports ;" "Observations upon the Ecclesiastical Jurisdic- 
tion of the Statutes to 1687 ;" a translation of part of " Lu- 
cian's Dialogues," and other tracts. 

Toland says that he was the translator of Milton's De- 
fensis pro populo A/iglicana, in reply to Salamasius. {Lt'fe 
of Milton, p. 84.) The translator's name is not prefixed 
to the first edition ; but the publisher states, in a advertise 
ment "that the person who took the pains to translate it 
did it partly to gratify one or two of his friends, without 
any design of making it public, and is since deceased." 



APPENDIX. 307 

This edition was printed in 1693, and it is probable that 
Joseph Washington died not long before. The translation 
is that usually printed with Milton's prose writings. The 
interest he took in this performance indicates the tenor of 
his political sentiments, as well as the fact, mentioned by- 
Hunter, that he was an intimate friend of the celebrated 
Lord Somers. 

He was buried in the Bencher's Vault, of the Inner 
Temple. He was of the Ardwick le Street family, and son 
of Robert Washington (page 96), a wealthy merchant, who 
lived and died at Anstrope Hall, near Leeds, Yorkshire. 

" Col. William Augustine Washington, a distinguished 
cavalry officer of the Revolution, was born in Stafford 
county, Virginia, 28 Feb., 1752, and died at Charleston, 
South Carolina, 6 March, 1810. Designed for the Church 
by his father, Bailey Washington, probably descended from 
Laurence (page loj), brother of Col. John Washington, of 
Bridge's Creek, Virginia. His attainments as a scholar 
were respectable. A captain under Mercer, in the Virginia 
line. He distinguished himself at Long Island, also at 
Trenton, New Jersey (where he was severely wounded), 
and at Princeton. He was Major and Lieutenant-Colonel 
of Baylor's dragoons, and present at its surprise by Gen. 
Grey, at Tappan, in 1778. He was active in command of 
a light corps in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina, 
in 1779-80, and was worsted at Monk's Corner and at Lan- 
can's Ferry ; attached to the division of Gen. Morgan, he 
carried by stratagem the fort at Rugely's Mill, capturing 
a large force ; and for his valor at the Cowpens, where he 
commanded the cavalry, and contributed much to the vic- 
tory. He had a personal encounter with Col. Tarleton, 
both being wounded, received from Congress a silver medal 
and sword. He was active in Greene's celebrated retreat ; 
was conspicuous at Guilford ; behaved gallantly at Hob- 
kirk's Hill and also at Eutaw Springs, where he was taken 
prisoner, remaining till the close of the war. He then 



3c8 APPENDIX. 

married and settled at Sandy Hill, near Charleston, South 
Carolina, the family seat of his wife, Jane Elliott, where he 
was a member of the Legislature, but declined being a 
candidate for Governor as he could not make a speech. 
Upon Washington's appointment as commander of the 
army by President Adams in 1798, he selected Col. Wash- 
ington as one of his stafif, with the rank of Brigadier-Gen- 
eral. Tall, strong, and active in person, he was taciturn 
and modest in deportment, and exceedingly hospitable, 
generous and benevolent. His son William died at Charles- 
ton, South Carolina, in March, 1830, aged 45." 

There were a number of Washingtons in Virginia, who 
were unknown to General Washington as blood relatives. 
He makes mention of some two or three in his will, viz. : 
" To the acquaintances and friends of my juvenile years,. 
Laurence Washington and Robert Washington, of Cho- 
tank," &c. " To my friends Eleanor Stuart, Hannah Wash- 
ington, of Fairfield, and Elizabeth Washington, of Hay- 
field," &c. (page 145). 

They were, doubtless, descendants of Laurence Washing- 
ton, of Bridge's Creek — the brother who emigrated with 
John in 1659. 

Edward Washington, born about 1745, who lived and 
died in Truro Parish, county of Fairfax, whose will is 
given below, dated June 30, 1791, cotemporary with Gen- 
eral George Washington, was probably a great-grandson 
of the above Laurence (page loi), and grandson of his son 
John Washington (page iii). He had a sister named 
Sarah Washington, named in the will of his son, who was 
living Apr. 8, 1813, on the east side of Polrick Run, Fair- 
fax county. 

WILL OF EDWARD WASHINGTON, OF TRURO PARISH, FAIRFAX 

COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 

In the name of God, Amen ! I, Edward Washington, of 
Truro Parish, and county of Fairfax, being of weak body^ 



APPENDIX. 309 

but of sound sence and memory, thanks to God, do make 
and ordain this to be my last will and testament. Imp^ I 
give and bequeath to my son Edward Washington, all my 
Estate, real and personal, forever, and after his decease to 
be disposed of as he sliall think proper. 

Lastly. I nominate, constitute and appoint, my son Ed- 
ward Washington, to be my whole and sole Executor of 
this my last will and testament, ratifying and confirming 
this, and disannulling all former and other will and testa- 
ments. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and 
affixed my seal, this 30 day of June, one thousand seven 
hundred and ninety-one. 

EDWARD WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Signed, sealed and delivered, in the presence of 

Joshua Coffer. 
James Hereford. 
Joseph Reed. 

P. S. — It is my desire that there be no appraisement of 
my Estate. 

At a Court continued and held for the County of Fair- 
fax, i8th of September, 1792. This will was presented in 
Court, and proved by the oaths of James Hereford and 
Joseph Reed, and ordered to be recorded. 

Teste : 

P. WAGONER, Clerk. 

A true Copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, Deputy Clerk, 

21 Nov., 1878. 

There were probably only three children of above Ed- 
ward Washington. His son was named Edward, born 
about 1770, who lived also in Fairfax county, Virginia; a 
daughter who married Mr. Sanford ; and another, who mar- 
ried Mr. Manly. The son's will was dated, 8 April, 1813, 



3IO 



APPENDIX. 



and he probably died soon afterward. He was a widower 
at date of will, as no wife is mentioned therein. His chil- 
dren were as named : 

Margaret Sanford Washington, born in Fairfax 

county, Virginia, about 1795. 
John Washington, born in Fairfax county, Virginia, 

about 1797. 
Mary Ann Washington, born in Fairfax county, Vir- 
ginia, about 1800. 
Elizabeth Catharine Washington, born in Fairfax 

county, Virginia, about 1802. 
Edward vSanford Washington, born in Fairfax 

county, Virginia, about 1805. 
George William Washington, born in Fairfax county, 

Virginia, about 1807. 
Joseph Hough Washington, born in Fairfax county, 
Virginia, about 1810. 
He had a niece, Peggy Sanford, whose father was prob- 
ably Edward Sanford, one of the Executors of his will, 
andbrother-in-law, from whom one of his sons was named. 
He had a nephew, John H. Manly. His aunt was 
Sarah Washington, to whom he gave the land whereon 
she then resided, " lying on the east side of Polrick Run, 
Fairfax county, Virginia, and his own household furniture 
and stock, &c., on farm." 

As Margaret, the eldest child, was unmarried in 1813, she 
was probably born about 1795, and the other children at 
corresponding dates, all young. 

will of EDWARD WASHINGTON, OF FAIRFAX COUNTY. VIR- 
GINIA, DATED 8 APRIL, 1813. 

" In the name of God, Amen ! I, Edward Washington, 
of the county of Fairfax, and State of Virginia, being sick 
and weak of body, but of sound mind and disposing mem- 
ory, do make this my last will and testament hereby revok- 
ing all former wills by me liertofore made. 



APPENDIX. o-i 

Item. It is my will and desire that my body be decently 
buried at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named, 
and that all my just debts, due either by bond, note or open 
account be by them paid without any regard to the act of 
limitation. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Margaret 
Sanford Washington, the following slaves with their future 
increase. To wit : Belinda, Tom Nokes, Joshua, Jemima 
(wife of Dennis Scales), Harriet, daughter of said Jemima 
and Henson (son of Fanny), also a bay filly rising two years 
old. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, John Washing- 
ton, the following slaves with their future increase, to wit : 
Old Lett, Dennis, Corner, Doctor, Susanna, Winny, and 
iinn, as also one half of the tract of land whereon I now 
live (including the mansion house, barn, stables, &c.), to be 
equally divided agreeable to quantity and quality. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Ann 
Washington, the following slaves, with their future in- 
crease, to wit : Jane, John (son of old Winny), Charles 
Scales, Fanny, Flora, Caroline, Solomon, and Jemima, 
daughter of Fanny. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Elizabeth 
Catherine Washington, the following slaves, with their 
future increase, to wit : Daniel, Frank, Ned, Sarah, Har- 
riot, daughter of Fanny, Cato Scales, and John, son of 
Sarah. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, Edward San- 
ford Washington, the following slaves, with their future 
increase, to wit : James Straight, Old Harry, Sandy, Kitty, 
Scales, Linny, Dennis Seals, and Nathaniel, also one half 
of the tract of land whereon I now live to be divided as 
'before directed. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, George William 
Washington, the following slaves, with their future in- 
crease, to wit : Jesse, Duke, Reuben, Ella, Letty Seals, 



J 



12 APPENDIX. 



Jemima Seals, and Alfred ; also two lotts of land in the 
county of Prince William, and State of Virginia, designated 
in the general Plotts by Lotts Nos. i and 2, containing 
400 acres, be the same more or less, which said lotts was 
purchased by me of Wm. H. Dorsey. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son Joseph Hough 
Washington, the following slaves with their future in- 
crease, to wit, Malbourne, Isaac, David, Sinah and her 
child, Rosetta, Rose, Thomas, Person, Julius and Milly, 
also two lotts of land purchased by me of Wm. H. Dor- 
sey, in the County of Prince William, and Stiite of Vir- 
ginia, lying near Baconrace meeting-house, and adjoining 
the lands of Hezekiah Fairfax, Designated in the General 
Plott by lotts No. 15 and r6, containing 271 acres, be the 
same more or less. 

Item. It is my further will and desire, that if any of my 
children herein named should die before they arive at 
full age or without lawful issue, that in such case, what- 
ever they may die seized of, shall be equally divided be- 
tween my Surviving children or their heirs. 

Item. It is my will and desire that my niece Peggy 
Sanford, or her heirs, keep and peaceably enjoy the negro 
girl Lett, with her present and future increase, which girl 
I gave her heretofore, and which she has been possessed 
of for several years. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto my nephew John H. 
Manley all my wearing apparel of every description. 

Item. It is further my will and desire, that the land 
whereon my aunt, Sarah Washington, now lives, lying on 
the cast side of Polrick run, in the County of Fairfax and 
State of Virginia, and adjoining the lands of Doddridge 
Pitt Chichester, and the land generally known by the name 
of the Ravensworth tract, for which there is a suit now 
pending in the Superior Court of the County of Fairfax, be 
sold when recovered, also my household and kitchen fur- 
niture, my stock of horses, a bay filly excepted, cattle, 



APPENDIX. ^Tj 

hogs, and sheep, Plantation and Farming utensils, and the 
crop, and it is also my will and desire that my Exors. do 
as soon as convenient, collect all monies that is now due, 
and that will become due on the first day of January, one 
thousand eight hundred and fourteen, which monies, with 
the amount of the sales, is to be applied to the discharge 
of my just debts. Reserving in the hands of my Execu- 
tors after such debts are dischai-ged, a sufficiency for the 
support of my children, and other necessary Purposes dur- 
ing this present year ; and then the balance (if any) to be 
equally divided and laid out in Bank Stock, or otherwise 
as may be deemed most advisable for the benefit of my 
three daugliters, namely : Margarett Sandford Washington, 
Mary Ann Washington, and Elizabeth Catharine Washing- 
ton, and it is further my will and desire that each and every 
one of my children may have their smith's work done 
gratis by the Black Smiths belonging to my estate, herein 
devised, as long as they may be convenient or wish it. 

And lastly, it is my will and sincere desire that my 
much esteemed friends, Edward Sanford, Doddridge Pitt 
Chichester and Reasin Offitt, do act and I do hereby ap- 
point them my whole and Sole Executors to this my last will 
and testament. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set 
my hand and affixed my seal, this 8th day of April, one 
thousand eight hundred and thirteen. 

EDWD WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Signed, sealed, and acknowledged in the presence of 
Sinah Ellen Lee, Ann Talbott, Reazin Haislip, Mary 
Offitt. 

N. B. — I do hereby authorize my Executors to proceed 
at their discretion to getting Timber, Tan bark, &c., off of 
any lands herein devised for the express purpose of dis- 
charging my just debts, and that it shall be a joint expence 

between all of my children. 

EDWD WASHINGTON. 

Witness : Ann Talbott, Sinah Ellen Lee. 



314 APPENDIX. 

At a Court held for Fairfax county, the 21st day of June, 
J813. 

This last will and testament of Edward Washington, 
dec, was presented in court by Edward Sandford, one 
of the Executors therein named, who made oath thereto, 
and the same being proved by the oaths of Ann Talbott 
and Sinah Ellen Lee, is admitted to record, and the said 
Exor, having performed what the law requires, a cer- 
tificate is granted him for obtaining a probat thereof in due 
form. 

Teste: WM. MOSS, Clerk. 

A true copy. Teste : 
F. W. RICHARDSON, Deputy Clerk. 

1878, Nov. 21. 

Laurence Washington, of Belmont, Fairfax county, Vir- 
ginia, probably a near relative of the first Edward, above 
(page 308), and great-grandson of the first Laurence. Also 
probably the Laurence Washington, legatee of a "gold- 
headed cane," in General Washington's will (page 145), 
died at Belmont, Fairfax county, Virginia, probably about 
the beginning of the year 1800, as his will is dated Nov. 15, 
1799, one month previous to the death of General Wash- 
ington (14 Dec, 1799). 

WILL OF LAURENCE WASHINGTON, OF BELMONT, FAIRFAX 
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DATED 15 NOV., I799. 

In the name of God, Amen. I, Laurence Washington, 
of Belmont, in the County of Fairfax, and State of Vir- 
ginia, being of sound mind and memory, do make this my 
last will and testiment in manner and form following. 
Imprimis. I give to my niece Ann Thompson, wife of 
Wm. Thompson, of Colchester, tlie tract of land wlicrcon I 
live, called Belmont, and containing about a looo acres, to 
hold the same during her natural life, without impeacli- 
ment of waste, and after her death I give the same to her 



APPENDTX. 3J5 

son, Robert Townshend Thompson, and his heirs, but in 
case he should die before he arrives at the age of i8 years, 
then, and in that case I give the said tract of land (after the 
death of his mother), to his two sisters, Elizabeth Lund 
Thompson and Catharine Foote Thompson, and their heirs, 
to be equally divided between them. 

Item. I give to the said Ann Thompson all the slaves 
and furniture I bought of her husband, the said Wm. 
Thompson and described in the conveyance from him to 
me, to hold the same as her absolute property. 

Item. I give the said Ann Thompson the following 
slaves, Joe, Aaron, Isaac, Bob. Will, Winkey, Ned, Peter, 
Harry, Sulccy, an-d Alice, to hold the same until the 25th 
day of Dec, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
one, after which period it is my will and desire that the 
said slaves and each of them shall be liberated and remain 
free from Bondage for the remainder of their lives. 

Item. I give to the said Ann Thompson the following 
young slaves, Davy, Hanson, Paris, Anna, Berkley, Titus, 
James, Jenny, John and Jeffrey, to hold the same until 
they arrive at the age of 25 years, respectively, after which 
time it is my will and desire that the last mentioned slaves, 
and each of them respectively, shall be liberated and re- 
main free from bondage during the remainder of their 
lives : And I direct my Executor at the time of proving 
my will, to exhibit a list of their present ages, and have the 
same recorded, in order to enable them hereafter to prove 
the time of their liberation. 

Item. I give to the said Ann Thompson after payment 
of my just debts all the residue of my Estate not hereinbe- 
fore mentioned, to hold tlie same as her absolute property. 

Item. It is my will and express intention that none of 
the property above given to the said Ann Thompson, shall 
be subject to the disposal of her husband Wm. Thompson 
or to the payment of his debts present or future, but be 
held by her in her own right as fully to all intents and pur- 



3t5 appendix. 

poses as if she were a feme sole, it being intended by me 
as a certain support for her and her children. 

Item. I nominate and appoint my nephew Haywood 
Foote Sole Executor of this my this my last will and tes- 
tament revoking all others by me heretofore made. In 
witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal 
the 15th day of Nov., Anno Domini 1799. 

L. WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Signed, Sealed, published and declared by the testator 
as and for his last will and testament, in presence of us, 
who, at his request and in his presence subscribed our 
names as witnesses thereto Lee Massey, Eliz. Washington, 
Robt. Washington, Alexander Wade. 

At a Court held for Fairfax county, the i6th day of 
December, 1799. 

The last will and testament of Laurence Washington 
dec, was presented in court by Haywood Foote, the Execu- 
tor therein named, who made oath thereto, and the same 
being proved by the oaths of Lee Massey, Elizabeth Wash- 
ington and Alexander Wade, witnesses thereto, is ordered 
to be recorded. 

And the said Executor having performed what the law 
requires, a certificate is granted him for obtaining a pro- 
bate thereof in due form. 

Teste : G. DENEALE, C. C. 

A true Copy. Teste : 

F, W. RICHARDSON, 

D. C. 
21 Nov., 1878. 



APPENDIX. 



317 



WILL OF LAURENCE WASHINGTON (PAGE 1 24), OF FAIRFAX 
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DATED JUNE 20, 1752. 

In- the name of God amen. I Laurence Washington, 
of Truro Parish in Fairfax County & Colony of Virginia, 
^ent. Knowing the uncertainty of this transitory life, and 
being in sound & disposing mind and memory do make 
this my last will & testament, hereby revoking & disannul- 
ling all other wills and testaments by me at any time here- 
tofore made. Imprimis. My will and desire is that a 
proper vault for interment may be made on my home 
plantation, wherein my remains together with my three 
children may be decently placed & to serve for my wife & 
such other of the family as may desire it. Item. My will 
-& desire is that my funeral charges and respective 
debts be first paid& discharged out of such of my personal 
Estate as my Executors hereafter to be named shall think 
best and most advisable to be disposed of for that purpose. 
Item. My will & desire is that my loving wife, have the 
use, benefits and profits of all my lands on Little Hunting 
& Dog's Creeks in the Parish of Truro & County of Fair- 
fax, with all the houses & edifices thereon during her nat- 
ural life likewise the use, labour and profit arising from 
the one half of all my negroes, as my said wife & Execu- 
tors may agree in dividing them. Negro Moll & her issue 
to be included in my wife's part of the said negroes. I 
also desire that my said wife may have the use of the lands 
surveyed on the south fork of Bull Skin in the County of 
Frederick during her natural life. But in case of my 
daughter Sarah dying without issue before her said mother, 
then I give & devise my said Bull Skin tract to my said 
wife to her & her heirs forever. Item. It is my will & 
desire that all my household goods & furniture with the 
iiquors be appraised & valued by three persons, to be chosen 



3iS APPENDIX. 

by my wife & Executors, & that my wife have the liberty to 
choose any part of the said houseliold goods & furniture to 
the amount of a full moiety, of the whole sum which they 
shall be appraised to, which part I give and bequeath to her 
and her heirs forever, the other moiety to be sold and the 
money arising applied towards the payment of my debts. 
Item. What I have herein devised and left to my wife 
I intend to be in lieu & instead of her right of dower^ 
provided my wife according to her promise sells her sev- 
eral tracts of land near Salisbury plains, & applies the 
said money to the discharge of my debts due at the time of 
my death, but in case of her refusal then my will is that 
all my household furniture be sold & the whole amount 
applied towards the discharge of my debts. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah, & the 
heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever after my just 
debts are dischai^ged all my real & personal Estate in Vir- 
ginia &; the Province of Maryland, not otherwise disposed of. 
But in case it should please God my said daughter should 
die without issue, it is then my will & desire that my Estate, 
both real & personal, be disposed of in the following man- 
ner. First. I give and bequeath unto my loving brother 
Augustine Washington & his heirs forever, all my stock, in- 
terest & Estate in the Principio, Accokeek, Kingsbury, 
Laconshire & No. East Iron works, in Virginia & Mary- 
land reserving one third of the profits of the said works 
to be paid my wife as hereafter mentioned & two tracts of 
land lying & being in Frederick County which I purchased 
of Col. Cresap & Gerrard Pondegrass. 

Second. I give & bequeath unto my loving brother 
George Washington & his heirs forever after the decease 
of my wife, all my lands in Fairfax Co. with the improve- 
ments thereon, & further it is my Will and desire that dur- 
ing the natural life of my wife that my said brother Geo. 
shall have the use of an equal share & proportion of all 



APPENDIX. 319 

the lands hereafter given & devised unto my brothers 
Samuel, John & Charles. 

Third. T give and bequeath all those several tracts of 
land which I am possessed of & claim in the County of 
Frederick (except the tract on the S" fork of Bull Skin 
bequeathed to my wife & the two tracts purchased of CoL 
Cresap & Gerrard Pondegrass, devised unto my brother 
Augustine), luito my brothers Samuel, John & Charles 
reserving as above an equal proportion for my brother 
Geo. provided they Saml. John or Chas. pay or cause to be 
paid unto my & their sister Betty Lewis, the sum of one 
hundred and fifty pounds. 

Fourth. My will also is that upon the death of any or 
all of my said brothers Geo. Saml. John & Chas. dying 
witliout lawful issue sifch lands as was given them or any 
of them in case of my said daughter's demise as aforesaid 
to become the property & right of my brother Augustine 
& his heirs. 

Fifth. My further will & desire is that after the demise 
of my said wife the negro woman Moll & her increase be 
given unto my said brother Augustine, his heirs, Admors 
&c., & likewise give him an equal proportion witfi his 
other brothers of the other part of the negroes & personal 
Estate upon their paying my said wife one hundred 
pounds Sterling, my intent and meaning is that the said 
one hundred pounds sterling be paid by my said broth- 
ers to my said wife immediately, or soon after it may 
please God tp remove by death my said daughter. Item. I 
furtiier give and bequeath unto my loving wife during 
her natural life one full third part of the profits from 
the share I hold in all the Several Iron works, both in the 
Colony of Virginia and Maryland to be paid unto my 
said wife from time to time by my Executors, immediately 
upon notice given them by the partners residing in Eng- 
land of the annual amount of tlie profits to be paid either 



320 APPENDIX. 

in Bills or cash at the current exchansre as she shall choose. 
Item. I give unto my brother, John Washington, fifty 
pounds in lieu of the land taken from him by a suit at 
law, by Capt. Maxmn. Robinson, after my debts are^paid. 
Item. My will and desire is that my two tracts of land 
one joining my wife's tract near Salisbury plain, the other 
on a branch of Goose creek being 303 acres, my two lots 
in the Tov\:n of Alexandria, with the edifices thereon, and 
ray share and interest in the Ohio Company all be sold by 
my Executors and the money applied towards discharg- 
ing my debts. Also my arrears of half pay which Col. 
Wilson the agent or Mr. Stuart his kinsman and clerk 
be addressed for and money applied to the same use. 
Item. Whereas the purchasing negroes and land may 
greatly tend to the advantage of my daughter, I therefore 
fully empower my Executors to lay out the profits of my 
Estate or any part thereof in lands and negroes at their dis- 
cretion, /. e. I mean such part of my Estate as I have de- 
vised to niy daughter Sarah which said several purchases 
in case of her decease without issue shall be deemed and 
accounted personal estate and be accordingly equally 
divided among my brothers as above provided. Item. I 
also desire that my just suit of complaint at law pend- 
ing against Gersham Keys, of Frederick County for 
breach of trust be effectually prosecuted by my Executors. 
Item. It is furthermore my will and desire that all my 
Estate be kept together till the debts are discharged. 
Item. I give to my wife, my mother-in-law. and each of 
my Executors a mourning ring. 

Lastly. I constitute and appoint the Honble Wm. 
Fairfax an4 Geo. Fairfax Esqs., my said brothers Augus- 
tine and Geo. Washington, and my Esteemed friends Mr. 
Nathl. Chapman and Major John Carlyle, Executors of 
this my last will and testament, whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand & seal this 20th day of June, one thousand 



APPENDIX. 321 

seven hundred & fifty two, in the 26th year of his majesty 
King George the second's reign. 

LAWRENCE WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Signed, Sealed & delivered in the presence of us, Wm. 
Waite, Jno. North, Andrew W. Warren, Joseph Gound. 

At a Court held for Fairfax County, Sep. 26, 1752. This 
last will & testament of Laurence Washington Gent, 
deceased, was presented in Court by the HonWe \Vm. Fair- 
fax & Geo. William Fairfax Esqs., John Carlyle & Geo. 
Washington Gents, four of the Executors therein named, 
who made oath. thereto according to law & being proved 
by the oaths of Wm. Waite, Jno. North, & Andrew War- 
ren throe of the witnesses is admitted to record & the said 
Executors performing what is usual in such cases, certi- 
ficate is granted them for obtaining a probate in due form. 
Teste: JOHN GRAHAM, Clerk. 
A true Copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, 

Deputy Clerk, 
1878, Nov. 2ISt. 

WILL OF BUSHROD WASHINGTON (PAGE 183), OF MOUNT VERNON, 
VIRGINIA, DATED I9 JULY, 1828. 

In the name of God Amen. I Bushrod Washington, 
of Mount Vernon, do make this my last will and testament 
hereby revoking all former wills by»me made. 

Imprimis. I give to my dear & most excellent wife, and 
her heirs the following negroes, viz. Ann, Luisa, & the 
children she now has, or may hereafter have, Sam, Jessy, 
Clark & Silvia his wife and Lucy their daughter, with all 
the future increase of the females, and also Jenny who I 
purchased from Mr. Turner. 

Second. I give to my said vvife during her life, the 
21 



322 APPENDIX. 

whole of my Mt. Vernon land, except such parts thereof as 
will be hereafter given in trust for my nephew, Bushrod 
Washington, & also all the rest of my negroes of which I 
may die possessed or entitled to. . 

Third. I give to my said wife during her life the inter- 
est which may accrue after my death upon the debts now 
due or which may hereafter become due to me, as well as 
the dividents & interest which may accrue and to be de- 
clared upon my bank and road stock, upon my share in the 
Dismal Swamp Land Company, and all other stocks to 
which I may be entitled at the time of my death. I also 
give to her during her her life the Avhole of my household 
and kitchen furniture liquors, so much thereof as she may 
require for the use of her Family, riding carriages, horses, 
mules, cattle, sheep, hogs, plantation utensils, waggons, & 
carts, crops on hand & provisions laid in for the use of my 
family at the time of my death, or fattening at that time 
for such use. The use onlv of the above articles is intended 
to be given to my said wife during her life. Fourth. It 
is my will that as soon & as fast as the debts to me are col- 
lected, their amount, including whatever I may be entitled 
to receive from the estate of my deceased uncle General 
George Washington, in my own right or as assignee of 
Major Geo. Lewis, & on account of my commissions as 
Executor, and all rents due to me at the time of my death 
may be invested by my Executors in publick or other safe 
stocks, the interest whereof which may accrue during the 
life of my wife I give to her. 

Fifth. I give to my said wife all the all the furniture 
ftirniture of her chamber, also the organ and pianos, books 
of musick^ her Library of books kept by herself separate 
from mine, her Jewels and paraphernalia of every kind. 
And whereas there are certain prints hanging in some of 
the rooms which I have given and now confirm to my said 
wife, but which I cannot now describe, it is my will that 
she shall, have such of them as she may by some writing 



APPENDIX. 



l^Z 



under her hand, attested by one witness at least, and deliv- 
ered during her life to one of my Executors, destinctly 
point or.t and describe unless my wife should dispose of 
the organ by will or by some other act during her life, I 
give the same to the person to whom I shall hereafter 
devise the mansion house as it would hardly suit any 
other room than that in which it now stands. Sixth. 
After the death of my said wife, I give to my nephew- 
John A. Washington and to his heirs all that part of 
my Mount Vernon Land included within the following 
boundaries, to wit : Beginning at the Gum Spring on or 
near the line between Mr. Peake & myself and running 
thence the straight road along where the post and rail 
fence, ran to the gate leading in to the house, & pursuing 
the road passing the said Gate leading to the old Ferry 
house occupied lately by James Dorsey till it comes to 
the corner of the fence on the road leading to the Union 
farm burn, & thence along the fence and road leading to 
said barn to the first wattle fence made by Ja : Dorsey, (at 
which point it is my intention to put down a post.) and 
then along said wattle fence, rectangular or nearly so, to 
tlie hist line to the creek, and so with tlie meanders of said 
creek, the river and hunting creek, including the fisheries 
and marslies to the beginning. I also give to my said 
nephew Jolin, after the death of my said wife, all the 
green house and liot house plants and tools or Instruments 
belonging to the gardens. T also give to my said nephew 
after the deatli of my said wife all the furniture belong- 
ing, & which at the time of my death may belong to, and 
be in' the mansion house, Kitchen & other houses (not be- 
fore given to my wife,) in which bequest to avoid dis- 
putes, I mean to include not only the standing furniture, 
but all the silver and plated ware, cut & other glass, pic- 
tures, prints, Table & bed furniture, & in short everything 
used and generally considered as furniture. All the Liquors 
of every kind remaining in the house at the death of my wife 



324 APPENDIX. 

unused by her, I give to be equally divided between my 
nephews, Bushrod Washington, of Mt Zephire, Geo. C. 
Washington, John A. Washington, & Bushrod C. Washing- 
ton. Seventh. After the death of my wife I give to my 
dear niece Mary Lee Herbert, & to her heirs, all that part of 
my Mount Vernon Tract of land. Beginning at the Knowl 
opposite to the old road, which formerly passed through 
the lower field of Muddy hole farm, at which on the north 
side of said road, are or were three red or Spanish oaks, 
marked as a corner, (which spot is mentioned in the Will 
of General Washington,) thence rectangular by a line of 
trees to the back line or outer boundary of the tract be- 
tween treneral Thompson Mason, (now «in possession of 
his son,) and myself, thence with that line easterly along 
the double ditch to the run of Little Hunting creek, 
thence with that run to the gum spring, thence along the 
most northerly of the two roads being that leading to 
Major Lewis' mill, to the beginning. 

Eiglith. I give to my nephew George C. Washington, 
and his heirs, on my death all the land from the Gum 
spring aforesaid lying between the road leading to Mt 
Vernon until it comes to the lower end or corner of the 
field, (N° 3.) in tlie plot made by Genl. Washington, 
amongst my Mount Vernon Land papers by James Nu 
gent's quarter, that was, & the road leading from the said 
Gum spring to Major Lewis' mill 'till it comes to the inner 
and upper corner of my new ground 216 acre field & thence 
with the inner fence of the said new ground field, dividing 
the same from the Mt. Zephyr land to the lower end or 
corner of the said inner fence near the spring, thence east- 
erly along the lower fence of Bushrod Washington Jr's 
new ground as it now runs and crosses the swamp 'till it 
comes to the edsrc of the woods on the easterlv side of the 
swamp to an old road, & thence witli said old road & along 
the edge ol tlie woods to the lower fence of the said Bush- 
rod Washington's Jr. meadow, below his house, and thence 



APPENDIX. 325 

easterly following the fence as it now runs to the road at 
James N ugent's where there is a gate which said lines enclose 
the whole of the cleared land now in possession of the said 
Bushrod Washington, Jr. Also a small part of the swamp 
on the east side of the ditch to the edge of the woods, and 
also a small angle of wood land lying between the aforesaid 
two roads in which stood the school house. I also give to the 
said Geo. C. Washington in fee one half of the aforesaid new 
ground field being that half which lies to the northward of 
the red line run from the corner of the fence before men- 
tioned, near the spring before mentioned called A in S"^ 
Summers* plat & survey of the said new ground field to B, 
which half in the said plat is inarked N^- 2, as by reference 
to said plat and survey, dated July, 1813, amongst the 
Mount Vernon Land papers will more fully appear. I also 
give to the said Geo. C. Washington & his heirs, one equal 
half part of the wood land adjoining the afs^ clear land to 
be laid off by a line running from the road leading from 
the Gum spring to the porter's lodges, northwesterly to the 
old road by the swamp & edge of the woods before men- 
tioned in this clause, the said division to be according to 
the quantity : The other lialf of the wood land here in- 
tended extending to the road leading from the porter's 
lodge to the union farm gate being contiguous to that part 
of the Estate will be disposed of by a future clause of this 
will to the person to whom that part of the land will be 
devised. If any disagreements should arise respecting the 
lines of division mentioned in this Will, it is my desire that 
the parties concerned should submit the same to arbitra- 
tion, and I declare that all the lands mentioned in this 
clause and devised to the said Geo. C. Washington, are 
given in trust to permit my nephew Bushrod Washington, 
Jr. his Brother, to receive the rents, issues and profits 
thereof ^//^r^^/ during his life and after his death then in 
trust for the children of the said Bushrod Washington, liv- 
ing at his death & their heirs equally to be divided. 



326 APPENDIX. . 

Ninth. All the rest and residue of my Mt. Vernon estate 
not before disposed of, I give, after the death of my wife to 
be equally divided between my nephews George C. Wash- 
ington 8i Bushrod C. Washington and their heirs. Tenth. 
I give my Ohio tract of land immediately on my death as 
foUovrs, one equal fifth part to my nephew Geo. C. Wash- 
ington, and his heirs, one other fifth part to my niece Mary 
L. Herbert and her heirs, one other fifth part to the said 
Geo. Washington, and his heirs to the same uses and under 
the same limitations as are mentioned in the 8th clause 
aforesaid, in respect to the part of the Mt. Vernon Land 
devised to him in trust, and the other two fifths I give to 
my nephews Jno. A. Washington & Bushrod C. Washing- 
ton and their heirs equally to be divided : Should the said 
Geo. C. Washington, think it m^ost to the advantage of the 
said Buslirod Washington Jr. to sell the part of the Ohio 
land hereby devised to him, in trust, he may do the same 
at public or private sale, on such terms as he may think 
best, the proceeds to be invested in some productive fund 
&; the interest or dividends to be paid to the said Bushrod 
Washington Jr. daring his life and after his death to be 
equally divided Setween the children of the said Bushrod 
AVashington Jr. who shall be living at his death, their 
heirs and.assigns. 

Eleventh. I desire that all my law books in Philadel- 
phia and a few others left with Mr. Berkham in Trenton 
may be removed to Mt. Vernon and together with those 
now there may remain in the study under the care of Jno. 
A. Vv^ashington, until Bushrod Washington Herbert son of 
my niece aforesaid arrives to the age of 21 & in case he 
should be educated & prepared to practice law I give all 
the said books to him; But it' at the above period he 
should not be destined to the bar or in case of his death 
before the said age, I desire the said books may be sold and 
the proceeds to sink into the residuum of my Estate. 
Wheaton's Reports belong to the United States and are to 



APPENDIX. 327 

be delivered to the person authorized to receive them. 
Twelfth. After the death of my wife, I give all the rest 
4ind residue of my Estate real and personal in possession 
■or expectancy and not by this will otherwise disposed of 
■as follows ; viz ; one fifth part to my nephew Geo. C. 
Washington & his heirs, one other fifth part to John A. 
Washington, my nephew and his heirs, one other fifth part 
to his brother Bushrod C. Washington and his heirs, 
another fifth part to my niece Mary L. Herbert, & her heirs, 
& the remaining fifth part to the said Geo. C. Washington 
& his lieirs in trust for the same uses & under the same 
limitations as are mentioned in the eighth clause of this 
will in respect to the part of the Mt. Vernon land devised 
to him in trust for Bushrod Washington Jr. & his children. 
It is further my will that my nephew John A. Wasjiington 
may be at liberty after my wife's death to take the Gardner 
Phil at his appraised value to be paid my Executors. 

Thirteenth : All the papers and letter books devised to 
me by my uncle Genl. Wasliington, as well as the books in 
TTi)' study, other than law books, I give to my nephew, 
Geo. C. Washington, the books in the cases in the dining 
room, I give to my nephew John A. Washin'gton. 

Fourteenth. The sword left to me by Genl. Washington, 
I give to the aforesaid Geo. C. Washington under the same 
injunctions that it was bestowed to me. My gold watch I 
give to my friend Robt. Adams, of Philadelphia, knowing 
that he will appreciate the gift not for the intrinsic value 
of the article but because it was worn by the father of our 
country and afterwards by his friend : After the death of 
the said Robt. Adams I give the said watch to his son Bush- 
rod. I give Cooke's Edition of Hogarth with the key, to 
my nephew John, and Alexander's victories to my nephew 
Bush : C. Washington. I also give to my said nephew John, 
the two Globes & the busts of Genl. Washington & Neckar. 
The bust of Paul Jones I give to Mr. Mumford for his 
anusuem. My double barrel gun I give to my nephew Bush- 



328 APPENDIX. 

rod Washington Jr. and the pistols which belonged to, & 
were used by Genl. Washington, to Geo. C. Washington. 
Watts' Views I give to my highly valued friend Mr. Jus- 
tice Story. 

Fifteenth. The debts due to me from the Estates of my 
deceased friends Major Richard Blackburn & Thomas 
Blackburn, I hereby forgive and release. 

Si.xteenth : I give to West Ford the tract of land oi> 
Hunting creek adjoining Mr. Geo. Mason and that occu- 
pied by Dr. Peake, which I purchased from Nollet Herbert 
deceased, which was conveyed to him by Francis Adams^ 
to him the said West Ford, & his heirs. Whatever appears 
by my Ledger to be due to said West Ford is to be paid to 
him, & it is my request that he will continue in his present 
situatioa & employment during the life of my wife pro- 
vided she wishes him to do so on the terms he is now living 
with me. 

Seventeenth : Whereas, as Trustee for the creditors of 
my nephew Bushrod Washington Jr. I have made advances 
greatly beyond the value of the property conveyed to me, 
besides being a considerable creditor of my said nephew, & 
entitled to come in as such under the deed of trust, & 
whereas the unsold trust property, that is to say the follow- 
ing negtoes, Nat, Sue, Isaac, Joshua, Tetia & her 7 chil- 
dren, James, William, Nancy, John, Henry, Betsy & Judy. 
Also Eliza, & her two children Warren & Geo. Also- 
Nanny, who have this day been valued by Laurence Lewis 
and Saml. CoUard at the price of $2205, fall very short of 
the amount due to me from the said trust estate and for 
which the said property is answerable. I do hereby give the 
said negroes and the future increase of the females to my 
aforesaid nephew George C. Washington & his heirs upon 
the same trusts and under the same limitations as are men- 
tioned in the 8th clause of this will in respect to the part 
of the Mt. Vernon land devised to him in trust. I also give 
& release to my said nephew Bushrod Washington, Jr., alL 



APPENDIX. 329 

& every sum and sums of money due by him to me, and 
which yet remain unsatisfied. 

Lastly. I nominate and appoint my nephews John A. 
Washington & Bushrod C. Washington my Executors, who 
are to give no security for the discharge of their duties. In 
witness whereof, I have hereto set my hand and affixed my 
seal, having written the whole of this will with my own 
hand this loth day of July 1826. 

BUSH : WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Memorandum. All the erasures & interlineations in this 
will have been made with my own hand. B. W. 

This is a codicil to my will written and dated this loth 
day of July 1826. 

Whereas Chief Justice Marshall & myself contemplate 
publishing some volumes of letters from Genl. Washing- 
ton, all or the most of which are already copied & also 
publishing a second edition of the life of Washington, it 
is my will that whatever sum of money may accrue from 
these sources be invested by my Executor in some produc- 
tive fund, tlie interest or dividends whereof are to be paid 
to my wife during her life and after her death to be 
divided and to vest in the persons to whom the residue of 
my Estate is given to and for the same uses and under the 
same limitations. Item. I give to our niece Jane C. Wash- 
ington, wife of my nephew John A. Washington, & to her 
heirs a negro boy called Lewis son of Ozman & Aggy. 

Item. And whereas it may so happen that my wife may 
die without making any disposition of the property, I have 
devised to her in fee simple, I give to her niece Jane C. 
Washington, in that event, and that only the organ and 
piano forte, together with all the musick,also all the books 
in the chamber book cases and chamber closet, also the 
chamber furniture and the prints mentioned* in my will.- 
All the rest of the property so devised to my wife, I give. 



330 APPENDIX. 

in the said event, to be equally divided between such of 
the nieces of my said wife as may be living at the time of 
her death. The property which I have purchased from the 
Executors of Nob: Herbert dec; and from the Adminis- 
trators of Richard H. L. Washington deed, & which I have 
conveyed to my niece, Mary L. Herbert, for whom I 
bought the whole, and have given her possession, I hereby 
confirm and ratify. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and 
affi.xed my seal this loth, day of July 1826, the whole of 
this codicil being written with my own hand & all erasures 
•& interlineations in the will and codicil being made by my- 
self before they were sig^ied and sealed. 

BUSH : WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

This is a second codicil to my will. Imprimis, my be- 
loved niece Mary L. Herbert having died since tlie making 
of my former will. I liereby give and bequeath all the 
property real and personal in possession or expectancy de- 
vised to her to be equally divided between her two sons 
Bushrod W. Herbert and Noblet Herbert and their heirs, 
& in the case of the death of either without child or 
-children his part to go to the survivor, & in case of the 
death of both without child or children, the whole then 
remaining I give to be divided amongst my four neph- 
ews & their heirs, the part of my nephew Bushrod 
under the same trust & to the same trustee as are men- 
tioned in the 8th Clause of my will : All the personal 
property except negroes, now in possession of my said 
nephew Bushrod Washington on hire I give to him. Item, 
If Bushrod W. Herbert should not practice law, I give 
my law library to such of the sons of my nephew John A. 
Washington as may practice it, & if more than one should, 
then to the eldest, and if neither should, then the same is 
to be sold and tlie proceeds disposed of as directed by 
the eleventh clause of my will. Item. Having subscribed 



APPENDIX. 331 

for 50 shares, in the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal which I 
trust may be paid for without a sale of other property, I 
hereby appropriate for that purpose, whatever ready money 
I may have in any bank or banks at my death, & whatever 
salary may be due to me at that time, & I further empower 
my Executor to apply to the same purpose so much of the 
income of my Estate, or monies he may collect, as may 
remain after amply supplying the wants of my dear wife, 
to whom I hereby give during her life the dividends which 
may arise on said canal 'stock. But if these funds should 
be insufficient to comply with the calls of the company, 
my said Executors may sell as much of my bank stock as 
may be sufficient. In witness whereof I have hereunto set 
my hand & affix' my seal the 9th day of January 1828, the 
whole of this codicil being written with my own hand & 
all erasures and interlineations being made by myself be- 
fore signing and sealing this codicil. 

BUSH : WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

This is a third codicil to my will. 

Whereas the line between Major Lewis & myself from 
the tree red or Spanish oaks marked as a corner and a 
stone placed, thence by a line of trees to be marked rec- 
tangular to the back line or outer boundary of the tract 
between Thompson Mason & Genl. Washington, as de- 
scribed iri the clause of Genl. Washington's will which 
devises a part of the Mount Vernon estate to me, has never 
been run by the major and myself and there subsists a dif- 
ficulty of opinion between us to the construction of the 
said will in relation to that line which my frequent and 
long absences from home have hitherto prevented us from 
adjusting, it is my will that my nephews, the Executors & 
Trustees of my deceased niece Mary L. Herbert, (in case it 
should not be in my power to settle this matter with Maj(^r 
Lewis, during my life,) do as soon as possible Settle and 
adjust with him this controverted line & in order that it 



332 APPENDIX. 

may be done in the most amicable manner, I do hereby 
empower my said nephews John A. and Bushrod C. Wash- 
ington or either of them or the survivor of them to submit 
any disputed point relative to that subject to arbitration 
hereby declaring any award or awards to be made in the 
premises to be final and binding on the persons who may 
be entitled to that part of the land devised by the preceed- 
ing codicil to the sons of my niece Mary L. Herbert in like 
manner as it would were the submission made by me dur- 
ing my life. 

Item. I give the interest which after my death may be- 
come due on Geo. Atkinson's bond until George W. Wash- 
ington son of Buslirod Washington of Mt. Zephyr shall 
arrive at the age of i8 (and which my Executor is to collect 
a.s it becomes due), to be divided as follows : viz. : one third 
to Ann Eliza, one third to Jane Mildred, daughters of the 
said Bushrod Washington Jr. of Mt. Zephyr, & the other 
third to the before mentioned Geo. W. son of the said 
Bushrod Washington Jr. towards his education & fitting 
him for the navy, & after he has arrived at tlie age of i8, 
then I give the wliole of the said debt principal & interest 
with all the Securities for the same to be equally divided 
between the said Ann Eliza and Jane Mildred Washington 
& their assigns. The above bequest is intended to be made 
to my Executors in strict trust for the uses above men- 
tioned & the principal to be paid to my nieces on their 
respective marriages and not before. 

Item. It is my wish that my Executor may add to the 
above bequest to the said Geo. W. as much out of the in- 
come of my Estate as will complete his Education till his 
arrival at the age aforesaid, if in his Judgment the same 
can be spared after paying up my subscription to the Ches- 
apeake & Ohio canal company, & any other debts and pro- 
viding for the comfortable and abundant support of my 
dear v.ife. All benefit under this clause in favor of the 
said Geo. W. t<j cease after he arrives at the af^*! age, ex- 



APPENDIX. 2>ZZ 

cept a moderate outfit which is to be given him in case he 
should be received as a midshipman in our Navy. In wit- 
ness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal 
this 19th day of July 1828, the whole of this Codicil being 
written with my own hand, & all erasures & interlineations 
being made by myself before signing & sealing the same, 

BUSH : WASHINGTON. 

At a Court held for Fairfax county, the 21st. day of De- 
cember 1829. ' 

This last will & testament of the Honorable Bushrod 
Washington, of Mt. Vernon, deceased, together with three 
•Codicils thereto annexed was presented in court by Jno. 
A. Washington, one of the Executors therein named & the 
same being proved to be wholly in the handwriting of the 
said Bushrod Washington by the oaths of Geo. Mason, 
Geo. Millan, Dennis Johnson, & Wm. Moss, is admitted to 
record. And the said John A. Washington having in open 
•court executed bond in the penalty of |ioo,ooo conditioned 
as the law directs, & taken the oath prescribed by law, a 
certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in 
■due form. 

Teste : WM. MOSS. C. C. 
A true copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, 

Deputy Clerk. 
21 Nov., 1878. 

WILL OF CORBIN WASHINGTON (PAGE 186), OF FAIRFAX CO., 
VA., DATED 19 OCT., 1799. 

In the name of God amen. I Corbin Washington, of 
Fairfax County in the State of Virginia, being sick & weak 
in body, but of sound mind & disposing memory, & calling 
to mind the uncertainty of human life & being anxious to 
■dispose of my worldly property in the most judicious man- 
ner, I am capable of for the comfort, ease & advantage of 



334 APPENDIX. 

• 

my family after I am gone., do hereby, revoking all other 
or former wills or Testaments by me lieretofore made & 
make and declare this as my only proper last will & testa- 
ment, in manner & form following to wit, First, it is my 
will & desire that all my just debts be paid & discharged, 
as soon as possible by my Executrix hereinafter men- 
tioned. 

Secondly. I do give and bequeath unto my most dear 
wife and friend Hannah Washington, all. my Estate of 
every kind and description whatsoever, both real & per- 
sonal in possession, remainder & revertion, and every 
species of Estate or property that I have any right to dis- 
pose of by will to have & to hold unto her during her 
widpwhood, & I do hereby authorize and fully empower 
my said wife Hannah, (provided she should not marry) to- 
divide my said Estate among my children and grand cliil- 
dren in any manner she may think proper. 

Thirdly. If the profits of the Estate sliould prove insuf- 
ficient for the plentiful and comfortable support of my 
said dear wife, & the education of my children, It is my 
will & desire that she may let & dispose of any of the- 
negroes or other personal property to raise money for that 
purpose. 

Fourthly. As it is not uncommon for negroes to be- 
come disobedient to their mistresses after the death of their 
masters, to prevent any inconvenience on this Iiead I do 
hereby give my said dear wife full power & autliority to 
sell and dispose of any of them so offending in her opin- 
ion & vest the moneys arising therefrom in other negroes, 
or such other property as she may consider most beneficial 
to herself & children. 

Fourthly. It is my will & desire that my Executrix be- 
not compelled to give security on qualifying to my will & 
that she may not be put to the trouble of having the EstaXe 
appraised. 

Lastly. I do hereby constitute and appoint my most. 



APPENDIX. 



335 



justly beloved wife & very faithfvil & sincere friend, Han- 
nah Washington, sole Executrix of this my last will & tes- 
tament & Sole Guardian to all my children. In witness 
whereof, I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal> 
this 19th day of Oct 1799. 

CORBIN WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

At a Court held for Fairfax County, the 21st. day of 
April 1800. This last will & testament of Corbin Wash- 
ington deceased, was presented in Court by Thos. Lee Senr. 
& the same being proved by the oaths of Edmund I. Lee, 
Thos. Lee, Senr. & Nicholas Fitzhugh, to be wholly writ 
by the said Testator, & Signed by him, is on motion or- 
dered to be recorded. Teste : 

G. DENEALE, C. C. 
A Copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, 

Deputy Clerk, 
21 Nov., 1878. 

WILL OF COL. GEORGE AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON (.PAGE l86), 
OF FAIRFAX CO., VA., DATED 24 JAN., I793. 

In the name of God, Amen. I George Augustine Wash- 
ington of the county of Fairfax being of my usual sound- 
ness of mind & of sufficient recollection do make & consti- 
tute this my last will & testament for a disposition of my 
property after my death as follows, to wit : To my wife 
Frances Washington whilst she shall remain a widow & 
whilst my children are under lawfuU age or unmarried I 
give all my Estate real and personal to maintain herself & 
support and educate my children as she shall think proper 
out of the annual Interest & profits thereof, subject how- 
ever to the discharge of my debts & the legacies & bequests 
in the manner as they are hereinafter made. Whenever my 
said wife shall choose it, whilst she shall remain sole Sr 



336 APPENDIX. 

before any of my children shall arive to lawfull age or 
marry, it is my will that she may take to her seperate use 
all the Slaves which I received with her from her father & 
their increase, and the Lott & house in the town of Alex- 
andria, purchased by me of a Wm. Hunter, to hold the same 
to her & her heirs, and then divide the parts of my Estate 
allotted to my children, among them as hereafter devised & 
directed. And if my said wife shall not choose to make 
such seperation whilst she shall remain Sole & before any 
of my Children shall arrive to lawful age or marry, then 
when either of those events shall take place or when she 
shall marry herself, I give to her and her heirs the said 
slaves & their increase & the said Lott & house in Alex- 
andria. I give to my said wife my chariot horses, my riding 
chair & harness & all furniture of the household kind that 
I may leave not particularly disposed of herein to other 
persons or uses. I give to my said wife one fourth part of 
my plantation, stocks of horses, cattle, sheep & hogs when- 
ever a division or seperation of my Estate is made. To my 
son George Fayette, & his heirs, I give that part of my tract 
of land in Berkley county included in the following descrip- 
tion to wit, Begining at the corner thereof • on the south 
side of Cha^- Town & running along the Road leading there- 
from to Harper's Ferry as far as the said tract is bounded 
by the said road & along the Known boundar)- line from 
where it leaves the said road to where it reaches Hite's 
great road, thence along Hite's road to where it intersects 
with the new cut road leading to the line dividing Eph- 
raim Worthington's land from my said tract, & so along the 
said new cut road & line to the begining at the Charles 
Town corner," which part of my said tract so described & 
bounded contains about 510 acres be it more or less. I 
give to my said son Geo. Fayette & his heirs 1000 acres of 
land situate in the District set apart for the officers & sol- 
diers of the Virginia line, on the Ohio river, which I hold 
by a patent from the State of Virginia, dated the 29th. day 



APPENDIX. 337 

of July 1789. I also give to my said son Geo. Fayette, my 
Gold watch. To my son Charles Augustine & his heirs I 
give all the remaining part of my said tract of land in 
Berkley county not given as above to my son Geo. Fayette. 
I also give to my said son Chas. Augustine loao acres of 
land which I claim as an officer of the Virginia line, it 
being that part of my said claim which is not yet surveyed 
& patented & all my Estate & right therein. To my daugh- 
ter Maria I give a tract of 666 % acres which 1 hold by a 
Patent from the State of Virginia, dated the 3rd. day of 
Feby, 1787 & is situated in the District set apart for the 
officers and soldiers of the Virginia Continental line. I 
give to my said daughter my Lott in the town of Alex- 
andria purchased of Laurison & adjoining the Clerk's 
office, together with four Lottsin the Town of Fredericks- 
burg purchased of John Lewis. I also give to my said 
daughter two negro men named Gabriel & Frederick & 
two debts due to me by Bond, one from Alexander Spots- 
wood & the other from Robert Brooke of Fredericksburgf. 
T give to each of my said children one fourth part of my 
Plantation, stocks of horses, cattle. Cattle, sheep & hogs plan- 
tation utensils, to be delivered to them respectively when- 
ever a division of my Estate shall take place as herein 
before directed or when my said wife shall marry. I give 
to my sisters Frances Ball & Mildred Washington each the 
sum of fifty pounds to be paid out of Estate for the year 
1793, if the said profits shall amount to the sum of four 
hundred pounds, & if the said profits for the year 1792 shall 
not amount to that sum, then I will that only twenty five 
pounds to each of my said sisters to be paid thereout, & 
the remaining twenty five pounds each, to be paid "to them 
out of the profits of my Estate for the year 1793. To Mr. 
Jolin Packett, as a friendly testimonial of my sence of his 
faithful services to me I give the sum of fifty pounds to be 
paid to him out of the profits of my Estate for the year 
1793, if such profits shall amount to the sum of three hun- 
22 



338 APPENDIX. 

drcd pounds, & if such profits shall not amount to that sum, 
I will that twenty five pounds of the said fifty be paid to 
him out of the said profits of the year 1793, & the balance 
out of the profits of my Estate for the year 1794. I desire 
ten pounds yearly to be paid out of my Estate to ray negro 
man Charles whom I give to my said wife during her 
widowhood & when my said wife shall marry or at her 
death (if she shall not marry again,) I hereby liberate my 
said man Charles, & charge the said property which I have 
herein given to my sons (from the time a division of my 
Estate shall be made,) with the payment of the said ten 
pounds : that is to say, the respective portion of each son 
with the several sum of five pounds annually to be paid to 
the said man Chas. during his life. I also give to my said 
man Chas. my cassemor blue coat, striped great coat & all 
my shirts not herein particularly and other wise disposed 
of — I give to my brother Samuel Washington my brown 
coat, buflf vest & breeches, my best blue coat, striped scar- 
let vest & green breecliesSt half a dozen new ruffled shirts : 
I give to my brother in law Col. Ball my double milled 
drab great coat. I give to my young friend Geo. W. P. 
Custis my silver hilted sword. I desire my Executors to 
present to my dear father & mother & to my aunt Martha 
Washington each a ring of five Guineas value to be in 
wrought with some of my hair in token of my affectionate 
remembrance of them : To my dear uncle & friend the 
President of tlie United States, I return the golden headed 
cane whicli I received from liim, I request him to accept of 
my gray riding horse & new saddle and bridle as the last 
Testimonial of my most grateful & affectionate regard for 
him. If my debt from John Lewis cannot be recovered 
within 6 months after my decease & no other money can be 
conveniently spared from my Estate, I desire my Executors 
to apply as much of the debts collected from Robt. Brooke 
or Alexander Spotswood as will be sufficient to the dis- 
charge of a debt which I owe to John Hopkins of Rich- 



APPENDIX. 339 

mond & that the same may be replaced to my daughter 
Maria's portion out of the said debt from John Lewis when 
recovered. 

Finally, I commit the execution, of this my will to my 
said uncle George Washington, and my most affectionate 
& beloved wife Frances Washington on whom I rely there- 
for, with the most perfect satisfaction & I hereby nominate 
and appoint my said uncle & wife Executors of this my 
last will & testament, desiring that my estate may not be 
appraised or inventoried & that no security be required of 
my said Executors at their qualification. 

In witness of all which I have hereunto set my hand & 
affixed my seal this the 24th. day of January in the year of 
Christ 1793. 

GEO. A. WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Signed, Sealed & published as his last will by the above 
named G. A. Washington, in presence of us, who in his 
presence have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses 
thereof. J'- Dandridge, Benj. Bassett, C. P. Lyons, M. 
W. Dandridge. 

At a Court held for the County of Fairfax, 15 July 1793. 
This will was presented in court by Frances Washington 
Executrix therein named, who made oath thereto, & the 
same being proved by the oath of John Dandridge, Burrell 
Bassett & M. W. Dandridge ; is ordered to be recorded, & 
the said Frances Washington, having performed what the 
laws require, a certificate is granted her for obtaining a 
probate thereof in due form. 

Teste: P. WAGONER, Clk. 
A true copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, 

Deputy Clerk. 
2ist Nov., 1878. 



340 APPENDIX. 



WILL OF JOHN AUGUSTINE WASHINGTON (pAGE 215), OF JEF- 
FERSON CO., VA., DATED JULY 8, 1830. 

In the name of God amen. I John A. Washington, of 
Jefferson county, in the State of Virginia, being in perfect 
health of body & of sound and disposing mind, memory 
and understanding, considering the certainty of death & 
the uncertainty of the time thereof & being desirous to set- 
tle my worldly affairs & therefore be the better prepared to 
leave this world, when it shall please God to call me hence, 
do therefore make this my last will and testament, in man- 
ner and form following, that is to say. First. It is my will 
& desire that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid 
& discharged as soon as possible, by my Executrix herein- 
after mentioned. 

Secondly. I give & bequeath unto my most dear wife & 
friend Jane C. Washington, all my negroes and other real 
& personal Estate of every kind & description whatsoever, 
that I now have or may liereafter have any right to dispose 
of by will or otherwise in possession, to hold during her 
widovviiood. Thirdly. I do hereby fully empower my dear 
wife Jane C. Washington, to divide my said Estate among 
my children in any way she may think proper. 

Fourthly. As it frequently happens that negroes be- 
comes extremely disobedient to their mistress after the 
death of their masters, I do hereby give my said dear wife 
full power & authority should any act so unfaithfully to 
her orders, to sell and dispose of any of them so offending 
in her opinion, & vest the money arising therefrom, in other 
negroes, property or public stock, which at the death of my 
dear wife Jane C. Washington is to be divided between my 
children as she may direct. 

Fifthly. It is my will & desire that my Executrix shall 
not be compelled to give security upon qualifying to my 
will, and that she may not be put to the trouble of having 



APPENDIX. 



J4I 



the Estate appraised, also I do hereby appoint her sole 
Guardian to all my children, without giving security for 
the same. 

Lastly. I do hereby constitute & appoint my most dear 
& affectionate wife Jane C. Washington my sole Executrix 
to this my last will & testament, revoking & annulling all 
former wills by me heretofore made, ratifying and confirm- 
ing this & none other to be my last will & testament. In 
testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed 
my seal in my own hand writing this 6th. day of August 
1822. The erasures in lines 7 & 8 on page second I did 
myself before I set my hand and affixed my seal. 

JOHN A. WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Codicil — Whereas, I John A. Washington, in the County 
of Jefferson, & State of Virginia, have made & duly exe- 
cuted my last will & testament in writing, bearing date as 
above, which said last will & testament, & every clause, be- 
quest and devise therein contained, I do hereby ratify and 
confirm & being desirous to alter some parts thereof, pro- 
vided my dear wife Jane C. Washington should die with- 
out making her last will devising my estate as she may 
think proper between my children, in that case only do 
therefore hereby make this my codicil, which I will & 
direct shall be taken &held as my will & testament in man- 
ner & following that is to say, I hereby give & devise all 
my negroes & other real & personal Estate of every kind 
& description whatsoever that I now have or may hereafter 
have any right to dispose of by will or otherwise, in pos- 
session, reversion or remainder, to my sons and to their 
heirs forever in equal proportions to be allotted to each of 
them as soon as they arrive at the age of 21 years, except 
what I shall hereafter devise. I do hereby declair that 
should cither of my sons die without lawful issue the 
property so descnding shall go to the surviving brother or 
brothers. Item. I give & bequeath to my dear daughter 



342 



APPENDIX. 



Anne Mariah J. B. Washington ten thousand dollars cur- 
rent money of the United States to bear interest from the 
death of my wife Jane C. Washington, to be raised in the 
most convenient manner to the Estate as speedily as possi- 
ble after her deceased a negro man and woman not to ex- 
ceed 25 years of age, also a good riding horse, saddle & 
bridje, to be paid to her when she arrives at the age of 21 
years or marries. In testimony whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand & affixed my seal, in my own hand writing, 
this loth day of Sept. 1822, the erasure in lines 7 & 8 on 
page second I did myself before I set my hand & affixed my 
seal. 

JOHN A. WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

Codicil 2nd. Whereas my late uncle Bushrod Washing- 
ton did by will give to me Mount Vernon house and a 
certain parcel of land attached thereto, I do hereby author- 
ize my Executrix or administrator should they deem it 
advisable for my children's interest to sell to the Govern- 
ment of the United States only if they should be dispose to 
purchase Mount Vernon & as much of the land as they may 
want, the proceeds to be laid out in public stock for the 
benefit of my children. If the Congress of the United 
States will take Mt. Vernon & part of the land my Exec- 
utrix or Administrator may sell the balance to any person 
or persons, also all undivided property received from the 
said Bushrod Washington & the amount laid out in public 
stock for the benefit of my children. In testimony whereof, 
I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal, in my own 
hand writing this Eight day of July in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred & thirty. 

JOHN A. WASHINGTON, [seal.] 

State of Virginia, ) 
County of Jefferson, f " 
In the county court. July Term 1832. 
At a court held for the said county on the i6th. day of 



APPENDIX. 343 

July 1832. The last will & testament of Jno. A. Washing- 
ton dec. is this day proved in open courts by the oaths of 
Bushrod C. Washington and Edmund I. Lee Junr. to be 
altogether in the hand writing of the said testator, & or- 
dered to be recorded, & on the same day on motion of Mrs. 
Jane C. Washington, the Executrix named in the said will, 
who made oath according to law, & entered into and 
acknowledged a bond without security, in the penalty of 
^50,000 with condition according to law, the said testator 
having directed that no security should be required of her, 
■certificate is granted her for obtaining letters testamentary 
in due form. 

Teste : SAMUEL J. CRANE, Clerk. 

And afterwards, to wit : At a Court held for the said 
County on the i6th day of July 1849. It appearing to the 
satisfaction of the Court, that in making the entry of the 
proof of the last will & testament of John A. Washington, 
deceased, at July Term 1832. of this court, it was proved 
that both wills & codicils were in the handwriting of the 
Testator, & that the record inadvertantly mentions that the 
will had been proved omitting the codicils, on motion 
leave is given to examine the same witnesses again, which 
being done & it being proved by the said witnesses Bush- 
rod C. Washington & Edmund L Lee, that the said will & 
codicils are all in the hand writing of the said Jno. A. 
Washington, the said testator, the same is ordered to be 
entered of record, which is accordingly hereby done. 

Teste : 

T. A. MOORE, Clerk. 

And at a Court held for the said county on the 12th day 
•of Oct. 1857. On motion of Richard B. Washington who 
made oath according to law & with Robt. W. Baylor his 
security, entered into & acknowledged a Bond in the pen- 
-alty of $5000 with condition according to law, certificate 



344 APPENDIX. 

is granted him for obtaining letters of administration de 
bonis non, with the will annexed of Jno. A. Washington 
deceased in due form (the Executrix who heretofore qual-^ 
ified having departed this life.) Teste : T. A. MOORE. 

True copies. Teste : T. A. MOORE, 

Clerk. 

State of Virginia, ) 
County of Jefferson, f 

I Thos. A. Moore, Clerk of the County Court of said 
County certify that the foregoing are true copies of the 
last will & testament of Jno. A. Washington dec. & codicils 
thereto, & also of the orders of the said court relative to 
the same. Given under my hand & the seal of said court, 
the 7th day of Dec. 1859. 

[sE.Ai..] THOS. A. MOORE, Clerk. 

At a County Court held for the County of Fairfax, on 
the 1 6th day of January i860. An authenticated copy of 
the last will and testament of John A. Washington, late of 
Jefferson county, deceased, was this day presented to the 
Court by John A. Washington of Mt. Vernon, & on his- 
motion it is ordered to be recorded. 

Teste : ALFRED MOSS, 

Clerk- 
A true Copy. Teste : 

F. W. RICHARDSON, 

Deputy Clerk, 
1878, Nov. 21. 



INDEX. 



Andrew Washington, iii 

Anek (Bible), v 

Adils, King of Sweden, ix, 274 

Audur, Princess of Denmark, x 

Auda Diuphaudsa, Queen of Holm 

gard, xi 
Asa, Ouccn of Denmark, xi, 276 
Alfhilda, Queen of Denmark, xii, 

XX 

Aslanga, xii, or Aslpga, Queen of 
Denmark, xiii 

Anslech Turstain, Baron de Brique- 
bec, xvi, xvii, 277 

Aunsfred d'Exmes, xvi, xvii, 277 

Avelina de Crepon, xix 

Aublice de la Hare de Auberee, xix 

Adeline, Countess de Millent, xix 

Arlotta, Countess of Normandy, xix 

Arnkell, of the Orkne3's, xx 

Arnfidur, of tlie Orkneys, xx 

Alofa Arbot, Countess of the Ork- 
neys, XX 

Adam of Bremen, xxvi 

Ari Marsson, xxvii 

Alan, first Earl of Richmond, 3, 4 

Al'et fd Bodin, 4, 5 

Akaris, or Akar, or Akary, or Akary 
fil Bardolf, 4, 5, 6, 7 

Azelin, or Alselin, 4 

Alan, the Constable, 7 

Aston vel Washington, 10 



Agnes, Prioress of Marrick Abbey^ 
10, II 

Alice de Ravensworth, 13, 15 

Agnes de Washington, 14 

Alan de Washington, 15, iq, 20. 26, 

28 
Adam de Stavelej', 15 
Adam de Ravensworth, 16, 20 
Alice de Washington, 17 
Alicia de Washington, 17, 18, 19, 22, 

24. 37 
Alicia de Lexington, 18 
Albreda dc Ravensworth, 19 
Alicia Warde, 20, 22 
Adam de Washington, 20, 28, 30, 

34 
Alexander de Washington, 21, 34, 37 

Arthur Lawrence, 22 

Amercia de Washington, 25 

Alicia de Hertford, 27 

Alexander de Ravensworth, 28 

Alicia de Laton, 29 

Agnes Roter, 29 

Agnes Washington, 31, 45, 63, 72, 

73, 74, 82, 87, 302 
Adam Dcrling, 31 
Alicia Washington, 32, 86, 97 
Annabil Vavasor, 33 
Adam de Bowes, 34 
Alianna Washington, 36 
Anthony Washington, 45, 49 
[345] . 



346 



INDEX. 



Anne Washington, 45, 47, 49, 50, 52, 
59, 63, 73, 76, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 
96, 100, loi, 103, 107, 108, no, 

112, 126, 165, 304 

Amy Washington, 47, 78, go, 301, 

305 
Ann Washington, 52, 62, 66, 73, 184 
Ann Bateman, 61 
Alan Washington, 63, 73 
Albany Washington, 66, 80 
Ann Fisher, 67 
Abel Makepeace, 67 
Anne Shirley, 71 

Anna Washington, 74, 125, 223, 259 
Amy Curtis, 91 
Alban Butler, 93 
Anne Gill, 95 

Capt. Alexander Flamming, 103 
Alexander Barrow, 103, 174, 184, 

196, 197 
Anne Wright, in 
Col. Augustine Warner, 112 
Augustine Washington, 112, 114, 

115, 116, 124, 125, 126, 149, 174, 

187, 195, 318, 319, 320 
Alexander Spotswood, 126, 173, 176, 

337- 338 
Alexander Chalmers Lanier, 118, 

119 
Anne Ashton, 126, 149, 173 
Ann Walker, 146 
Gen. Andrew Lewis, 158 
Alexander Hamilton Washington, 

169, 191 
Albion Throckmorton, 170 
Rev. Alexander Belmaine, 170, 171 
Anne B. Whiting, 170, 192 
Anne F. Nelson, 171, 194 
Ann Olive Washington, 172, 195 
Andrew Parks, 182, 214, 254 
Ann Eliza Parks, 182, 212 
Anna Maria Washington, 187 
Augustus C. Washington, 187 



Augustus Washington, 190 

Ann Aylette Washington, 174, 196 

Anna Virginia Bassett, 199 

Annette L. Bassett, 199 

Alfred Lovell, 202, 226 

Augustus D. Lewis, 205, 236 

Atway Lewis, 207 

Annie S. C. Washington, 21Q 

Augusta Washington, 211 

Albert Shrewsbur)-, 213, 252 

Andrew P. Shrewsbury, 213, 252 

Albert W. Parks, 214 

Anna W. Parks, 214 

Anna M. Washington, 215, 216, 256 

Anna M. Thornton, 216, 217 

Albert Browne, 220 

Ansel m T. Nye, 226, 227 

Anna PL M. Washington, 230 

Adam Empic, 231 

Ann Eliza Empie, 231 

Andrew Reed, 232 

Alfred L. Hall, 234 

Anna Schroeder, 235 

Alice Hogan, 236 

Archie L. Good, 237 

Arthur S. Bedinger, 243 

Anna B. Washington, 246 

Annie H. Washington, 246 

Anna M. T. B. Washington, 247, 

342 
Anna S. C. Brown, 247 
Annie A. Brown, 248 
Anna F. Brown, 248 
Rev. Alexander Jones, 248 
Alice W. Weir, 248 
Annie W. Fontaine, 251 
Andrew Tallmadge, 254 
Ann M. Alexander, 254 
Ann B. Alexander, 255, 265 
Anna M. F. B. Washington, 256 
Ann Johnson, 257 
Ann S. D. Buchanan, 258 
Anna M. Tucker, 266 



INDEX. 



347 



Agne, King of Sweden, 272, 273 

Alrck, King of Sweden, 273 

Alf, Prince of Sweden, 273 

Aun Hinn Gamle, King of Sweden, 

274 
Agnes Poynings Bardolf, 283 
Agnes ]\Iortimcr, 284 
Anne Bardolf, 2S5, 286 
Anne Clifford, 2S5, 286 
Avicia Bardolf, 286 
Ann Cobham, 286 
Askettle dc Ferneaux, 292 
Alice Butler, 303 
Arthur Haselrig, 303 
Anthony Babbington, 303 
Ann Talbott, 313, 314 
Ann Tompson, 314, 315 
Alexander Wade, 316 
Andrew W. Warren, 321 
Ann Eliza Washington, 332 
Alfred Moss, 344 



Balder, Viceroy of Holstein, vii 
Biorn Jarnasida, King of Sweden, 

xiii, xiv 
Byrnhilda, Queen of Denmark, xiii 
Bernard the Dane, xvi, xix 
Barbe dc Montfort Turstain, xvii 
Bruso of the Orkneys, xx 
Bardolf fil Thorfin, xx, xxxi, 2, 3, 4, 

277 

Bodin fil Thorfin, xx, xxxi, 2, 3, 4, 6 

Bcrgliotta, Countess of Hlatha, xx, 
xxi 

Bjarnc Herjulfscn, xxiv 

Bondo fitz Akaris, 6, 11, or Bond de 
Wassigetu, 11, or Bondo dc 
Ravensworth, li, or Bondo de 
Washington, 11, or Bondo de 
Wyssington, 12 

Bcrtrand liagct, 9 



Brian fil Alan, 15 

Barbara Washington, 53, 68, 79 

Bartholomew Washington, 64, 76, 85 

Barbara Butler, 92 

Butler Washington, 114 

Betty Washington, 115, 116 

Mrs. Bevedy Whiting, 115 

Buckner Lanier, 117 

Burrill Lanier, 118 

Betty W. Lewis, 124, 164, 179 • 

Burdet Ashton, 126, 173 

Bartholomew Dandridge, 142, 143 

Betty Lewis, 147, 148, 149, 164, 319 

Bushrod Washington, 144, 146, 148, 
150, 151, 167, 173, 17^, 175, 178, 
183, 184, 1S5, 190, 196, 321, 322, 
323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 
330, 331, 332, 333r«342 

Benjamin Franklin, 145, 168 

Brj'an Fairfax, 145 

Betty Carter, 143, 149, 176, 177 

Beverly Washington, 169, 189, 190 

Beverly Whiting, 170, 192 

Betty B. Lewis, 178 

Betty W. Lewis, 179 

Bushrod Parks, 182, 213 

Bushrod C. Washington, 186, 215, 
259. 324, 326, 327, 329, 332, 343 

Burwell Bassctt, 187 

Burgess Ball, 187 

Beverly Snicker, 189, 221 

Betty Burnet Bassett, 199, 219 

Betty Burwell Bassett, 199 

Betty W. Carpenter, 177, 199 

Betty W. Lovell, 202 

Betty Lovell, 202 

Betty W. Steele, 203 

Brook G. Hereford, 205, 233 

Betty S. Hereford, 205, 235 

Betty F. Lewis, 206 

Betty B. Lewis, 207 

Benjamin F. Washington, 209, 239 
Bushrod W. Parks, 214, 254 



348 



INDEX. 



Bushrod W. Herbert, 216, 326, 330 

Betty L. Washington, 219, 262 

Bessie Washington, 223 

Bessie P. Washington, 224 

Betty W. Fox, 227 

Betty Carter, 227 

Betty C. Steele, 228 

Betty W. King, 229 

Betty S. Raymond, 229 

Brooice Gvvathmey, 230 

Broolce G. Empie, 231 

Brooke G. Reed, 232 

Broolce H. Massie, 233 

Bertha C. Hall, 234 

Betty G. Schroeder, 235 

Betty F. Finks, 237 

Bertha J. Washington, 240, 264 

Bessie Asbur5', 241 

Benjamin C. Washington, 261 

Betty S. Raymond, 263 

Rev. Beverly D. Tucker, 266 

Beverly Tucker, 266 

Baldwin de Thone, 278 

Beatrix Bardolf, 278 

Brian Aquarius, 292 

Bailey Washington, 307 

Bushrod Adams, 327 

Benjamin Bassett, 339 

Burrell Bassett, 339 



Canaan (Bible), v 
Caleb (Bible), v 
Charlemagne, Emperor, xiii 
Canute, xv 
Charles the Bald, xxi 
Charles the Fat, xxi. 
Charles the Simple, xxi 
Christopher Columbus, xxiii, xxvi 
Catlin, xxviii 

Conan, Duke of Brittany and Rich- 
mond, 6, 7 



Conan de Ask, 7, 9 

Conan fil Helie, 9, 11 

Conan de Washington, 11, 14 

Christina Blakiston, 32 

Catharine Washington, 64, 76, 88, 

98, 114, 123, 177 
Christopher Washington, 88, 97, 98, 

109 
Cornelius Wood, 104 
Caleb Butler, 115 
Charles Washington, 115, 116, 145, 

150, 167, 168, 319 
Capt. Christopher Brooks, 115 
Charles Lanier, 121 
Catharine Lewis, 123, 124, 177, 208 
Constance C. Harrison, 130 
Charles Carter, 143, 176 
Corbin Washington, 150, 167, 185, 

186, 19=;, 196, 257, 333, 335 
Charles Augustine Washington, 150,. 

187, 217, 258, 337 
Charles Little, 161 
Charles Simms, 161 

Catharine Throckmorton, 170, 192 

Catharine Nelson, 171 

Charles Smith, 172 

Charles H. Washington, 172, 195 

Corbin A. Washington, 174, 195 

Charles Lewis, 176 

Catharine Dale, 176 

Charles L. Carter, 177, 20i 

Charles E. Carter, 177, 201 

Comfort Wood, 181 

Charles Ball, 187, 218 

Crawford Washington, 190 

Caroline H. Gwathmey, 204, 232 

Columbia Lewis, 206 

Christine M. Washington, 210, 246, 

247, 256 
Cecil W. Washington, 212, 251 
Cornelia Shrewsbury, 213 
Creed Parks, 214, 253 
Churchill J. Thornton, 217, 257 



INDEX. 



349 



Charles A. Thornton, 217, 258 

Charles H. H. Browne, 220 

Charles Browne, 220 

Cynthia B. Washington, 221 

Clarence E. Washington, 222 

Charles Carter, 227 

Charles Perkins, 228 

Rev. Charles Carroll, 233 

Catharine Miller, 234 

C. H. Schroeder, 235 

Columbia Good, 236 

C. H. Gatewood, 237 

Charles H. Asbury, 241 

Christine W. Packett, 246 

Catharine D. McPherson, 248 

Charles Fox Patrick, 251 

Cornelia S. Gany, 253 

Charles Alexander, 255 

Charles A. Alexander, 255, 265 

Charles C. Paige, 263 

Ciiarlotte A. Ransom, 265 

Castellan de Tillierers, 277 

Conan Aquarius, 292 

Catharine F. Thompson, 314 

C. P. Lyons, 339 

<Charters — Circa 1166. Conan, Duke 
of Brittany, 6 
1175. Herveyfil Akery, 8 
1175. Her\'ius fil Akery, 9 
A. D. 1164. Robert de Ashton, 

10 
20 May, 1 168. Agnes, Prioress 

of Marrick Convent, 11 
Circa 1175. Bondo de Wessing- 

ton, 12 
A. D. 1201. Henry fil Hervius de 
Wyssington, 13 



Dan Mykillati, King of Denmark, 

viii, 272 
Dyggve, King of Sweden, ix, 272 



Drogo Turstain, Duke of LaMarche, 

XV. 

Dungad, Earl of Caithness, xx 
Dagus, King of Upper Hringa, xx 
Dionysia Mallorie, 42 
D'Arcy Washington, 75, 83, 95, 303, 

304 
Dorothy Washington, 83, 89, 94, 95 
Dorothy Dore, 100 
Drusilla C. D. Lanier, 118 
David R. McKee, 120 
Drusilla A. L. 'Cravens, 120 
Col. Daniel Parke Custis, 128, 129, 

135 
Dr. David Stuart, 145 
Daniel J. Adams, 158 
Daniel Coxe, 159 
Dangerfield Lewis, 178, 208 
Dorothea Washington, 187 
Dabney C. Wirt, 198 
Daniel G. Tucker, 200, 225 
Maj. Daniel Bedinger, 208 
Daniel B. Washington, 209, 238 
Douglas Perkins, 228 
David L. King, 229 
David R. Paige, Jr., 229, 263 
Daniel S. Vermillion, 234 
Rev. Dudley A. Tyng, 241 
David M. Perrine, 262 
David King, 263 

Donald, King of Sweden, 271, 272 
Domar, King of Sweden, 272 
Dag Spaker, King of Sweden, 272 
Doun Bardolf, Baron of Wirmegay, 

278 
David, King of Scotland, 296, 297 
Doddridge P. Chichester, 312, 313 
Dennis Johnson, 333 

E. 

Edward IIL, King of England, ii 
Emund Biorn, King of Sweden, v 
Ethelred, King of England, v 



35° 



INDEX. 



Ella, King of Northumberland, Eng., 

xii 
Erik, King of Denmark, xiv, 273 
Edmund Jacob, Prince of Sweden, 

xiv 
Eisten, King of Frondheim, xv 
Eisten Glumru, King of Frondheim 

or Thrandia, xv, xxii 
Eisten Vors, Earl of Upland, xv 
Einar, Earl of the Orkneys, xv, xx, 

xxii 
Ermina, Countess of Moere, and 

Duchess de la Manche, Nor- 
mandy, xvi 
Ertemberga de Harcourt, xvi, xviii 
Emma de Montchenseye, xvii 
Emmcline de Montague, xviii 
Erlind, of the Orkneys, xx 
Eric, King of Norway, xx 
Erling, Prince of Norway, xxi 
Einar Thamba-SceHur, xxi 
Eindred, Earl of the Orkneys, xxi 
Erik Upsi, Bishop, xxvi 
King Edward the Confessor, 2 
Enisan of Bennington, i, 2 
Eudo de Bayeux, 3 
Eudo fd William, 13 
Eudo de Stanwigges, 15 
Eudo de Washington, 16, 17, 20, 21 
Elizabeth de Strickland,. 18 
Elizabeth Lawrence, 22 
Edward Lawrence, 22 
Elizabeth Washington, 24, 29, 30, 

32, 34, 45, 46, 49, 50, 52, 63, 66, 

67. 70, 71. 75. 77. 79. 81. 84. 85, 

88, 90, 94, 95, 99, 100, 107, no. 

114, 122, 123, 145, 171, 198, 208, 

295. 299, 300, 308, 316 
Elena de Aldborough, 24 
Eleanor Percy, 33 
Eve Fitz Hugh, 33 
Elizabeth Ulvington, 35 
Edmund Washington, 36, 39 



Eleanor de Washington, 41 

Eleanor Tempest, 42 

Eleanor Washington, 45, 65, 96, ioS> 

197, 219 
Elizabeth Gilpin, 46 
Eleanor Mason, 48 
Ellen Washington, 63 
Edmund Fisher, 67 
Elizabeth Shirley, 70 
Elizabeth Jordan, 81, 82, 93 
Sir Edward Spencer, 88 
Elizabeth Mauee, 92 
Elizabeth Legg, 98 
Elizabeth Richardson, 105 
Edmund Crask, 105 
Edward Prescott, 105 
Elizabeth Hudson, no 
Elizabeth Lanier, 112, 117, 119 
Elizabeth Hutchinson, 113 
Elizabeth Thornton, 117 
Elizabeth F. Dunn, 119 
Elizabeth G. Stone, 121 
Elizabeth G. Lanier, 122 
Elizabeth Spotswood, 126, 149, 173^ 

176 
Eleanor P. Custis, 129, 148 
Mrs. Edward Ambler, 130 
Eleanor Stuart, 145 
Eleanor P. Lewis, 148, 150 
Elizabeth Park Law, 150 
Edward Park C. Lewis, 164, 267, 268 
Elizabeth W. Washington, 169, 191 
Emily Washington, 169, 188, 189, 191 
Elizabeth Burwell, 170 
Elizabeth C. Nelson, 171 
Elizabeth Booth, 171 
Edward Carter, 176, 177, 200 
Elizabeth W. Carter, 177, 201 
Eleanor C. L. Carter, 177 
Edward F. Carter, 177, 201 
Eleanor P. C. Lewis, 178 
Ellen H. P. Lewis, 178 
Ellen J. Lewis, 179 



INDEX. 



35* 



Emma T. Washington, 182, 211, 212 

Eliza Washington, 188 

Edmond Snicker, 188 

Emily Snicker, 188, 220 

Edward Snicker, 189, 220 

Elizabeth Snicker, 188, 189 

Ella More Bassett, 199 

Eleanor R. Tucker, 200, 225 

Eliza L. C. Tucker, 200, 225 

Eleanor. C. L. Brown, 201 

Eleanor C. L. Patterson, 201 

Ellen E. Lewis, 202 

Ellen J. Steele, 203, 228 

Ellen J. Patrick, 203 

Rev. Edward Winthrop, 203 

Ellen J. Gwathmejf, 204 

Emily C. Gwathmey, 204, 233 

Emily G. Lewis, 205 

Emma A. Lewis, 206 

Edwin L. Lewis, 207 

Emma J. Lewis, 207 

Eugenia Washington, 211, 249 

Eliza Parks, 212 

Eliza R. Washington, 219 

Ella B. Washington, 219 

Elizabeth Browne, 220 

Effie Washington, 222 

Edith H. Washington, 223 

Emma E. Washington, 224 

Elizabeth Wilson, 224 

Ellen E. Nye, 225, 226 

Ellen L. Nye, 226 

Ellen S. Chamberlain, 228 

Ellen L. Paige, 229 

Elizabeth T. Gwathmey, 230 

Ellen J. Caskie, 230 

Ellen C. Empie, 231 

Elizabeth Reed, 232 

Ellen Reed, 232 

Esom Ilannan, 233 

Elizabeth Ilannan, 233 

Ellen L. Vermillion, 234 

Elizabeth J. Hereford, 234 



Ellen L. Hall, 234 

Emma A. Gatewood, 237 

Eliza Finks, 237 

Emma M. Finks, 237 

Emma Lewis, 238 

Emma A. Wiley, 238 

Elizabeth B. Washington, iy^ 

Eliza M. Smith, 241, 260 

Edwin C. Smith, 241, 26a 

Enoch Jones, 242 

Emma B. Bedinger, 245 

Elizabeth B. Packett, 245 

Elizabeth F. Washington, 246 

Elizabeth C. Washington, 247, 256, 

310, 311, 313 
Elizabeth F. Brown, 247 
Eugenia W. Moncure, 249 
Emma T. Patrick, 250 
Enoch S. Gany, 253 
Rev. E. R. Leppett, 255 
Eliza S. Washington, 255, 266 
Eleanor L. Washington, 256, 266 
Elizabeth T. Smith, 260 
Eliza R. Perrine, 261, 262 
Elias G. Perrine, 262 
Evelyn Perrine, 262 
Ellen L. Paige, 262, 263 
Eleanor B. Ranson, 26s 
Emily S. Tucker, 266 
Eleanor P. C. Butler, 267 
Eric, King of Sweden, 272, 273 
Egil Tunnedolgi, King of Sweden, 

274 
Eystein, King of Sweden, 274 
King Edward L, 279 
Edward Prince of Wales, 281 
King Edward H., 281 
King Edward HL, 281, 296, 297 
Elizabeth Damor}', 282 
Elizabeth de B. Damory, 2S2 
Elizabeth Bardolf, 290 
Edwardaw de Wessington, 296 
Col. Edward Apsley, 302 



352 



INDEX. 



Eleanor Stuart, 308 

Edward Washington, 308, 309, 310, 

313. 314 
Edward S. Washington, 310, 3" 
Edward Sanford, 310, 313, 314 
Elizabeth L. Thompson, 314 
Edmund I. Lee, 335, 343 
Ephraim Worthington, 336 



Fridulph, King of Asaland, vi 
Fridleif I., King of Denmark, viii 
Erode Fredigod, King of Denmark, 

viii 
Fridleif II., King of Denmark, viii 
Frode II., King of Denmark, viii 
Erode III., King of Denmark, ix, xi 
Fridleif III., King of Denmark, ix 
Frode IV., King of Qenmark, ix 
Erode V., King of Denmark, ix 
Erode VI., King of Denmark, x 
Erode VII., King of Denmark, x, 275 
Fronde, Kirig of Frondheim, xii, xv 
Francis Washington, 50, 62, 63, 64, 

72, 75, 95, 96, 100, 101, 124 
Frances Washington, 52, 100, in, 

114, 168, 169, 187, 335, 339 
Frances Thompson, 67 
Frances Kelvert, 84 
Francis Pill, 92 
Fraticis Mauce, 92 
Foljambe Washington, 94, 99 
Francis Wright, in 
Frances Gregory, 117 
Francis Thornton, 117, 167 
Frances E. McKee, 120 
Fannie Lanier, i!22 
Fairfax WashiAgton, Ii23, 125, 169, 

171, 172, 191, 195 
Frances Lewis, 124, 173 
fielding Lewis, 124, 149, 157, 164, 

176, 205, 208, 236 



Frances Ball, 150, 168, 187, 218, 337 

F. D. Richardson, 162 

Frederick Washington. 165, 180 

Ferdinand Washington, 165, 180 

Francis Whiting, 168 

Frances P. Whiting, 168 

Francis Whiting Washington, 169, 

189 

Fielding Carter, 177, 200 
Frances F. Lewis, 179 
Fayette Ball, 187, 218 
Frances Peyton, 187 
Francis Pej'ton, 187 
Frances A. Washington, 187 
Fanny Washington, 188, 266 
Frances Snicker, 188 
Frances Finch, 196, 257 
Fayette A. Lovell, 202, 227 
Frances F. Gwathmey, 203, 204 
Fanny B. Gwathmey, 204 
Frances E. Hereford, 205 
Ferdinand S. Washington, 211, 250 
Francis M. Washington, 217, 258 
Frederick Browne, 220 
Frank Browne, 220 
Fanny Browne, 220 

Fannie W. Washington, 225 

Francis Fox, 227 

Fanny Steele, 228 

Fanny M. Steele, 228 

Fanny F. Gwathmey, 230 

Fanny B. Moore, 231 

Fanny L. Empie, 231 

Fanny B. Reed, 232 

Fanny F. Reed, 232 

Fanny L. Reed, 2312 

Frances E. Hall, 234 

Franklin B. Washington, 240, 263 

Fannie M. Washington, 240, 264 

Flora M. Washington, 242 

Fanny H. Packett, 245 

Forrest W. Brown, 247 

Frank McPherson, 249 



INDEX. 



353 



Flora Tallmadge, 254 

Fryer, Governor of Sweden, 271 

Fiolner, Governor of Sweden, 271 

Fulke Paynel, 287 

F. W. Richardson, 309, 314, 316, 

321, 333, 335- 339> 344 
Francis Adams, 328 



G. 



Gen. George Washington, ii, iii, 
iv, xxxi, 124, 126, 130, 133, 
134, 136. 152, 161, 162, 163, 166, 
168, 178, 180, 183, 1-84, 295, 308, 
322, 324, 327, 328, 329, 331, 338, 

339 
Gj'lfe, King of Sweden, vi, vii 
Gefyon, Queen of Zealand, vii 
Gerutha, Princess of Denmark, x 
Gothilda, Queen of Denmark, xi 
Gudrod, Gothic King of Scania, xiii, 

276 
Godefred Hvidsaerk, King of Jut- 
land, xiii 
Gorm, King of Denmark, xiv 
Gerlotte, Baroness of Briquebec, xvi 
Gisela de Montreuil, xvii 
Gunnora, of Normandy, xvii, xix 
Gudrida Thorfinnsen, xviii, xxv, 

xxvi 
Gilbert de Montgomerie, xix 
Grelota, Countess of Orkneys, xx 
Groa, Countess of Caithness, xx 
Guda, Queen of Norway, xx 
Gottfried, xxi 
George de Montreuil, xxii 
Sir George Greville, xxviii 
Gallatin, xxviii 

GeflTrey de Alselyn, 4 • , 

Gerard de Lascelles, 12 
Guy de Bovencourt, 13 
Gilbert de Washington, 14, 17 
Galfridus de Washington, 15, 19, 23 
23 



George Villiers, 59, 87, 302, 305 

Guy Washington, 66, 80 

Gerard Hawtyer, 67 

Gregory Washington, 75, 76, 79, 84, 

85. 92 
George Washington, 79, 87, 92, 98, 

100, 109, no, 113, 115, 116, 126, 

181, 196, 197, 209, 216, 222, 243, 

254, 256, 257, 318, 319, 320, 321 
Grace Washington, 84, 100, in 
Godfrey Washington, 95, 99 
George Gill, 95 
Grace Stanhope, 95 
Godfrey Copley, 95 
George Legg, 98 
George Gale, 112 
George M. Dunn, 120 
George W. P. Custis, 129, 148, 149, 

151. 338 
George W. Fairfax, 130, 320, 321 
George Steptoe Washington, 142, 

146, 149, 151, 161, 165, 166, 175, 

178, 180, 181, 185, 211, 247, 256 
Gov. Ceorge Clinton, 144, 159 
George Lewis, 146, 149, 175, 178, 

181, 185, 203, 205, 226, 236, 322 
George Fayette Washington, 147, 

150, 187, 217, 258, 336, 337 
George Aug. Washington, 150, 168, 

186, 335, 339 
G. Deneale, 162, 316, 335 
George F. Lewis, 164, 177 
George William Nelson, 171, 194 
George Booth, 171 
Geraldine Nelson, 171, 194 
George Spotswood, 173 
George Corbin Washington, 174, 

183, 197, 219, 260, 324, 325, 326, 

327, 328 
George W. Carter, 177, 200 
George R. Lewis, 179, 202 
Gwynn Washington, 188 
George Washington Bassett, 199, 219 



354 



INDEX. 



George Tucker, 200 

Gaston G. Lewis, 206, 238 

George W. Lewis, 208 

Georgiana A. Washington, 209 

George La F. Washington, 210, 246 

George T. Mason, 218 

George W. Ball, 218 

Rev. G. S. Carraway, 219 

George Wilson, 224 

George L. Nye, 226 

George Reed, 232 

Gertrude B. Hall, 235 

George Dean, 238 

Georgiana H. Washington, 240 

Georgiana A. Smith, 240, 241 

George T. Washington, 242 

George W. Bedinger, 244 

George W. Packett, 246 

George Lee Patrick, 251 

George W. Patrick, 251 

Glenn Perine, 262 

George C. Perine, 262 

Gilbert de Crepon, Baron of Bee, 

277 
Gilbert de Tillierers, 277 
Sir George Dunbar, 285 
King George IV., 295 
Pope George VIL, 297 
George Fenwick, 303 
George Babbington, 303 
George W. Washington, 310, 31 1, 

332 
Gerrard Pondegrass, 319 
Gersham Keys, 320 
George Mason, 328, 333 
George Atkinson, 332 
George Millan, 333 

H. 

Gen. Herreward Le Wake, i 
Harold, King of England, i 
Ham (Bible), v 



Heimdall, King of Scania, vi, vii, 

viii 
Horsa, Saxon Chief, vii 
Hengist, Saxon Chief, vii 
Havar, King of Denmark, viii 
Halfdan L, King of Denmark, ix 
Halfdan H., King of Denmark, ix 
Helge, King of Denmark, ix, and 

King of Zealand, x 
Harold Hildetand, or Hilditur, King 

of Denmark, x, xi, xiii, xv 
Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, x 
Horvendill, Prince of Jutland, x 
Hjartvar, Viceroy of Skane, x 
Halfdan HL, King of. Denmark, x, 

276 
Hoerk, King of Frondheim, xii 
Horda-Knut, or Harde-Canute, King 

of Denmark, xiii 
Harald Klak, King of Schleswig, 

xiii, XV 
Hakon, King of the Goths, xiv 
Harold, xv 
Halfdan, King of Frondheim, xv, 

XX 

Huldrick, Prince of Upland, xv 
Hallidur, Prince of Moere, xv 
Hrollagur Turstain, Earl of Moere 

and Duke of La Manche, xv 
Hilder, Duchess of Moere, xv 
Hrolf, or Robert Turstain, Baron of 

Briquebec, xvi, xxi 
Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, Eng- 
land, xvi, xviii 
Hugh Turstain, xvii 
Hugh Cum Barba, xvii 
Hugh de Rozel, xvii 
Herfault de Pont Audemer, xix 
Humphro^de Velutis, xix 
Henrj-, Earl of Warwick, xix 
Hugh de Montgomerie, xviii, xix 
Hoolf, or Rollo, First Duke of Nor- 
mandy, xxi 



INDEX. 



355 



Havard, Prince of the Orkneys, xx 
Harald I., King of Norway, xx 
Halfdan the Swart, xx 
Hringo, Prince of Hringa, xx 
Hrolf or Rollo, First Duke of Nor- 

mand}', xxi 
Haquin, King of Norway, xx, xxi 
Hemingur, Prince of Norway, xxi 
Holmfrida, of Sweden, xxi 
Hastings, xxi 
Humboldt, xxviii 
Henry fil Bardolf, 4, 5 
Hervey fitz Akaris, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 

12 
Herasculfus fil Akery, 6, 9, 10, 11 
Hugo fil Walter, 5, 12, 15 
Henry fil Akaris, 7 
Henrj' fil Henry, 7, 12 
Henry de Ravensworth, 8, 16, 19, 

24, 27, 29, 32 
Hugh de Ravensworth, 8, 13, 19, 20, 

21, 27 
Henry fil Hervey, 9, 12, 13 
Huestachio Karlyle, 10 
Henry fil Ranulf, 10, 20 
Henry fil William, 13 
Henry de Washington, 16, 17, 20, 

23, 24, 27, 29, 34 
Hugh fil Ranulph, 17 
Henry Fitz Randolph, 20 
Hugh de Washington, 20, 28, 34 
Hugh de Kerneford, 25 
Hugh de Lastington, 28 
Henry Fitz Hugh, 32, 33 
Henry Lord Percy, 33 
Sir Henry Vavasor, 33 
Hugh Fitz Hugh, 33 
Hugh de Ask, 34 
Henry Washington, 47, 49, 51, 60, 

63, 74, 82, 83, 87, 97, 114, 123, 

169, IBS, 197, 305, 306 
Henry Dore, 100 
Henry Sandy, Jr., 104, 105 



Hannah Washington, 122, 145, 167, 
186, 189, 196, 308, 334, 335 

Hannah Whiting, 123 

Henry Clinton, 135 

Humphrey Peake, 147 

Howell Lewis, 149, 164, 178, 179, 
205 

Harriot Parks, 150, 182, 214 

Harriot P. Washington, 165 

Hannah F. Throckmorton, 170, 192 

Harriet T. Whiting, 170, 193 

Hannah F. Whiting, 170, 193 

Hannah F. Nelson, 171, 194 

Henrietta Spotswood, 173 

Hannah B. Washington, 174, 196 

H. C. Dale, 176 

Henry D. Lewis, 179, 207 

Henry S. Washington, 189 

Harriet A. Washington, 189 

Hannah F. Washington, 190 

Herbert Washington, 191 

Herbert Beasley, 192 

Hamilton Beasley, 192 

Henrietta Washington, 196 

Henry Aug. Washington, 197, 221, 
222 

Howell L. Lovell, 202 

Harold Lewis, 203, 226 

Howell L. Steele, 203, 227, 229 

Rev. Henry Ruffner, 203 

Humphrey B. Gwathmey, 204, 230 

Henry W. Douglass, 206 

Howell R. Lewis, 207 

Henry H. Lewis, 208 

Henrietta G. Washington, 209, 245 

Harriet W. Shrewsbury, 213, 253 

Henry Shrewsbuiy, 213, 253 

Hannah L. Alexander, 215, 259 

Henry Browne, 220 

Henrietta Wilson, 224 

Henry T. Washington, 225 

Harold B. Nye, 226 

Howell S. King, 229, 263 



356 



INDEX. 



Harry F. Reed, 232 

Harry C. Goode, 237 

Henrietta G. Bedinger, 243 

Henry C. Bedinger, 243, 245 

Hull Moncure, 249 

Henry W. Fontaine, 251 

Henry Fitzhugh, 252 

Henrietta Fitzhugh, 252 

Herbert Gany, 253 

Harriot Tallmadge, 254 

Herbert Alexander, 259 

Henry I. Keyser, 261 

Henry B. Keyser, 261 

Henry S. G. Tucker, 266 

Hujlek, King of Sweden, 273 

Harald Haarfager, King of Norway, 

276 
Harold Blatrand, 277 
Hugh Bardolf, 277, 280, 286, 287, 

288 
Hubert de Burgh, 278, 289 
Hugh de Gurnay, 280' 
Henry Earl of Northumberland, 284 
King Henry V., 286 
Hugh Poinz, 289 
Henry Folliet, 289 
Henrj' de Grey, 290 
King Henry VHI., 292 
King Henry IV., 293 
King Henry VH., 295 
Col. Henry Gage, 303 
Haywood Foote, 316 



I. 



Ingild, King of Denmark, ix 

Ivar Vidfadme, King of Denmark 

and Sweden, x, xi, xiii 
Ingiald lUrada, King of Sweden, x, 

275 

Ivar Beentoris, King of Northumber- 
land, xiii 

Ivar, Earl of Upland, xv 



Ivo de Welleburne, 14 

Isolda de Washington^ 24 

Isabella Washington, 26, 76, 81, 93 

Isolda de Newsam, 30 

Isabel Fitz Hugh, 33 

Isabella Norton, 42 

Isabella Tempest, 42, 61 

Sir Isaac Heard, 175 

Imogen Reed, 232 

Isaac Miller, 234 

Inez F. Hereford, 235 

Ida Goode, 237 

Isabella L. Patrick, 251 

Irvine Keyser, 261 

Isabell Bardolf, 281 

Isolda de Grey, 289, 290 

Ivo Tailboys, 291 



J- 



John Washington, ii, iii, xxxi, 18, 26, 

31- 35, 36, 38. 40, 41, 43, 44, 45. 
46, 47, 49, 50, 52, 53, 62, 63, 67, 
71. 72, 73, 74, 77, 78, 80, 81, 86, 
87, 8,\ 89, 91, 92, 93, 96, 97, 98, 
loi, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 
108, no, in, 112, 113, 115, 191, 
196, 221, 257, 301, 302, 303, 304, 
305, 307, 308, 310, 311, 319, 320 
John de Wessyngton, iii 
Joshua (Bible), v ' 

Judith de Monteroliers, xvii ■ 

Josseline de Montgomerie, xix •' -^ 

Judith, Dutchess of Normandy, xiix 'i-H 
John de Kingston, Abbot, 6 . ' 

Julianna de Washington, 14, 18 ■ 
John de Washington, 16, 17, 21, 23, 
24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 35. 37. 
297, 298 
John fil Eudo de Washington, 17, 23 
Johanna de Washington, 18, 19 
John de la Ware, 21 
James Lawrence, 21 



INDEX. 



357 



John Lawrence, 22 

Johanna Washington, 26, 38 

James de Usseworth, 26 

Johanna de Scargill, 27 

John de Ravensworth, 28 

Johanna de Lastington, 28 

John de Laton, 20 

John de Ulvington, 30, 35 

Johanna Whitchester, 32 

Sir John Bulmer, 33 

Joane Fitz Hugh, 33 

John de Huddeswell, 34 

John de Watts, 34 

John de Warton, 36 

John Alayn, 37 

John de Morville, 41 

John Fordham, 42 

Jane Washington, 45, 46, 48, 50, 61, 
64, 76, 80, 96, loi, 103, 104, 114, 
115, 116, 125, 126, 150, 164, 167, 
174, 182, 183, 186, 211, 2i6, 247 

Jane M. Washington, 196 

John Bateman, 45 

Johanna Chambre, 46 

James Mason, 48 

James Washington, 50, 62, 63, 64, 72, 
73, 83, 86, 94, 97, 99. 109, no, 

113 
John Anlaby, 64 
John Thompson, 67 
Sir John Tyrell, 71 
John de Ferrers, 71 
Joan Washington, 79 
John Cheshall, 79 
Joan Pill, 92 
John Robinson, 95 
Joseph Washington, 96, 100, 306, 307 
Sir John Somers, 100 
Jolm B. Barrow, 104 
James R. Micon, 105 
John Green, 105 
Judith Washington, no, 113 
Dr. John Neale, no 



James Lanier, 112, 117, 118, 122 

John Smith, 113 

John Augustine Washington, 116, 
125, 150, 167, 173, 174, 185, 186, 
215, 216, 247, 255, 256, 323, 324, 
326, 327, 329, 330, 332, 333, 340, 
341, 342, 343, 344 

John C. Washington, 246 

John Thornton, 117, 126, 164 

James Walters Lanier, 118 

James F. D. Lanier, 118, 121 

John Gardner, 119 

John McClure, 119 

Rev. James Johnston, 119 

John R. Cravens, 120 

John James Lanier, 121 

John C. Stone, 121 

Jane Lanier, 122 

Sir John Peyton, 123, 172 

John Lewis, 124, 172, 337, 338, 339. 

John Bushrod Washington, 125 

Jane Thornton, 126, 149, 173 

John Dandridge, 128, 134, 135, 142,. 

339 
John P. Custis, 129, 134 

John B. Clemson, 129, 246,. 247, 256 

John Adams, 134, 184 

John Custis, 135 

John Hood, 143, 175 

John Alton, 146 

James Sangster, 162 

John Champ, 164 

John Bushrod, 167 

John Whiting Washington, 169, 188' 

Dr. John Nelson, 171 

John Taylor, 174 

Judith Lewis, 178, 198, 199 

John E. Lewis, 179 

John T. A. Washington, 180, 208,. 

209, 239, 241 
James Wood, 181 
John Parks, 182, 214 
James Wilson, 184 



358 



INDEX. 



John Cary Washington, 189 

John Henry Washington, 190 

John Beasley, 192 

Col. John Peter, 197 

John Tayloe Washington, 197, 221 

Julia E. Washington, 198 

Julia Augusta Wirt, 198 

John Bassett, 199 

Judith F. €. Bassett, 199 

Joseph Lovell, 202, 227 

Jeannette Lewis, 203, 226 

Rev. John D. Blair, 204 

John E. Lewis, 206 

John Shrewsbury, 212, 213 

John S. Washington, 212, 250 

James T. Washington, 212, 250 

Julia W. Washington, 212 

Dr. James Brown, 214 

John Creed, 214 

Jane C. Washington, 215, 255, 329, 

340, 342, 343 
James Barroll, 219 
James B. Washington, 219, 261 
J. W. Massie, 222 
Julia J. Washington, 223 
John E. Wilson, 224 
John T. Wilson, 224 
John F. Wilson, 224 
Joseph P. Steele, 228 
Joseph Perkins, 228, 229 
Julia A. H. King, 229 
John G. Raymond, 229 
James K. Caskie, 230 
John Caskie, 230 
John Moore, 231 
Joseph O. Massie, 233 
Jenny F. Vermillion, 234 
John Hall, 234 
Joseph E. Hall, 234 
John C. Hall, 235 
Joseph Schroeder, 235 
J. B. Schroeder, 235 
John Good, 236 



James M. Gatewood, 237 

James H. Gatewood, 237 

Rev. J. Warder, 237 

James Wiley, 238 

Dr. John J. Wharton, 239 

John Thornton Washington, 240, 263 

Jas. L. Ransom, 240 

John Wheeler Smith, 241 

Rev. J. B. Logan, 243 

John B. Packett, 245 

Lt. John Packett, 245, 337 

Rev. John B. Clemsen, 246, 247, 

256 
John C. Washington, 246 
Jane C. Moncure, 249 
Josephine Washington, 250 
lulieW. Fontaine, 251 
Jean C. Straith, 255, 264 
J. A. Straith, 255, 264 
John A. Alexander, 255, 264 
Jane M. Washington, 257, 332 
Jennie Alexander, 259 
Rev. J. M. Mitchell, 261 
Jane B. L. C. Washington, 261 
James M. Ranson, 265 
John B. Ranson, 265 
Jane C. Willis, 265 
Jane E. Tucker, 266 
Jornsida, King of Sweden, 273, 

274 
King John, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 278, 

289, 290, 291 
Julian de Gurnay, 280 
John Bardolf, 282 
John of Gaunt, 283, 293 
Joane Bardolf, 285, 2*86 
Joane Phelip 285, 286 
Joane Cromwell, 286 
John, Earl of Moreton, 287, 288 
Jordan Foliot, 289 
Jordan Briset, 289 
John de Grey, 290 
John Bee, 291 , 



INDEX. 



359 



Sir John Spencer, 301 

Sir John Butler, 302 

Sir John Babbington, 303 

James de Lancey, 303 

King James I., 304 

John Wentworth, 304 

John Hovenden, 304 

Jane Elliott Washington, 308 

Joshua Coffer, 309 

James Hereford, 309 

Joseph Reed, 309 

Joseph H. Washington, 310, 312 

John H. Manl)', 310, 312 

Maj. John Carlisle, 320, 321 

John North, 321 

Joseph Gound, 321 

John Graham, 321 

James Dorsay, 323 

James Nugent, 324, 325 

John Hopkins, 338 

K. 

Katla of Reykjanes, xxvii 
Katharine Beck, 45, 46 
Katharine Reynolds, 61 
Katharine Washington, 80 
Katharine Curtis, 91 
Kate McC. Lanier, 122 
Kate Washington, igo 
Katherine E. Hereford, 205 
Kattt H. Lewis, 207 
Katherine E. Schroeder, 235 
Kate T. Washington, 239 
Kate Fenwick, 303 
Kate Babbington, 303 



Laurence Washington, ii, iii, xxxi, 

48. 51. 52, 53, 59. 65, 66, 68, 70, 
71. 77. 78. 79. 86, 90, 96, loi, 
102, 104, 106, 107, 108, III, 112, 



114, 115, 116, 124, 125, 174, 197, 

198, 224, 266, 301, 302, 307, 308, 

314, 316, 317 
Leonard Washington, iii, 48, 51, 61, 

65, 77. 78, 86, 87, 96, 108 
Louis le Debonnaire, xiii 
Lodver, Earl of the Orkney Isles, xx, 

xxii 

Liotur of the Orkneys, xx 
Leif Erikson, xxiv, xxv 
Lionel, Lord Welles, 22 
Launcelot Washington, 47, 51 
Lucy Thezelwright, 61 
Lucy Washington, 64, 76, 78, go, 

165, 180, 210, 239, 248 
Laurence Makepeace, 66, 67 
Laurence Shirley, 71 
Lewis Lanier, 112, 117, ti8 
Hon. Lott Morrill, 120 
Lanier Dunn, 120 
Louisa M. Lanier, 121 
Louisa Washington, 123, 171, 189, 

190, igi, 210 
Laurence Aug. Washington, 142, 

147, 149, 165, 166, 181, 182, 211, 

212, 223, 250 
Lawrence Washington, 145, 197, 256, 

296, 321 
Lawrence Lewis, 148, 150, 151, 161, 
164, 176, 178, 179, 206, 207, 267, 

328, 331 
Ludwell Lee, 161 
Louisa Whiting, 170, 171, 189, 193 
Lucinda Nelson, 171, 193 
Louisa W. Nelson, 171, 194 
Louisa Fairfax, 171 
Lucinda Foote, 176 
Laurence F. Carter, 177, 201 
Laurence A. Parks, 182, 212 
Laura Parks, 182 
Lewis B. Whiting, 191 
Lucy Beasley, 192 
Lewis W. Washington, 197, 218, 261 



360 



INDEX. 



Lloyd Washington, 198, 225 

Lewis Lewis, 198, 199 

Lawrence L. Hereford, 205, 235 

Lawrence L. Douglas, 206 

Lawrence H. Lewis, 207, 236 

Lelia V. Lewis, 207 

Lawrence B. Washington, 208, 238, 

242 
Lucy E. Washington, 210 
Laura Shrewsbur}-, 213, 253 
Laurence W. Shrewsbury, 213, 252 
Lucy M. Parks, 214 
Laura S. Parks, 214 
Lucy Ann Tucker, 221 
Lucy B. Washington, 221 
Laurence R. Washington, 222 
Laurence G. Washington, 222 
Lawrence W. Wilson, 224 
Louise Steele, 228 
Lovell Steele, 228 
Lawrence L. Perkins, 229 
Hon. Leicester King, 229 
Rev. L. C. Martin, 236 
Lawrence W. Good, 236 
Lawrence B. Goou, 237 
Leland Finks, 237 
Lillian Washington, 240, 264 
Lee H. Washington, 242 
Lavinia Bedinger, 243 
Lillian T. Bedinger, 244 
Lucy E. Packctt, 245 
Louise C. Packett, 245 
Lucy M. Packett, 246 
Louisa C. Washington, 246, 247, 256 
Louisa C. Brown, 247 
Laurence A. Patrick, 251 
Laura Fitzhugh, 252 
Laurence S. Fitzhugh, 252 
Laura M. Gany, 253 
Louisa F. Alexander, 255, 264 
Louisa F. Washington, 255 
Lewis W. Washington, 261 
Lewis W. Keyser, 261 



Louisa F. Chew, 265 
Lecia de Muntenei, 289 
Lee Massey, 316 

M. 

Margueritte, Countess of Warwick, 
xix 

Malcolm, King of Scotland, xx 

Madoc, Prince of Wales, xxiv, xxviii 

Mar of Rcj'kjanes, xxvii 

Michael de Washington, 17, 23 

Matilda Lawrence, 21 

Margaret Lawrence, 22 

MatVda de Washington, 21, 29, 35 

Margaret Washington, 35, 48, 49, 52, 
53, 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 73, 74, 76, 
78, 81, 82, 85, 92, 93, 2IO, 303 

Margaret Tck)!!, 40 

Margaret de Washington, 41 

Miles Whittington, 45 

Miles Washington, 45, 48 

Miles Beck, 46 

Margaret Carus, 46 

Mary Washington, 47, 51, 52, 64, 68, 
72, 75, 76, 81, 84, 85, 88, 89, 95, 
99, loi, 102, 103, no. III, 115, 

168, 172, 190, 191, 195, 196, 257, 
261, 302, 304 

Melchior Reynolds, 61 
Martin Washington, 64, 74, 75 
Marj' Makepeace, 67 
Margaret Hawtyer, 67 
Martha Washington, 68, 134, 135, 
136, 151, 191, 212, 246, 250, 338 
Martha T3'rrell, 71 
Mar)' Horspole, 71 
Mabilla Washington, 72 
Maria Washington, 72, 75, 150, 217, 

337, 339 
Margaret Newb)', 73, 81 
Marmaduke Washington, 76, 85 
Margaret Gardiner, 80 



INDEX. 



361 



Matilda Washington, 83, 94 

Mathew Wentvvorth, 83 

Mathew Wabhington, 83, 95 

Michael Stanhope, 88 

Mordaunt Washington, 89, 91, 98, 

304, 305 
Mary Robinson, 95 
Mar}' Eyre, roo 
Mary Neale, 110 
Mildred Washington, 112, 114, 115, 

116, 122, 123, 125, 145, 164, 167, 

168, 337 
Mary Smith, 113 

Mrs. Mildred Gregory, 115, 116, 117 
Mildred Thornton, 117 
Mary Lanier, iiS, 119 
Mirian Dunn, iig 
Mary Dunn, 120 
Margaret D. Lanier, 121 
Mary L. Stone, 121 
Mary Gary, 130 
Mary Dandridgc, 142 
Marie Paul Yves Gilbert Motier, 

Marquis dc La Fayette, 145 
Mildred Hammond, 150, i68 
Martha Park Peter, 150 
Marinus Willett, 159 
Marj' H. Washington, 169 
Mildred Throckmorton, 170 
Mary B. Whiting, 171, 193 
MoUie Washington, 174 
Maria B. Carter, 177 
Mary W. Carter, 177, 201 
Mar}' B. Lewis, 179, 206 
Mary D. Washington, 181, 182, 212 
Mar}' Parks, 182 
Margaret Parks, 182, 2<4 
Mildred Lee, 183 
Mary L. Washington, 186 
Mildred Ball, 187 
Martha Ball, 187 
Mildred Hammond, 188 
Mary Snicker, 188, 219 



Maria Whiting, 191 

Mary H. Beasley, 191 

Mary W. Washington, 198, 222, 223 

Mary B. Bassett, 199 

Maria B. Tucker, 200 

Maria F. Tucker, 200 

Mary L. Tucker, 200, 225 

Martha E. Steele, 203 

Matilda C. Gwathmey, 204 

Mary A. Gwathmey, 204, 233 

Mary B. Hereford, 205, 234 

Mary E. Lewis, 205, 207 

Mary M. Lewis, 206 

Martha E. Douglas, 206 

Maria H. Lewis, 207 ^^^- 

Mary E. Washington, 209, 223 

Mildred B. Washington, 209, 242 

Millicent Wasliington, 211 

Martha D. Shrewsbury, 213 

Margaret Creed, 214 

Mary Hansford, 214 

Milton Hansford, 214 

Maria C. Anderson, 214 

Maria P. Washington, 215 

Matthew Harrison, 215 

Mary L. Herbert, 216, 324, 326, 327, 

330, 332 
Matthew Traner, 217 
Massey Traner, 217 
Matthew B. B. Washington, 217, 258 
Mar}' M. Ball, 218 
Mildred Thorner, 218 
Martha Gibson, 218 
Mary A. Washington, 219, 221, 310, 

3". 313 
Mary A. C. Barroll, 219 
Mary S. Washington, 222 
Maria F. Rives, 225 
Martha E. Perkins, 228 
Martha P. King, 229, 263 
Martha N. Caskie, 230 
Matilda C. Moore, 230, 231 
Meriam Hereford, 233 



-.62 



INDEX. 



Mary E. Hereford, 234 
Mattie A. Schroeder, 235 
Mary E. Hogan, 236 
Mary S. Lewis, 236 
Mary Good, 236 
Mary F. Gatewood, 237 
Milton D. Finks, 237 
Mark Finks, 237 
Marj' Dean, 238 
Monroe Wiley, 238 
Martha Wiley, 238 
Marian W. Washington, 239 
Mary W. Smith, 241, 260 
Mary E. Asburj', 241 
Mid.i H. Asbury, 241 
Mildred B. Bedinger, 242, 243 
Mary V. Washington, 243, 244 
Mahala Dempsey, 243 
Mary H. Brown, 247 
Millissent McPherson, 248 
Maria McPherson, 248 
Maria Weir, 248 
Millissent W. McPherson, 248 
Margaret W. McPherson, 249 
Rev. Magruder Maur)', 249 
Margaret Patrick, 251 
Martha W. Patrick, 251 
Martha D. Fitzhugh, 252 
Mattie Fitzhugh, 252 
Mary F. Alexander, 255 
Mary A. Keyser, 261 
Mary W. Keyser, 261 
Mary Perine, 262 
Rev. M. Mahan, 262 
Mildred W. Perine, 262 
Mary F. Ransom, 264, 265 
Milo de Wallingford, 277 
Sir Michaeil Poynings, 283 
Maud Bardolf, 289 
Mathevv Wentworth, 304 
Mar)' Hovenden, 304 
Margaret S. Washington, 310, 
313 



311. 



Mary Offiitt, 313 
Maxmn. Robinson, 320 
M. W. Dandridge, 339 

N. 

Nesbit, the Historian, ii 

Noah (Bible), v 

Niord, King of Sweden, vii, 271 

Nigello, the Chamberlain, 7 

Nicholas de Washington, 15, 19 

Nicholas Washington, 38, 40, 48, 61 

Nancy Lanier, 118 

Nathaniel Chapman, 165 

Nickolas Fit/.hugh, 173, 252, 335 

Nancy Davison, 176 

Nellie Douglass, 207 

Rev. N. W. Calhoun, 213 

Noblet Herbert, 216, 328, 330 

Hon. Nathaniel B. Tucker, 221 

Nancy E. Hereford, 234 

Nellie Hereford, 235 

Nettie Lewis, 237 

Nannie B. D. Washington, 258 

Nannie B. Washington, 259 

Nancy Paige, 263 

Nathaniel H. Willis, 265 

Nathaniel Chapman, 320 



Odin, King of Scandinavia, iv, v, 

vii, xxxi, 271 
Olaf Skotkanung, King of Denmark, 

V, xiv 
Olaf, King of Denmark, viii, ix, x, 

275 
Olaf Tractelia, King of Sweden, xiv, 

276 
Onfroi, the Dane, xvi, xvii 
Osberne de Crepon, xix • 
Onfroi de Velutis, xix 
Owen Chapelain, xxviii 



INDEX. 



363 



Owin Gwinneth, xxviii 

Otwayanna Carter, 177 

Otwayanna Owens, 201 

Orlando F. Washington, 222 

Olive Perkins, 228 

Olive A. Washington, 242 

Ottar Vendilkraka, King of Sweden, 

274 
Onund Braut, King of Sweden, 274, 

275 
Odo, the Chamberlain, 292 
Odo Dapiser, 292 
Sir Oliver Butler, 302 
Oliver Cromwell, 303 



Pythias, xxiv 

Pope Paschal II., xxvi 

Powell, the Navigator, xxviii 

Peter de Ouinciano, 6 

Peter de Washington, 13, 16, 31, 35 

Peter Washington, 48, 61 

Philippa Washington, 49 

Philip Washington, 64, 75, 84, 89, 

91. 99 
Philip Curtis, 88, 89, 91, 301, 302, 

304,305 
Penelope Audley, 89 
Peter Hudson, no 
Peter B. Whiting, 123, 170, 189, 190, 

193 
Philip Pendleton, 141, 166 
Perrin Washington, 169, 190 
Philip T. Nelson, 171, 193 
Patsy Spotswood, 173 
Polly Washington, 174 
Polly Lewis, 178, 208 
Queen Phillippa of England, 283, 

296, 297 
Philip Babbington, 303 
Sir Peter Warren, 303 
Philip Wentworth, 304 
P. Wagoner, 309, 339 



Peggy Sanford, 310, 312 
Paul Jones, 327 

R. 

Robert de Washington, iii, 11, 14, 
15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 
30, 32, 35, 37, 40 
Roe, King of Denmark, ix, x 
Rerik, King of Zealand, x, xi 
Rolfe Krake, King of Denmark, ix, x 
Rorik Slyngeband, King of Den- 
mark, X, xi 
Ragnor Lodbrok, King of Denmark, 

xi, xii, xiii, xiv 
Robert, King of Holmgard, xi 
Randver, King of Denmark, xi 
Rurik, King of Frisia, xiii 
Rogvald, Earl of Moere, xv, xx, xxii 
Rolf Nefio, XV 
Raoul de Toeny, xv 
Rollo, First Duke de Normandy, xv, 

xix, xxi 
Robert Turstain, Baron de Brique- 

bec, xvi, 276 
Richard I., Dukede Normandy, xvi, 

xvii, xix 
Duke Robert, of Normandy, xvi 
Richard de Halduc, xvi 
Rioulf de St. Savour, xvi 
Robert le Tort, Baron de Briquebec, 

xvii 
Richard d' Avranche, xvii 
Richard Goz, Viscount d' Avranches, 

xviii 
Roger de Beaumont, xix 
Robert, Earl of Millent, xix 
Rotrou, Count de Perche, xix 
Richard, Second Dukeof Norinandy, 

xvi, xvii, xviii, xix 
Robert, Duke of Normandy, xix 
Roger de Montgomcrie, xix 
Robert de Montgomerie, xix 



3^4 



INDEX, 



Ragnhilda Shakeson, xxi 
Richard Hackluyt, xxviii 
Sir Richard Grenville, xxviii 
Robert iil Akaris, 6, 9, or Robert de 

Ashton, 10 
Roger de Ask, 6, 9, 12 
Radulpho the Chamberlain, 7 
Robert Snarri, 8, 9 
Robert de Lascelles, 9, 11, I2 
Robert Camarario, 9 
Robert Ulram, 10 
Roger fil Richard de Hedon, 10 
Robert, Constable de Flemingburg, 

10, 24, 34 
Richard Ackerj'th, 11 
Ralph fil Bondo, 11, or Ralph de 

Ravensworth, 14 
Randolph fi*z Walter, 13 
Randolph de Ravensworth, 15, 19, 

20, 27 
Ranulph de Washington, 16, 20, 24, 

28, 33 
Sir Ralph Deincourt, 18 
Robert Warde, 20, 22 
Robert de Trav-ers, 21 
King Richard, the Lion-Hearted, 21 
Sir Robert Lawrence, 21, 22 
Roger de Washington, 23, 28, 34, 35, 

37, 38 

Ranulph de Ravensworth, 24 

Robert Werry, 24 

Roger de Hertford, 27 

Roger de Scargill, 27 

Robert Washington, 31, 35, 38, 40, 
41, 43. 44, 45, 46. 47, 48, 49- 5i, 
52, 53, 59, 62, 65, 66, 67, 70, 77, 
78, 79. 80, 84, 86, 88, 90, 96, 99, 
101, no, 145, 188, 243, 299, 300, 
302, 304, 307, 308, 316 

Sir Roger de Blakiston, 32 

Robert de Whitchester, 32 

Sir Richard Fourneys, 33 

Ralph, Lord Nevill, 33 



Roger Washington, 37, 39 

Richard Washington, 38, 41, 43, 44, 
46, 47, 49, 50, 51, 61, 62, 64, 72, 
73- 75, 77, 78, 80, 81, 82, 84, 85, 
90, 93, 94, 97, 99. 109, 223, 304 

Richard Tekyll, 40 

Sir Richard Tempest, 42 

Richard Norton, 42 

Sir Rowland Tempest, 42 

Sir Robert Umphraville, 42 

Ralph Westfield, 45 

Sir Richard Whytell, 47 

Robert Kitson, 48 

Ranulph Washington, 50, 64, 65, 76 

Robert Pargiter, 52 

Robert Bateman, 61 

Randall Washington, 62, 71, 73, 82 

Sir Robert Shirley, 70, 71 

Richard Jordan, 82, 93 

Roger Kelvert, 84 

Richard Brent, 90 

Reginald Graham, 98 

Robert Eyre, 100 

Richard Lanier, 112, 117 

Reuben Thornton, 117 

Rebecca Lanier, 118 

Robert E. Lee, 125 

Robert Lewis, 149, 164, 176, 178 

Reade Washington, 169, 190, 191 

Roger Nelson, 171 

Rebecca Washington, 172, 191 

Richard Henry Lee, 174, 183, 186 

Robert W. Washington, 181, 2ir, 
225 

Richard H. L. Washington, 186, 215, 
222, 330 

Robert Pollard, 178 

Robert P. Lewis, 179, 202 

Robert J. Washington, 198, 224 

Richard B. Washington, 198, 2l6» 
222, 246, 247, 256, 343 

Robert Bassett, 199 

Richard CM. Lovell, 202, 2Z6 



INDEX. 



36s 



Robert M. Steele, 203, 229 
Richard Steele, 203 
Robert W. Gwathmej'-, 204, 233 
Robert A. Hereford, 205 
Robert Hereford, 205, 233 
Ralph Douglass, 206 
Hon. Robert Rutherford, 208 
Robert N. Anderson, 214 
Maj. Richard S. Blackburn, 215 
Robert Herbert, 216 
Capt. Reuben Thornton, 217 
Rebecca D. C. Nye, 227 
Robert F. Steele, 228 
Rachael Moore, 231 
Robert E. Hereford, 234 
Rhoda V. Hall, 234 
Robert J-. Shroeder, 235 
Robert H. Hogan, 236 
Rev. R. F. Bunting, 242 
Miss R. B. Washington, 248 
Robert G. McPherson, 248, 249 
Dr. Robert F. Weir, 248 
R. C. L. Moncure, 249 
Richard A. Alexander, 259 
Rebecca Washington, 259 
R. A. A. Curtis, 261 
Col. R. P. Chew, 265 
Rose Bardolf, 277, 285 
Raphe Hanselyne, 277 
Robert de St. Remegio, 277 
Sir Roger Damory, 282, 284 
Robert de Uffard, 282 
Robert, Lord Morlee, 282 
King Richard H., 283 
Sir Roger Mortimer, 284 
Richard Scrope, 284 
Raphe, Lord Cromwell, 286 
Sir Reginald Cobham, 286 
King Richaru L, 287, 2S9, 290 
Earl Roger Bigot, 288 
Robert Bardolf, 289, 290 
Raphe Paynel, 289 
Richard de Grey, 290 



Robert de Grey, 290 
Robert de Wharleton, 292 
Robert de Wyssington, 292 
King Richard HL, 295 
Reasin Oflitt, 313 
Reazin Haislip, 313 
Robert T. Thompson, 315 
Robert Adams, 327 
Maj. Richard Blackburn, 32S 
Robert Brooke, 337, 338 
Robert W. Baylor, 343 



Sir Stephen de Wessyngton, ill, 

296 
Sigefroy, Monk of England, v 
Sigge or Odin, King of Scythia and 

Scandinavia, vi 
Skiold, King of Zealand, vi, vii, 

viii, ix 
Seming or Suabone, King of Nor- 
way, vii 
Sigurd Hring, King of Denmark, x, 

xi, xiii, XV 
Skulda, Princess of Denmark, x 
Snaile, King of Denmark, x 
Sigurd Snogoje, King of Denmark, 

xiii 
Steukill, King of Sweden, xiv 
Sveide the Viking, xv 
Sigurd. First Earl of the Orkney 

Isles, XV, XX 
Susanna, Baroness of Briquebec, 

xvii 
Snorro Thorfinnson, xviii, xxv 
Skulo of the Orkneys, xx 
Sumarlis of the Orkneys, xx 
Sigurd, Earl of Hlatha, xx 
Skage Skofteson, xxi 
Swein, Prince of Norway, xxi 
Skopte Shakeson, xxi 
Snorro Sturleson, xxi 



366 



INDEX. 



King Stephen, 6, lo 

Simon de Washington, 13, 16, 18 

Stephen de Washington, 24, 30 

Stephen de Hudderwell, 27 

Sophia Washington, 49, 62 

Simon Washington, 63, 74, 82, 83, 

93> 94 
Stephen Washington, 72, 80 
Sarah Washington, 84, 125, 191, 208, 

242, 308, 31Q, 312, 318, 320 
Susanna Washington, 88 . 
Simon Butler, 92 
Stephen Eyre, 95 
Sarah Copley, 95 
Susan Graham, 98 
Samson Lanier, 112, 117 
Samuel Washington, 115. 116, 141, 

146, 150, 151, 161, 164, 165, 166, 

168, 175, 178, 180, 187, 239, 319, 

338 
Sarah E. Lanier, 122 
Sally Car}' Fairfax, 130 
Samuel Gordon, 143, 175 
Sal lie B. Haynie, 146 
Sarah Green, 146 
Sydney Washington, 169, 189 
Sarah Warner Washington, 169 
Sarah A. Washington, 172 
Sarah Fitzhugh, 173 
Sally Washington, 174 
Sarah Taylor Washington, 174 
Stetson Foote, 176 
Sally C. Carter, 177, 200 
Sally P. Carter, 177, 200 
Samuel Lewis, 178, 207 
Samuel W. Washington, 181, 210, 

247. 256 , 
Sudwell Alexander, 183 
Samuel T. Washington, 187, 239 
Selina Washington, 190 
Sarah Beasley, 192 
Spotswood A. Washington, 196, 

256 



Sarah Tayloe Washington, 174, 197, 

221 
Sarah Ashton Washington, 198, 223 
Samuel R. Lewis, 207 
Sally E. Washington, 20g, 239 
Susan E. Washington, 209 
Samuel Shrewsbury, 213, 253 
Rev. Stuart Robinson, 214 
Sarah H. Browne, 220 
Sallie Washington, 222 
Sallie A. Washington, 223 
Susan Wilson, 224 
Sarah T. Wilson, 224 
Selina P. Washington, 225 
Sally S. Lovell, 227 
Sallie Lovell, 227 
Gen. Simon Perkins, 228 
Susan H. King, 229, 263 
Swift M. Empie, 231 
Samuel M. Smith, 241 
Squire Asbury, 241 
Solomon S. Bedinger, 243, 245 
Susan E. Bedinger, 244 
Solomon B. Bedinger, 243 
Susan A. Bedinger, 245 
Solomon S. Bedinger, 245 
Sidney T. Fontaine, 251 
Susan E. Fontaine, 251 
Shirley W. Fontaine, 251 
Samuel Keyser, 261 
Samuel L Keyser, 261 
Sinah E. Lee, 313, 314 
Samuel Collard, 328 
Samuel J. Crane, 343 

T. 

Throud, King of Frondheim, xi, xii^ 

XV 

Thora, Queen of Denmark, xiii 
Thyra Dannebod, Queen of Den- 
mark, XV 
Thorer, Earl of Moere, xv, xx 



INDEX. 



367 



Theobald, Count of Blois and Char- 

tres, xvi 
Turstain Goz, Viscount d' Exmes, 

xvi, xvli, xviii, 277 
Turstain de Briquebec, xvi 
Turstain Haralduc, xvi 
Torf de Harcourt, xvi 
Turstain de Bastenbourg, Baron de 

Briquebec, xvii 
Thorfin Karlsefne, Seigneur de Tor- 

raile, xviii, xxv, xxvi, xxvii 
Thorwaldsen, xviii, xxv 
Tourode, Sire de Pont Andemer, 

xix 
Turclietil, Sire de Turchetil, xx 
Torfidur, Earl of the Orkneys, xx, 

xxii 
Turstain Rauda, xx 
Thora, Countess of the Orkneys, xx, 

xxi 
Thyra, Queen of Denmark, xx 
Thorfin or Torkill the Dane, Earl of 

the Orkney Isles, xx, xxii, xxxi, 

I, 2, 3, 4 
Tryker the German, xxiv 
Thorwald Erikson, xxv 
Thorstein Erikson, xxv 
Thomas de Ask, 7 
Thomas fil Hugo, 15 
Thomas de Washington, 17, 25, 30 
Thomas Wa^iington, 18, 26, 31, 36, 

39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 

59, 61, 62, 63, 65, 73, 74, 75, 79, 

81, 84, 86, 92, 93, 96, 180, 190, 

211, 249 
Sir Thomas Kitson, 48, 301, 303 
Thomas Wombwell, 75 
Thomas Farrer, 89 
Thomas Stanhope, 95 
Thomas Hawkins, 104 
Thomas Pope, loS 
Thomas Lanier, 112, 117 
Thomas Egleston, I2I 



Thacher Washington, 123, 169, 172, 

191 
Thornton Washington, 141, 142, 150, 

165, 166, 179 
Rev. Thomas Wilson, 145 
Tobias Lear, 146 
Thomas Bishop, 146 
Thomas Walker, 157 
Tristam Washington, 165, 180 
Thomas Fairfax, 171 
Thomas Davison, 176 
Thomas Todd, 181 
Thomas Lee, 183 
Col. Thomas Blackburn, 184 
Col. Thomas Hammond, 188 
Tucker Washington, 188 
Temple Gwathme)\ 204, 232 
Theodore F. Gvvathmey, 204, 232 
Thomas G. Clemson, 210 
Gen. Thomas Fletcher, 210 
Thomas B. Washington, 215, 259 
Rev. Thomas Weeks, 228 
Thomas V. Moore, 231 
Theodore F. Empie, 231 
Rev. T. V. Moore, 232 
Thornton A. Washington, 239 
Thomas A. Browne, 247 
Thomas G. Moncure, 249 
Temple W. Moncure, 249 
Theodore W. Tallmadge, 254 
Thomas E. Buchannan, 258 
Thomas Alexander, 259 
Thomas D. Ranson, 265 
Thomas Lackland, 266 
Thomas Bardolf, 277, 278, 281, 284, 

285, 2S6 
Thomas Beaufort, 285 
Tancred, King of Sicily, 2S7 
Thomas Babbington, 303 
Sir Thomas More, 303 
Sir Thomas Gage, 303 
Thomas RadclifF, 304 
Thomas Bancroft, 304 



368 



INDEX. 



Thomas Hovenden, 304 
Gen. Thompson Mason, 324, 331 
Thomas Blackburn, 328 
Thomas Lee, Sr., 335 
Thomas A. Moore, 343, 344 

U. 
Ulf the Squint- Eyed, xxvii 



V. 

Vermund, King of Denmark, viii 
Virginia Washington, 172, 190, 195 
Virginia Lewis, 179, 206 
Virginia M. Washington, 189 
Virginia Gwathmej-, 204 
Virginia Hereford, 204, 205 
Virginia T. Washington, 209, 239 
Virginia Empie, 231 
Virginia F. Massie, 233 
Virginia L. Gatewood, 237 
Virginia E. Smith, 241, 260 
Vernon de H. Washington, 244 
Virginia L. Lanier, 261 
Visbur, King of Sweden, 272 

W. 

William the Conqueror, i, xix, xxi, 

xxii, 3, 4. 297 
Washington Irving, ii 
William de Hcrtburn, ii, iii, iv 
William de Wcss3ngton, iii 
Walter fil Bondo de Wessington, iii 
Sir William Tempest, iii, 42 
William de Washington, iii, 14, 17, 

iS, 19, 23, 24, 25, 29, 31, 32, 34, 

36, 37, 40, 41, 297 
William Bertrand, Baron of Brique- 

bec, xvi, xvii 
William Bee Crespin, xxi, 277 
William Longsword, Duke, xvl 
Weva Ducelinc de Crepon, xix 



Walter Giffard, xix 

William de Montgomerie, xix 

Walter Bardolf, 5, 12 

William de Bradwell, 5 

Walter fil Akaris, 5, 7, 9 

William de Ravensworth, 8, 13 

Warner fil Wj'mer, 9 

Willo de Eston, 10 

William fil Bondo, 11, 12, 13, 20 

Walter Backster, n 

Walter fil Bondo, n, 14 

Walter de Strickland, 18 

Walter de Washington, 18, 25, 30 

Walter Chesford, 22 

William Lawrence, 22 

Warren de Washington, 23, 29, 37 

Wflliam de Alborough, 24 

Walter Washington, 26, 32, 45, 49, 
66, 79 

William de Hertford, 28, 30 

William de Neusam, 30 

William Washington, 32, 36, 37, 39, 
40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 49, 52, 59, 67, 
75, 78, 79. 80, 84, 87, 88, 92, 
124, 183, 211, 297, 302, 305, 308. 

William Fourneys, 33 

William L'Englej's, 35 

William de Lancaster, 36 

William Mallorie, 42 

Sir William Elmdon, 42 

William Gilpin, 46 ^ 

William Gough, 52 

Walter Light, 66 

William Guise, 70 

Washington Shirle}', 70, 71 

Sir William Pargetar, 71 

Walter Clarges, 71 

William Butler, 78 

William Copley, 94 

Capt. William Mosely, 103 

William Hutchinson, 113 

Warner Washington, 114, 122, 16S,. 
169, 172, 188, 191 194 



INDEX. 



369 



Col. William Ball, 115 

Winnifred Lanier, 118 

Gen. William McKee Dunn, 119 

Williamson Dunn, 119 

Col. William Macon, 122 

Hon. William Fairfax, 122, 125, 320 

Wliiting Washington, 123, 172 

Col. William A3'lctt, 126 

William Aug. Washington, 126, 143, 

146, 149, 151, 167, 173, 174, 175, 

17S, 186, 198, 223, 224, 307 
William Byrd, 143, 175 
William Willie, 143, 175 
Sir William Wallace, 144 
Col. William Steptoc, 165 
Willoughby Allerton, 165 
William Herbert Washington, 169, 

191 
Warner W. Throckmorton, 170, 192 
Warner Whiting, 170, 192 
William .\rmistead Washington, 172, 

194 
William Thornton, 173 
William Spotswood, 173 
William F. Carter, 177, 201 
William T. Washington, 181, 210, 

249 
William Snicker, iSS, 220 
Warner H. Washington, 1S9 
William D. Washington, 190, 225 
Warner F. Washington, 190 
William Robinson, 196 
William Wirt, 19S, 224 
William \. Hasselt, 199 
W. 0\v( ns, 201 
William Hayless, 202 
William Steele, 203, 227, 228 
William G. Gwathmey, 204, 229 
William Hurch, 205 
William II. Lewis, 206, 237 
Walter (}. Washington, 212, 250 
William P. Alexander, 215, 259 
William Thorner, 218 



William de H. Washington, 219, 247, 

256, 262 
William Brown, 220 
Rev. William Cliesley, 223, 224 
Dr. Walker \yashington, 223 
Wm. Fetner Washington, 223 
William Wilson, 224 
Rev. William S. Plumer, 230 
William Massie, 233 
William C. Hereford, 234 
William H. Schroeder, 235 
Rev. W. H. Reed, 235 
Rev. William Hoag, 236 
Rev. William Garrett, 236 
Rev. William Lawlor, 237 
Wheeler E. Smith, 241,- 260 
William R. Dempsey, 243 
William B. Packett, 245 
Walter H. Packett. 246 
William Brown, 247 
William W. McPherson, 248 
Dr. William F. Alexander, 255, 259 
W. C. S. Alexander, 255, 264 
Wilson C. Selden, 255 
W. P. C. Johnson, 257 
Rev. William Hoge, 258 
William Cunningham, 259 
William L. Lanier, 261 
William L. Washington, 261 
William B. Perrine, 262 
Washington Perrine, 262 
Rev. William H. Meade, 265 
William de Tillicrers, 277 
William Bardolf, 277, 278, 279, 281,. 

2S3, 2SC, 290 
William Bacun, 277 
William de Warren, 278, 288 
Sir William Clifford, 285, 286 
William Philip, 2S5, 286 
William Briwere, 287 
William de Longchamp, 287 
William de Stuteville, 287, 288- 
William de Braose, 289 



37° 



INDEX. 



William de Grey, 290 
Walter de Grey, 290 
William Fitz William, 290 
William de Bradwell, 292 
William de Wharlcton, 292 
William, Count de Boulogne, 292 
Walter Wharleton, 292 
William H. Dorsey, 312 
William Moss, 314, 333 
William Thompson, 314, 315 
William Waite* 321 
West Ford, 328 
William Hunter, 336 
Wills — Laurence Washington, Sep. 
27, 1675, 102 

Col. John Washington, Feb. 26, 
1675, 107 

Gen. George Washington, July 9, 

1799. 136 
Edward Washington, June 30, 
1 791, 308 



Edward Washington, Jr., April 8, 

1813, 310 
.Laurence Washington, Nov. 15, 

1799. 314 

Laurence Washington (Page 124), 
June 20, 1752, 317 

Hon. Bushrod Washington (Page 

. 183), July 19, 1828, 321 

Corbin Washington (Page 186),. 
Oct. 19, 1799, 333 

Col. George Augustine Washing- 
ton (Page 186), Jan. 24, 1793, 335 

John Augustine Washington (Page 
215), July 8, 1S30, 340 



Yngve, or Niord, or Fryer, King of 

Sweden, vi, vii, 271, 273 
Yrsa, Queen of Sweden, i.\, 274 
Yngvar, King of Sweden, 274 



THE END. 



\ 



/I